US News: Turkey’s Deportations Force Europe to Face Its ISIS Militants - - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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US News Turkey’s Deportations Force Europe to Face Its ISIS Militants

11:00  18 november  2019
11:00  18 november  2019 Source:   msn.com

Lisa Smith allegedly tried to secure passage home by providing info on 'extremist family living in Dublin'

  Lisa Smith allegedly tried to secure passage home by providing info on 'extremist family living in Dublin' Smith, 38, is now believed to be reluctant to return to Ireland as she may face charges and will be unable to travel overseas .The former Aer Corps member and naturalised Irish citizen Alexandr Bekmirzaev claim to have met the family in ISIS terror capital Raqqa. © ITV Lisa Smith had appeared on ITV on a video posted online in which she claimed to be British The father, who came to Ireland after facing pressure in his native country, has Irish citizenship.He previously told locals he “wanted to live a more Islamic life” but is tight-lipped over his movements between 2014 and 2017.

PARIS — As Turkey followed through on its threat to release more Islamic State detainees last week, Western European nations were confronted with a problem they had long sought to avoid: what to do about the potential return of radicalized

On Friday, a woman deported by Turkey was detained upon arrival at Frankfurt Airport on suspicion of being a member of a terrorist organisation abroad. Federal prosecutors in Germany said the woman, a German citizen identified only as Nasim A., left the country in 2014 and married an ISIS fighter

a group of people sitting in front of a crowd: Suspected Islamic State members, many of them badly injured from the final months of battle, inside a crowded cell at a prison controlled by Kurdish forces in northeastern Syria. © Ivor Prickett for The New York Times Suspected Islamic State members, many of them badly injured from the final months of battle, inside a crowded cell at a prison controlled by Kurdish forces in northeastern Syria.

PARIS — As Turkey followed through on its threat to release more Islamic State detainees last week, Western European nations were confronted with a problem they had long sought to avoid: what to do about the potential return of radicalized, often battle-hardened Europeans to countries that absolutely do not want them back.

Faced with fierce popular opposition to the repatriation of such detainees and fears over the long-term threat they could pose back home, European leaders have sought alternative ways to prosecute them — in an international tribunal, on Iraqi soil, anywhere but on the Continent.

'All sorts of questions' to be answered 'if and when' Isis bride Lisa Smith returns - Tánaiste

  'All sorts of questions' to be answered 'if and when' Isis bride Lisa Smith returns - Tánaiste THERE will be "all sorts of questions around radicalisation" to be answered "if and when" Isis bride Lisa Smith is brought back to Ireland, Tánaiste Simon Coveney has said. Mr Coveney has confirmed that Defence Force personnel are in Turkey to help negotiate their former colleague’s repatriation to Ireland, along with her two-year-old child.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’ s decision to send back foreign citizens who supported the Islamic State is handing Western Europe a p

Last week, Turkey sent a dozen former Islamic State members and relatives to Britain, Denmark, Germany and the U. S . Turkish officials say that they hold 2,280 Islamic Europe already pays Turkey billions of dollars to stem the flow of asylum seekers from conflicts in Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan.

But President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey, made more powerful by a sudden shift in American policy, is determined to foist the problem of the captured European Islamic State fighters back on the countries they came from.

Last week, Turkey sent a dozen former Islamic State members and relatives to Britain, Denmark, Germany and the United States, and Mr. Erdogan says hundreds more are right behind them.

“All of the European countries, especially those with most of the foreign fighters, have desperately been looking for the past year for a way to deal with them without bringing them back,” said Rik Coolsaet, an expert on radicalization at the Egmont Institute, a Brussels-based research group. “But now, European nations are being forced to consider repatriation since Turkey is going to put people on the plane.”

