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US News Why do so many animals have same-sex relationships? Scientists might have worked it out

08:30  19 november  2019
08:30  19 november  2019 Source:   uk.news.yahoo.com

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Scientists might have worked it out . Yahoo! News UK 18/11/2019. Geese look for food in a snowy field in Guilford, Connecticut December 15, 2013. Animals have both same - sex and different- sex relationships because the same sex relationships don’t have much effect on natural selection, and

Scientists might have worked it out . More than 1,500 animal species indulge in same - sex relationships – but this Animals have both same - sex and different- sex relationships because the same - sex relationships don’t have much effect on natural selection, and thus they aren’t ‘weeded

a flock of seagulls standing next to a body of water: Geese look for food in a snowy field in Guilford, Connecticut December 15, 2013. A large winter storm that dumped snow across the U.S. Midwest and East Coast swept into its final stage as it passed over New England on Sunday, with forecasters predicting a foot (30.48 cm) or more of snow in Maine.    REUTERS/Carlo Allegri (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT) Geese look for food in a snowy field in Guilford, Connecticut December 15, 2013. A large winter storm that dumped snow across the U.S. Midwest and East Coast swept into its final stage as it passed over New England on Sunday, with forecasters predicting a foot (30.48 cm) or more of snow in Maine. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT) More than 1,500 animal species indulge in same-sex relationships - but it’s always posed a puzzle for scientists. 

Why have so many species evolved behaviours which result in no offspring, in what’s known as a ‘Darwinian paradox’. 

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Same - sex sexual behaviour has been recorded in some 1,500 animal species. Reproduction requires mating with a creature of the opposite sex, so why does same - sex mating happen at all? Ms Monk and her co-authors question the first assumption by pointing out that many animals seem

TOPSHOT - Two Siberian tigers inspect pumpkins filled with meat on September 27, 2018 at the Tierpark Hagenbeck zoo in Hamburg, northern Germany. (Photo by Axel Heimken / dpa / AFP) / Germany OUT        (Photo credit should read AXEL HEIMKEN/AFP/Getty Images) © Getty TOPSHOT - Two Siberian tigers inspect pumpkins filled with meat on September 27, 2018 at the Tierpark Hagenbeck zoo in Hamburg, northern Germany. (Photo by Axel Heimken / dpa / AFP) / Germany OUT (Photo credit should read AXEL HEIMKEN/AFP/Getty Images) But a new article by researchers at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies suggests that the answer is simple. 

Animals have both same-sex and different-sex relationships because the same sex relationships don’t have much effect on natural selection, and thus aren’t ‘weeded out’ by natural selection, the researchers write in  Nature Ecology & Evolution.

TOPSHOT - New residents of the local zoo, one and half-year old polar bears Beliy and Szeriy cuddle as they explore their new home at Budapest Zoo and Botanical Garden on March 21, 2017. The animals arrived from the zoo in Moscow a few days ago. / AFP PHOTO / ATTILA KISBENEDEK        (Photo credit should read ATTILA KISBENEDEK/AFP/Getty Images) © Getty TOPSHOT - New residents of the local zoo, one and half-year old polar bears Beliy and Szeriy cuddle as they explore their new home at Budapest Zoo and Botanical Garden on March 21, 2017. The animals arrived from the zoo in Moscow a few days ago. / AFP PHOTO / ATTILA KISBENEDEK (Photo credit should read ATTILA KISBENEDEK/AFP/Getty Images) The researchers suggest that instead of asking, ‘Why?’ we should be asking, ‘Why not?’

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The Animals Among Us offers a fascinating if flawed account of our entangled relationship with Many more have spent at least some time in captivity, so it is well worth asking why so many His third explanation is that young women who were good at caring for animals may have been assumed

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Lead author Julia Monk said, ‘We propose a shift in our thinking on the sexual behaviors of animals. We're excited to see how relaxing traditional constraints on evolutionary theory of these behaviors will allow for a more complete understanding of the complexity of animal sexual behaviors.

TOPSHOT - Giraffes look on from their enclosure as a newly born giraffe calf with its mother is separated from others at the Alipore Zoological Garden, in Kolkata on June 7, 2018. (Photo by Dibyangshu SARKAR / AFP)        (Photo credit should read DIBYANGSHU SARKAR/AFP/Getty Images) © Getty TOPSHOT - Giraffes look on from their enclosure as a newly born giraffe calf with its mother is separated from others at the Alipore Zoological Garden, in Kolkata on June 7, 2018. (Photo by Dibyangshu SARKAR / AFP) (Photo credit should read DIBYANGSHU SARKAR/AFP/Getty Images) The researchers believe that same-sex and different-sex sexual behaviour evolved at the same time. 

The authors dispute the assumption that because different-sex behaviors are essential for sexual reproduction selection - or the tendency of beneficial traits that promote increases in population, size, or resilience - will eliminate sexual behaviors that do not immediately result in reproduction. 

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We at Bright Side learned why fighting from time to time can be good for your relationships . That’s why couples who argue together, stay together for a long period of time. If you want to keep your relationship strong and thriving, it ’s necessary to let your emotions out from time to time rather than

TOPSHOT - Two storks bill in their nest on a stillage in  Poehlde, northern Germany, on April 19, 2018. (Photo by Swen Pförtner / dpa / AFP) / Germany OUT        (Photo credit should read SWEN PFORTNER/AFP/Getty Images) © Getty TOPSHOT - Two storks bill in their nest on a stillage in Poehlde, northern Germany, on April 19, 2018. (Photo by Swen Pförtner / dpa / AFP) / Germany OUT (Photo credit should read SWEN PFORTNER/AFP/Getty Images) On the contrary, they suggest that same sex behaviour is not always - and maybe even seldom - very costly. 

Co-author Max Lambert, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California-Berkeley's Department of Environmental Science said, ‘So, if you're too picky in targeting what you think is the opposite sex, you just mate with fewer individuals. On the other hand, if you're less picky and engage in both same sex behaviour and different sex behaviour, you can mate with more individuals in general, including individuals of a different sex.

TOPSHOT - Two giraffes stand together in their enclosure at the zoo in Berlin on August 18, 2016. / AFP / dpa / Maurizio Gambarini / Germany OUT        (Photo credit should read MAURIZIO GAMBARINI/DPA/AFP via Getty Images) © Getty TOPSHOT - Two giraffes stand together in their enclosure at the zoo in Berlin on August 18, 2016. / AFP / dpa / Maurizio Gambarini / Germany OUT (Photo credit should read MAURIZIO GAMBARINI/DPA/AFP via Getty Images) The shift could allow scientists to research and understand this behaviour, Lambert believes. 

Lambert says, "So far, most biologists have considered same sex behaviour as extremely costly and, consequently, something that is aberrant./ Given our casual observations suggests that SSB seems to happen pretty commonly across thousands of species, imagine what we would have learned if we had assumed this was something interesting and not just a rampant accident.”

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