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US News Hong Kong Protests: Hundreds Arrested at a University and a Warning from Beijing

08:50  19 november  2019
08:50  19 november  2019 Source:   msn.com

Four men released by Gardai without charge after alleged sexual assault in south Dublin at weekend

  Four men released by Gardai without charge after alleged sexual assault in south Dublin at weekend Four men released by Gardai without charge after alleged sexual assault in south Dublin at weekendThe alleged sexual assault happened in the Rathmines area in the early hours of Sunday morning.

The Hong Kong protests began in June over legislation, since scrapped, that would have An additional 200 minors were stopped by the police but were not arrested on the spot. Beijing warns it alone can interpret Hong Kong ’s laws. In Beijing , the Standing Committee of the National People’s

Image. Protesters threw flaming projectiles at the police from behind barricades. HONG KONG — Hundreds of Hong Kong activists armed with firebombs and bows-and-arrows on Monday battled riot police who have laid a days-long siege to a university

a group of people in a dark room: Protesters inside Polytechnic University on Monday. By Tuesday morning only 100 holdouts remained inside. © Lam Yik Fei for The New York Times Protesters inside Polytechnic University on Monday. By Tuesday morning only 100 holdouts remained inside.

About 100 protesters remained holed up inside a Hong Kong university on Tuesday, as a standoff between the students and the police stretched into a third day.

Hundreds more who had spent days clashing with the police were detained after heavily armed officers surrounded the school and gave the protesters few options but to surrender and face arrest. Nevertheless, a number of students managed a daring escape, rappelling from a nearby bridge to be whisked away by waiting motorbike drivers.

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Several protesters have been arrested while trying to run from a Hong Kong university campus Police are still besieging the university where several hundred protesters are thought to be Why are there protests in Hong Kong ? Hong Kong - a British colony until 1997 - is part of China under a

Hong Kong police have fought running battles with protesters trying to break through a security cordon around a university in the city, firing teargas at anyone trying to leave. Polytechnic University , a sprawling campus that has been occupied by demonstrators since last week

As much of the territory remained gripped by the drama at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, the central government in Beijing on Tuesday condemned a decision by a Hong Kong court that overturned a ban on face masks worn by the protesters.

The Hong Kong protests began in June over legislation, since scrapped, that would have allowed extraditions to mainland China, and have expanded to include a broad range of demands for police accountability and greater democracy.

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Hundreds of protesters were minors, chief executive says

Protesters clash with police outside Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) in Hong Kong, China November 17, 2019. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi © Thomson Reuters Protesters clash with police outside Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) in Hong Kong, China November 17, 2019. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

Protesters armed with firebombs, bows and arrows and giant homemade slingshots clashed with the police for three days in the most violent confrontation yet in a half year of protests. The battle at the PolyU, in which the police fired hundreds of cans of tear gas and rubber bullets, represented the police force’s most direct intervention yet onto one of the city’s university campuses.

UCD advises students on exchange in Hong Kong to return home amid ongoing unrest

  UCD advises students on exchange in Hong Kong to return home amid ongoing unrest UCD advises students on exchange in Hong Kong to return home amid ongoing unrest in the Asian city.The advice reportedly affects a limited number of students, fewer than five, who are currently enrolled in exchange programmes in two universities in Hong Kong, the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CHUK) and the University of Hong Kong (HKU), both of which have closed for the rest of term.The advice comes following an increase in the intensity of protests raging in Hong Kong, as pro-democracy demonstrators brought the city to a standstill for the fourth day in a row on Thursday.

Pro -democracy parties in Hong Kong are concerned about the recent escalation in open conflict between students and police. Warning signs from Beijing . The campus of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University is located across from Hung Hom station, a vital transit point where the East

A stand-off at a Hong Kong university campus has led to fiery clashes overnight, as hundreds of protesters tried to repel a police advance. Large fires broke out at entrances to the Polytechnic University (PolyU), where protesters hurled petrol bombs and shot arrows from behind barricades.

As of Tuesday morning, 600 protesters have left the campus, Carrie Lam, the territory’s chief executive, said at a news conference.

Of those 600 protesters, 400 were above the age of 18 and immediately arrested. An additional 200 minors were stopped by the police but were not arrested on the spot. Those minors may still face arrest pending further investigation, she said.

Protesters clash with police at the Polytechnic University of Hong Kong in Hong Kong, China November 16, 2019. REUTERS/Laurel Chor © Thomson Reuters Protesters clash with police at the Polytechnic University of Hong Kong in Hong Kong, China November 16, 2019. REUTERS/Laurel Chor

Arrestees could be charged with rioting, a crime that carries a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison.

Mrs. Lam said the “special arrangements” that had been made for minors were intended to achieve “a peaceful and reconciliatory resolution.”