'Please can you just get me home' - Lisa Smith will talk to anyone to clear her name, says family spokesperson

  'Please can you just get me home' - Lisa Smith will talk to anyone to clear her name, says family spokesperson ISIL bride Lisa Smith is “willing to testify, to talk to anyone to clear her name”, according to Dundalk Councillor Peter Fitzpatrick, who says she is desperate to get home. Cllr Fitzpatrick, acting as a spokesperson for Lisa Smith’s family, said that they have no problem with her being investigated upon arrival home and that Ms Smith’s mother will mind her daughter while it is conducted.Plans to repatriate the 38-year-old former soldier and her daughter are to be debated by the Cabinet, with the stipulation that she is investigated likely in the event that she is allowed back to her native Dundalk.

The same day, Turkey allowed the United States to use İncirlik and Diyarbakır air bases in southern Turkey for airstrikes on ISIL in Syria, and after an alleged ISIL attack on a Turkish border outpost in Kilis Province killing one Turkish soldier, the Turkish army shelled ISIL militants in Syria, killing one

Last month, ISIS -linked militants attempted to establish South East Asia' s first Islamic State caliphate on the southern Philippines island of Mindanao.

a group of people performing on stage in front of a crowd: A memorial at the Place de la Bourse for victims of the 2016 Brussels terrorist attacks. The Islamic State extremists were behind the plot. © Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times A memorial at the Place de la Bourse for victims of the 2016 Brussels terrorist attacks. The Islamic State extremists were behind the plot.

The sudden problem for Europe is a long-tail consequence of President Trump’s precipitous decision last month to withdraw American forces from northern Syria, which cleared the way for Turkey to take control of territory as well as many of the Islamic State members who had been held there in Kurdish-run prisons or detention camps.

The issue is further complicated by the fact that nearly two-thirds of the Western European detainees, or about 700, are children, many of whom have lost one parent, if not both.

Now that more of the former fighters are in Turkish hands, Mr. Erdogan has not hesitated to use the threat of returning them as leverage over European countries who have been deeply critical of his incursion, and who have threatened sanctions against Turkey for unauthorized oil drilling in the eastern Mediterranean off Cyprus.

ISIS bride Lisa Smith due to fly back to Dublin next week, sources claim

  ISIS bride Lisa Smith due to fly back to Dublin next week, sources claim Sources claim the 38-year-old will arrive in Baldonnel Aerodrome in Dublin .A spokeswoman for the Department of Foreign Affairs said: “In accordance with longstanding departmental practice we do not comment on ongoing consular cases.” Your browser does not support this video require(["binding"], function (binding) { binding("wcVideoPlayer", "#video_player_6eb38017-2776-4946-8698-87c7b7625145").all(); }); Last week, officials from the department were deployed to the border region of Turkey in order to assist with the repatriation of the former Air Corps private.

The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL /ˈaɪsəl, ˈaɪsɪl/), also known as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria ( ISIS /ˈaɪsɪs/), officially known as the Islamic State (IS)

Iraq is facing its gravest test since the US-led invasion more than a decade ago, after its army Isis extremists roamed freely on Wednesday through the streets of Mosul, openly surprised at the ease Turkish forces have targeted Isis forces in Syria. Militants also destroyed a police station in Baiji

The fate of the former fighters and their families has become yet another point of contention between Turkey and Europe, which is already paying Mr. Erdogan’s government billions of dollars to stem the flow of asylum seekers from conflicts in Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan.

Turkey is already home to some three million refugees from the Syria conflict, and Mr. Erdogan is determined to lighten his country’s load. But his real intent remains unclear: Does he really plan to send back all foreign fighters to Europe? Or is he opening the spigot, with the threat of a flood to come, to wring concessions from Europe?

a group of people standing in front of a tent: The al-Hol detention camp in territory controlled by Kurdish forces in March. © Ivor Prickett for The New York Times The al-Hol detention camp in territory controlled by Kurdish forces in March.

What is clear is that with limited military reach in Syria, European nations are ever more vulnerable to Mr. Erdogan’s whims. Turkish officials say that Turkey now holds 2,280 Islamic State members from 30 countries, and that all of them will be deported.

