US News: Why do so many animals have same-sex relationships? Scientists might have worked it out - - PressFrom - United Kingdom
  •   
  •   

US News Why do so many animals have same-sex relationships? Scientists might have worked it out

08:30  19 november  2019
08:30  19 november  2019 Source:   uk.news.yahoo.com

Ireland's ecosystem is home to almost 16,500 species - here are 7 you may not have spotted

  Ireland's ecosystem is home to almost 16,500 species - here are 7 you may not have spotted And importantly, how you can protect some of them.A landmark report from the UN recently found that over one million animal and plant species are at risk of extinction.

Scientists might have worked it out . More than 1,500 animal species indulge in same - sex relationships - but it ’s aloways posed a puzzle for scientists . Animals have both same - sex and different- sex relationships because the same sex relationships don’t have much effect on natural

" Same - sex behaviors – courtship, mounting or parenting – are traits that may have been shaped by natural selection, a basic mechanism In other words same - sex relationships might shape evolution in subtle and important ways for many animals . When bilogists think about selective pressure in

a flock of seagulls standing next to a body of water: Geese look for food in a snowy field in Guilford, Connecticut December 15, 2013. A large winter storm that dumped snow across the U.S. Midwest and East Coast swept into its final stage as it passed over New England on Sunday, with forecasters predicting a foot (30.48 cm) or more of snow in Maine.    REUTERS/Carlo Allegri (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT) Geese look for food in a snowy field in Guilford, Connecticut December 15, 2013. A large winter storm that dumped snow across the U.S. Midwest and East Coast swept into its final stage as it passed over New England on Sunday, with forecasters predicting a foot (30.48 cm) or more of snow in Maine. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT) More than 1,500 animal species indulge in same-sex relationships - but it’s always posed a puzzle for scientists. 

Why have so many species evolved behaviours which result in no offspring, in what’s known as a ‘Darwinian paradox’. 

Potentially deadly tick-borne parasite found in UK for the first time

  Potentially deadly tick-borne parasite found in UK for the first time A potentially deadly tick-borne parasite has been found in the UK for the first time, scientists have warned. The organism, named B venatorum, causes babesiosis - a malaria-like animal disease recognised as an emerging infection in people.Symptoms from the infection include flu and jaundice, and can occasionally kill, according to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.The disease has been recorded extensively in China and also Europe, with two confirmed human infections in Italy over the last two decades.However, it has never previously appeared in the UK until now.

Scientists have analyzed over 40 years of data in 84 countries and concluded that the number of divorced According to the studies, the main reasons leading couples to divorce are the same . The thing is, despite the sexual revolution and the freedom in people’s relationships , most couples don’t

So why are so many data scientists looking for new jobs? Before I answer that question I should Following on from doing anything to please the right people, those very same people with all of the Despite this, many companies still have data science teams that come up with their own projects and

TOPSHOT - Two Siberian tigers inspect pumpkins filled with meat on September 27, 2018 at the Tierpark Hagenbeck zoo in Hamburg, northern Germany. (Photo by Axel Heimken / dpa / AFP) / Germany OUT        (Photo credit should read AXEL HEIMKEN/AFP/Getty Images) © Getty TOPSHOT - Two Siberian tigers inspect pumpkins filled with meat on September 27, 2018 at the Tierpark Hagenbeck zoo in Hamburg, northern Germany. (Photo by Axel Heimken / dpa / AFP) / Germany OUT (Photo credit should read AXEL HEIMKEN/AFP/Getty Images) But a new article by researchers at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies suggests that the answer is simple. 

Animals have both same-sex and different-sex relationships because the same sex relationships don’t have much effect on natural selection, and thus aren’t ‘weeded out’ by natural selection, the researchers write in  Nature Ecology & Evolution.

TOPSHOT - New residents of the local zoo, one and half-year old polar bears Beliy and Szeriy cuddle as they explore their new home at Budapest Zoo and Botanical Garden on March 21, 2017. The animals arrived from the zoo in Moscow a few days ago. / AFP PHOTO / ATTILA KISBENEDEK        (Photo credit should read ATTILA KISBENEDEK/AFP/Getty Images) © Getty TOPSHOT - New residents of the local zoo, one and half-year old polar bears Beliy and Szeriy cuddle as they explore their new home at Budapest Zoo and Botanical Garden on March 21, 2017. The animals arrived from the zoo in Moscow a few days ago. / AFP PHOTO / ATTILA KISBENEDEK (Photo credit should read ATTILA KISBENEDEK/AFP/Getty Images) The researchers suggest that instead of asking, ‘Why?’ we should be asking, ‘Why not?’

German scientists find 44-million-year-old caterpillar

  German scientists find 44-million-year-old caterpillar Scientists say it's the first time a fossil from a large butterfly species has been discovered preserved inside an ancient block of amber. They've described it as an "exceptional" find.Scientists say it's the first time a fossil from a large butterfly species has been discovered preserved inside an ancient block of amber. They've described it as an "exceptional" find.