“The Polytechnic University campus has been seized for quite some time already and we are extremely worried about the dangerous situation in the campus,” Mrs. Lam said.

Australia: the campus fight over Beijing’s influence

  Australia: the campus fight over Beijing’s influence Drew Pavlou is an unlikely threat to the Chinese Communist party. The 20-year-old arts student at Australia’s University of Queensland has never even been to the country. But his decision to organise a campus demonstration in support of Hong Kong pro-democracy protesters has sparked a diplomatic incident between Canberra and Beijing and put him on a collision course with the Chinese authorities. The July 24 protest turned violent, with clashes between pro- and anti-Beijing students. The organisers were subsequently accused by China’s consular-general in Brisbane, Xu Jie, of being “separatists” and “anti-China activists”.

Carrie Lam says no children have been arrested but they may face further investigation.

Hong Kong has fallen into recession as tourists have fled and as its busy shopping areas become Hundreds have been arrested in recent months and quickly released by the police, as required by It was the death of a university student this month that set off the current round of protests and violence.

A number of protesters on Tuesday, including several wrapped in emergency Mylar blankets, waited to to be taken to a hospital. Some of the protesters appeared to be suffering the effects of hypothermia after they had been struck by a stinging dye that had been shot from a police water cannon.

Beijing warns it alone can interpret Hong Kong’s laws.

In Beijing, the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress took the unusual step of criticizing a Hong Kong’s court ruling that struck down a contentious ban on the wearing of face masks in public, effectively saying that the central government alone has the authority to rule on constitutional issues in the territory.

The Hong Kong High Court found that the ban, enacted in October, violated the territory’s mini-constitution, known as the Basic Law. In a statement released on Tuesday, a spokesman for the standing committee warned that the ruling “seriously weakened the lawful governing power” of the Hong Kong government.

Protesters get a lift from motorbikes waiting on a highway after taking a rope down from a bridge, to escape from Hong Kong Polytechnic University campus and from police, in Hung Hom district in Hong Kong on November 18, 2019. - Dozens of Hong Kong protesters escaped a two-day police siege at a campus late November 18 by shimmying down a rope from a bridge to awaiting motorbikes in a dramatic and perilous breakout that followed a renewed warning by Beijing of a possible intervention to end the crisis engulfing the city. (Photo by Ye Aung Thu / AFP) (Photo by YE AUNG THU/AFP via Getty Images) Protesters get a lift from motorbikes waiting on a highway after taking a rope down from a bridge, to escape from Hong Kong Polytechnic University campus and from police, in Hung Hom district in Hong Kong on November 18, 2019. - Dozens of Hong Kong protesters escaped a two-day police siege at a campus late November 18 by shimmying down a rope from a bridge to awaiting motorbikes in a dramatic and perilous breakout that followed a renewed warning by Beijing of a possible intervention to end the crisis engulfing the city. (Photo by Ye Aung Thu / AFP) (Photo by YE AUNG THU/AFP via Getty Images)

The National People’s Congress, the country’s top legislative body, has the authority to interpret legal matters involving national issues — and to change the Basic Law itself — but the timing of the ruling raised new fears of Beijing’s efforts to erode the territory’s autonomy.

The Date Hong Kong Protesters Can’t Escape

  The Date Hong Kong Protesters Can’t Escape The year 2047 is a deadline that has come to symbolize the end of the territory’s way of life.It is a question—and a date—that has hung over this city and its demonstrations these past several months. When Britain handed Hong Kong back to China in 1997, the two countries agreed on a 50-year transition period in which its liberties would be maintained. But as those freedoms have come under increasing threat from Beijing, including in the form of an extradition law that has triggered the worst political crisis in Hong Kong since the handover, 2047 has become more than just a distant deadline.

Live Hong Kong protest : police fire rounds of teargas at protesters trying to leave campus – live. Chaotic scenes on outskirts of campus, as hundreds Riot police have swooped on pro -democracy activists trying to flee a university they had set ablaze in one of the most violent confrontations in

Universities are telling students not to come back for the rest of the semester. Nearly six months into the antigovernment protests , life in Hong Kong Decisions by the city’s leadership, like an extradition bill that set off the protests and a face mask ban, have cemented fears that Beijing ’s authoritarian

“When the state loses, she changes the rules of game,” Joshua Wong, a prominent opposition leader, wrote on Twitter. “Beijing never intends to play by the rules.”

Article 158 of the Basic Law does, however, give the congress the final authority over interpreting whether the Basic Law conflicts with national law. It also calls on Hong Kong’s Court of Final Appeal to seek the legislature’s interpretation in considering cases whose legal significance extends to national issues.