The problem is not Europe’s alone. On Friday, Turkey deported an American it described as an Islamic State member, Muhammad Darwish Bassam, to the United States. Last week, a federal judge in the United States ruled that an American-born woman who joined the Islamic State in 2014 was not an American citizen, potentially thwarting her return.

Fine Gael candidate says some asylum seekers need to be 'deprogrammed' of potential ISIS links

  Fine Gael candidate says some asylum seekers need to be 'deprogrammed' of potential ISIS links A Fine Gael by-election candidate has got herself in hot water over comments about the need for some asylum seekers coming to Ireland to be "deprogrammed." Verona Murphy, a candidate in the Wexford by-election on November 29 said some of these people "carry angst" and may have been "infiltrated by ISIS". Verona Murphy, a candidate in the Wexford by-election on November 29 said some of these people "carry angst" and may have been "infiltrated by ISIS".

Merzoughi and his fellow ISIS defendants were the first official cases of foreigners transferred from Syria to Iraq for trial—juridical guinea pigs in Transferring them to Iraq allows Europe to sidestep the issue, but it comes with a price—or, to be more precise, a fee. Sources from both the Iraqi and U. S

This force structure is largely replicated in each of its designated provinces, with the most skilled fighters and military strategists in each area serving Following the Siege of Kobanî which resulted in large losses among its veterans and commanders (including 2,000 militants killed), ISIL was forced

But the numbers and risks for Europe are far greater than for the United States. More than 1,100 citizens of countries in Western Europe are believed to be detained in northern Syria in territory once controlled by the Islamic State, according to a recent study by the Egmont Institute.

Their potential return has confronted European justice systems with competing security and civil liberties demands as they attempt to vet returnees, decide whether to detain them, and build cases on potential crimes that often happened hundred of miles away on remote Syrian battlefields.

Suspected Islamic State fighters detained at a courthouse in Qaraqosh, Iraq, in 2017. © Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times Suspected Islamic State fighters detained at a courthouse in Qaraqosh, Iraq, in 2017.

France, the Western European nation with the most detainees in Syria, is getting ready to take back 11 former Islamic State members. The Netherlands has also agreed to take back some of its citizens.

On Thursday, a 26-year-old man suspected of being an Islamic State fighter was arrested after landing at London’s Heathrow Airport on a flight from Turkey.

That same day, seven members of a German-Iraqi family arrived in Berlin from Turkey, from which they had been deported after several months in custody over suspected links to terrorism.

The father was detained, but the other family members were allowed to return to their homes.

'Ticking time bomb': Doctors and Londoners in IS jail in Syria

  'Ticking time bomb': Doctors and Londoners in IS jail in Syria Sky News' Mark Stone meets Islamic State prisoners inside a Syrian prison where inmates recently tried to escape. "You must not film anything outside the prison," the guard warns us as we arrive.A few weeks earlier, there had been an attempted prison break. Hundreds of Islamic State (IS) inmates tried to escape, prompted by the chaos of a car bomb outside.It was not successful. But the Kurdish soldiers guarding this prison can give no guarantees that it will not happen again.

While Europe may appear somewhat uninterested in actively seeking out its citizens, there is one thing that is clear — if an IS member returns to their In particular, Van de Donk notes the stigmatisation children may face . Turkey begins deportation of Islamic State militants , with many headed to EU.

What are Turkey ’ s priorities? Turkey has been more focused on blunting Kurdish militant groups than on defeating the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. Just last week, Turkish jets bombed Kurdish militia targets in northern Iraq on the same day that fighter jets also struck three Islamic State targets in Syria.

On Friday, a woman deported by Turkey was detained upon arrival at Frankfurt Airport on suspicion of being a member of a terrorist organization abroad. Federal prosecutors in Germany said the woman, a German citizen identified only as Nasim A., left the country in 2014 and married an ISIS fighter, whom she supported until Kurdish-led security forces detained her this year.

A second woman was released after landing in Germany, but will be tracked by experts on de-radicalization.

German officials said they believed more than 130 people left the country to join ISIS, 95 of whom were German citizens and had the right to return to the country. Nearly a third of the Germans are under investigation by federal prosecutors.