The animal kingdom features sexual behaviours that most of us would find shocking. However, these attempts not only fail to work , but actually have an adverse effect on the horses’ semen . Many animals have their cake and eat it by practising “simultaneous hermaphroditism” – they have both

Same - sex pairings have previously been observed in more than 1,000 species including dolphins and penguins, but now scientists say they also He said more work had to be done to understand how much homosexuality in animals is an inherited factor, and to determine any genetic reasons for it .

Lead author Julia Monk said, ‘We propose a shift in our thinking on the sexual behaviors of animals. We're excited to see how relaxing traditional constraints on evolutionary theory of these behaviors will allow for a more complete understanding of the complexity of animal sexual behaviors.

TOPSHOT - Giraffes look on from their enclosure as a newly born giraffe calf with its mother is separated from others at the Alipore Zoological Garden, in Kolkata on June 7, 2018. (Photo by Dibyangshu SARKAR / AFP)        (Photo credit should read DIBYANGSHU SARKAR/AFP/Getty Images) © Getty TOPSHOT - Giraffes look on from their enclosure as a newly born giraffe calf with its mother is separated from others at the Alipore Zoological Garden, in Kolkata on June 7, 2018. (Photo by Dibyangshu SARKAR / AFP) (Photo credit should read DIBYANGSHU SARKAR/AFP/Getty Images) The researchers believe that same-sex and different-sex sexual behaviour evolved at the same time. 

The authors dispute the assumption that because different-sex behaviors are essential for sexual reproduction selection - or the tendency of beneficial traits that promote increases in population, size, or resilience - will eliminate sexual behaviors that do not immediately result in reproduction. 

Iman was the last of her kind in Malaysia. The Sumatran rhino is now extinct in the country.

  Iman was the last of her kind in Malaysia. The Sumatran rhino is now extinct in the country. There are fewer than 80 Sumatran rhinos left in the world.The rhino, named Iman, had cancer, though state officials in Malaysia described the death as natural, according to The Star, an English-language newspaper in Malaysia. The paper reported that before her death, Iman had nearly died several times due to blood loss from her uterine tumors but was nursed back to health each time.

Most animals have a mating season, and it 's usually a time when food, sunlight and fertility are plentiful. So they seek relationship , but not because doing so during this season will produce offspring that can survive "For example, some scientists argue the small pinky toe is on its way out .

The Animals Among Us offers a fascinating if flawed account of our entangled relationship with non-human animals . His third explanation is that young women who were good at caring for animals may have been assumed to become better mothers, making them preferred as brides.

TOPSHOT - Two storks bill in their nest on a stillage in  Poehlde, northern Germany, on April 19, 2018. (Photo by Swen Pförtner / dpa / AFP) / Germany OUT        (Photo credit should read SWEN PFORTNER/AFP/Getty Images) © Getty TOPSHOT - Two storks bill in their nest on a stillage in Poehlde, northern Germany, on April 19, 2018. (Photo by Swen Pförtner / dpa / AFP) / Germany OUT (Photo credit should read SWEN PFORTNER/AFP/Getty Images) On the contrary, they suggest that same sex behaviour is not always - and maybe even seldom - very costly. 

Co-author Max Lambert, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California-Berkeley's Department of Environmental Science said, ‘So, if you're too picky in targeting what you think is the opposite sex, you just mate with fewer individuals. On the other hand, if you're less picky and engage in both same sex behaviour and different sex behaviour, you can mate with more individuals in general, including individuals of a different sex.

TOPSHOT - Two giraffes stand together in their enclosure at the zoo in Berlin on August 18, 2016. / AFP / dpa / Maurizio Gambarini / Germany OUT        (Photo credit should read MAURIZIO GAMBARINI/DPA/AFP via Getty Images) © Getty TOPSHOT - Two giraffes stand together in their enclosure at the zoo in Berlin on August 18, 2016. / AFP / dpa / Maurizio Gambarini / Germany OUT (Photo credit should read MAURIZIO GAMBARINI/DPA/AFP via Getty Images) The shift could allow scientists to research and understand this behaviour, Lambert believes. 

Lambert says, "So far, most biologists have considered same sex behaviour as extremely costly and, consequently, something that is aberrant./ Given our casual observations suggests that SSB seems to happen pretty commonly across thousands of species, imagine what we would have learned if we had assumed this was something interesting and not just a rampant accident.”

HIV positive sperm bank launched in New Zealand .
The world's first HIV positive sperm bank has been launched in New Zealand, with organisers hoping to reduce stigma around the virus. Called Sperm Positive, it will begin with three male donors from across the country who are living with HIV but who have had treatment which has meant the amount of the virus in their blood is so low it cannot be detected by standard methods.This does not mean the HIV has been cured, but it does mean that the treatment has worked to the extent that the virus can no longer be passed on. This includes infection from sex without a condom or childbirth.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 0
This is interesting!