People form a human chain to pass materials as they gather for a march towards Hong Kong Polytechnic University in Hung Hom district of Hong Kong on November 18, 2019. - Dozens of Hong Kong protesters escaped a two-day police siege at a campus late November 18 by shimmying down a rope from a bridge to awaiting motorbikes in a dramatic and perilous breakout that followed a renewed warning by Beijing of a possible intervention to end the crisis engulfing the city. (Photo by Philip FONG / AFP) (Photo by PHILIP FONG/AFP via Getty Images) People form a human chain to pass materials as they gather for a march towards Hong Kong Polytechnic University in Hung Hom district of Hong Kong on November 18, 2019. - Dozens of Hong Kong protesters escaped a two-day police siege at a campus late November 18 by shimmying down a rope from a bridge to awaiting motorbikes in a dramatic and perilous breakout that followed a renewed warning by Beijing of a possible intervention to end the crisis engulfing the city. (Photo by Philip FONG / AFP) (Photo by PHILIP FONG/AFP via Getty Images)

The statement suggested that Beijing was prepared to act decisively to restore the mask ban, but the implications could be much greater, showing that there are limits of the national government’s tolerance for an independent judicial system that has been a pillar of Hong Kong’s singular political and economic status.

Tear gas above ground, snakes below: Hong Kong protesters take to sewers to flee

  Tear gas above ground, snakes below: Hong Kong protesters take to sewers to flee HONGKONG-PROTESTS/SEWERS (PIX, TV):Tear gas above ground, snakes below: Hong Kong protesters take to sewers to fleeHow many took to the underground network of tunnels to flee and whether any actually got away is unclear.

Hundreds of student protesters became trapped inside PolyU after Hong Kong police closed all university exits following violent clashes, which entailed demonstrators hurling petrol bombs, bamboo poles and bricks, and shooting arrows at police officers. The Hong Kong -based newspaper cited an

Hong Kong police fired tear gas and rubber bullets to force back anti-government protesters trying to escape a university . Hundreds are holed up at the university with petrol bombs and other homemade weapons amid fears of a bloody crackdown.

In another statement on Tuesday, a spokesman for the Chinese government’s office that handles Hong Kong affairs, Yang Guang, also criticized the court’s decision to overturn the ban, saying it had “a gravely negative social impact” and “brazenly challenged the authority of the National People’s Congress Standing Committee and the governance powers of the chief executive conferred by the law.”

New chief calls on public to condemn protesters.

Police deploy a water cannon to disperse protesters attempting to march towards Hong Kong Polytechnic University in Hung Hom district of Hong Kong on November 18, 2019. - Dozens of Hong Kong protesters escaped a two-day police siege at a campus late on November 18 by shimmying down a rope from a bridge to awaiting motorbikes in a dramatic and perilous breakout that followed a renewed warning by Beijing of a possible intervention to end the crisis engulfing the city. (Photo by DALE DE LA REY / AFP) (Photo by DALE DE LA REY/AFP via Getty Images) Police deploy a water cannon to disperse protesters attempting to march towards Hong Kong Polytechnic University in Hung Hom district of Hong Kong on November 18, 2019. - Dozens of Hong Kong protesters escaped a two-day police siege at a campus late on November 18 by shimmying down a rope from a bridge to awaiting motorbikes in a dramatic and perilous breakout that followed a renewed warning by Beijing of a possible intervention to end the crisis engulfing the city. (Photo by DALE DE LA REY / AFP) (Photo by DALE DE LA REY/AFP via Getty Images)

Hong Kong’s embattled police force, once regarded as “Asia’s finest,” has a new boss.

Tang Ping-keung, formerly the territory’s No. 2 police official, was named commissioner of police on Tuesday after approval from the central government in Beijing.

In an interview with the South China Morning Post, Mr. Tang blamed the public for tolerating the protests and in turn encouraging their violent acts. “If everyone had come out earlier to condemn the violence, society would not have turned into this state in five months,” he said.

“We can only end the unrest with society’s condemnation, reflection by the rioters, plus our appropriate tactics,” he added.

Mr. Tang also rejected a key demand of the protesters: setting up an independent commission to investigate police conduct during the protests.

“Our staff might think they are being particularly targeted if the well-established mechanism is bypassed. We will be disappointed,” he told the Post.

Gallery: Hong Kong police battle protesters on campus (Associated Press)

Riot police detain a protester outside of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University as police storm the campus in Hong Kong, early Monday, Nov. 18, 2019. Fiery explosions were seen early Monday as Hong Kong police stormed into a university held by protesters after an all-night standoff. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

Hong Kong leader to follow 'Tottenham riots' example .
Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam has said she will follow the example of the 2011 London riots by setting up a committee to look at the causes of the violence that has plagued the city. Pro-democracy candidates made huge gains in local council elections this week and Sky's Stuart Ramsay asked Mrs Lam if it was now time to properly engage with the protesters.She did not offer any concessions, instead saying she would examine ways to look at their underlying grievances.

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