Gallery: Who controls Syria? (Business Insider)

Bashar al-Assad in a car:     Who controls which parts of Syria has changed dramatically    since the civil war began in 2011.        While Kurdish forces control a large swath of northeastern    Syria, a Turkish incursion threatens to change that.        Syrian President Bashar Assad, who used chemical weapons    against his own people, now controls about half the country.              Visit Business Insider's home      page for more stories.          Since the Syrian civil war started in 2011, who controls what    parts of the country has changed dramatically.      President Donald Trump's abrupt decision to pull US forces from    Kurdish-controlled areas in northeastern Syria, which Turkey    threatens to invade, cast renewed attention on Syria's    territorial divisions.      As of October, Kurdish forces, loosely allied under the banner of    the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), control much of northeastern    Syria, from the northern border with Turkey, encompassing the    former ISIS capital in the city of Raqqa, south to al-Qaim on the    Syria-Iraq border, as well as a bit of territory in western    Syria, north of Aleppo.      Here are the major forces that control Syria.

French officials said there had been no change in French policy, which opposes repatriation from Syria.

But pressure has been building, and security experts and some government officials have increasingly warned that the repatriation of militants — and their processing in European courts and detention in prisons — would be the only way to ensure Europe’s safety.

The deteriorating situation in northern Syria, some experts say, further increases the need for an orderly repatriation to Europe.

Left in Syria, more detainees could fall into the hands of Turkish forces or the Syrian government, which could use them as bargaining chips with the West.

Others could run away and try to regroup, or be taken back by Islamic State sleeper cells, as is feared in the case of some women who recently escaped from a camp in the region.

Ex-pal of ISIS bride Lisa Smith raises concerns about her return to Ireland

  Ex-pal of ISIS bride Lisa Smith raises concerns about her return to Ireland Ex-pal of ISIS bride Lisa Smith raises concerns about her return to IrelandCarol Duffy, who has converted to Islam, said that she is not happy about the possibility of Smith bringing her ‘ideology’ back to Ireland.

As the Nato summit in Wales ends, Simon Tisdall assesses the choices for the west' s leaders.

Turkey ’ s Double ISIS Standard. Ankara claims to oppose the Islamic State. Its actions suggest otherwise. There are many more examples of Turkey ’ s passive support to Islamic State fighters, including wounded Islamic State militants treated for free at hospitals across southeastern Turkey .

“There are a lot of risks associated with the policy of leaving them where they are,’’ said Anthony Dworkin, a fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations who has studied the Islamic State’s foreign fighters.

The potential dangers and difficulties are vividly demonstrated in the case of Tooba Gondal, a 25-year-old French citizen of Pakistani origin who grew up and lived in London until she traveled to Syria in 2015. She is believed to still be in the custody of the Turkish authorities.

Gallery: The rise and fall of IS (Reuters)

Militant Islamist fighters take part in a military parade along the streets of northern Raqqa province, June 2014. REUTERS/Stringer

A mother of two, she does not speak French and had spent most of her life in Britain, and although French intelligence services knew of her case, it is unclear that they had expected her to come to France.

“Tooba Gondal is a very notorious ISIS female recruiter, but until recently she wasn’t on the radar of French intelligence services,” said Jean-Charles Brisard of the Paris-based Center for Analysis of Terrorism, who was first to reveal that she would be deported.

A former London university student, Ms. Gondal became known in the British news media as an Islamic State “matchmaker.” She is accused of persuading other young Western women, like the British schoolgirl Shamima Begum, to marry Islamic State fighters.

She also posed with assault rifles in pictures on social media, and praised the Paris terrorist attacks in November 2015.

In recent months, Ms. Gondal has pleaded to be taken back to Britain, which had issued an expulsion order against her in 2018. She declared in an open letter to The Sunday Times of London that she was a “changed person” who wished to “face justice in a British court.” As a non-British citizen but a French passport holder, she is now likely to be deported to France.

France has already repatriated more than 250 Islamic State fighters and their families from Turkey since signing a bilateral agreement with the government there in 2014. But 400 French citizens are still estimated to be detained in Syria, according to the Egmont Institute, and France does not want them back.

UN Human Rights experts have ‘grave concerns’ over ISIS Bride Lisa Smith’s safety

  UN Human Rights experts have ‘grave concerns’ over ISIS Bride Lisa Smith’s safety Human rights experts from the United Nations (UN) have expressed ‘grave concerns’ over Lisa Smith’s safety in both Ireland and Turkey. It is believed that the so-called Isis Bride is one of two Irish ‘terrorists’ that will be deported from Turkey in the coming weeks. It is believed that the so-called Isis Bride is one of two Irish ‘terrorists’ that will be deported from Turkey in the coming weeks.

THOUSANDS of Islamic State ( ISIS ) trained militants are at large in Europe and waiting to strike as the continent faces its highest terror threat in over a "We can expect ISIS or other religious terror groups to stage an attack somewhere in Europe with the aim of achieving mass casualties among the

Instead, France wants Iraq to try them, especially the male fighters. French officials have led European negotiations with the Iraqi government to set up trials in Iraq. But disagreements between Iraqi and European officials — over legal matters like the death penalty and costs — have prevented an accord.

“It is legitimate that people who have committed terrorist acts should be judged closest to the place where they committed those said terrorist acts,’’ Sibeth Ndiaye, a spokeswoman for the French government, said at a meeting of the Anglo-American Press Association.

The other French citizens expected to return home — three Frenchwomen and their five children, all under 4 years old — were held in the camp of Ain Issa, according to their lawyer, Marie Dosé.

She said the families escaped in mid-October when the facility was abandoned by Kurdish forces. “They have risked their lives and their children’s to join Turkey and be expelled to France,” Ms. Dosé said.

For more than a year, Ms. Dosé and other French lawyers have fought to bring the mothers back with their children, as the women argued that they wanted to be tried at home. Last year, when a French television crew met one of the four women set to be deported, she said she wouldn’t leave without her son.

“If he leaves, I’m leaving with him,” said Amandine le Coz, a 29-year-old woman who grew up in a suburb near Paris. “He’s my life.”

In France and other European nations, the stories of people like Ms. le Coz and Ms. Gondal have elicited little sympathy.

“There’s been more sympathy for vulnerable children, but as you go up to adults, there’s a lot of pushback against women and there’s even more pushback against male militants,’’ said Joana Cook, a researcher at the International Center for the Study of Radicalization in London.

Dr. Cook, who has studied women and children who have returned to their home countries from Syria, said there had been no known incidents involving returnees.

Instead, terrorist cases, including the failed attempt to ignite a car loaded with gas canisters near the Notre Dame cathedral in Paris, involved women who had become radicalized at home and had never stepped foot in Syria.

In France, about 100 people who returned from Syria have already been judged and given sentences averaging 10 years, Mr. Brisard said. Some of those serving the shortest sentences have already been released, he said.

“They’ll be freed one day, that’s for sure,’’ Mr. Brisard said. “But it’s preferable that they be incarcerated in French prisons from where they can’t escape. And after they’ve served their sentences, it’s preferable that they be tracked by a competent intelligence service. In Iraq or Syria, I don’t have much faith in their intelligence services keeping track of our jihadists.’’

Norimitsu Onishi reported from Paris, and Elian Peltier from London. Carlotta Gall contributed reporting from Istanbul, and Melissa Eddy from Berlin.

UN Human Rights experts have ‘grave concerns’ over ISIS Bride Lisa Smith’s safety .
Human rights experts from the United Nations (UN) have expressed ‘grave concerns’ over Lisa Smith’s safety in both Ireland and Turkey. It is believed that the so-called Isis Bride is one of two Irish ‘terrorists’ that will be deported from Turkey in the coming weeks. It is believed that the so-called Isis Bride is one of two Irish ‘terrorists’ that will be deported from Turkey in the coming weeks.

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