•   
  •   

US News Why Did Vikings Bury Two People in Boats on Top of Each Other, 100 Years Apart?

07:40  23 november  2019
07:40  23 november  2019 Source:   gizmodo.com

Irish Coast Guard suspends search and rescue operations due to 'malfunctioning' lifejackets

  Irish Coast Guard suspends search and rescue operations due to 'malfunctioning' lifejackets The order means that volunteers at 23 of the service’s 44 stations cannot launch for rescue operations until further notice .In an email sent to unit officers-in-charge (OICs) around the country on Friday afternoon, the Irish Coast Guard said: “An investigation is under way into the recent malfunctioning of Rescue 400 lifejackets.Specifically, the 275N section of the lifejacket failed to fully function when when activated.

The man, who died 100 years before the woman, was buried with a sword, spear and shieldCredit Some groups of Vikings did live on for a bit longer after this period in different countries across the The Vikings often buried their warriors in boats under large mounds of soil (artist impression)Credit

Google’s Stadia absolutely should have done the same, rather than ask people to spend $US130 (2) on a buggy service, and then spend $US20 () to $US60 () a piece on the games available Why Did Vikings Bury Two People In Boats On Top Of Each Other , 100 Years Apart ?

(Video by GeoBeats)

Archaeologists in central Norway have discovered an unusual Viking burial site in which one boat grave was placed on top of another. On its own, that’s pretty odd—but it’s even weirder considering the two burials are separated by 100 years.

That Vikings sometimes buried their dead inside of boats is well documented, but the new discovery, in which two boat graves were placed atop each other, is exceptionally rare and poorly understood.

a boat sitting on top of a sandy beach: Artist’s depiction of the woman’s boat grave, placed atop an earlier grave dating back approximately 100 years. © Image: Arkikon Artist’s depiction of the woman’s boat grave, placed atop an earlier grave dating back approximately 100 years.

The unusual grave setting was discovered this past October during road maintenance, prompting an investigation by a team of archaeologists from the NTNU Science Museum, according to a ScienceNorway article commissioned by the NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology. The site is located near the village of Vinjeøra in central Norway.

Bride-to-be leaves people horrified by 'disease-ridden nails' in ring photo

  Bride-to-be leaves people horrified by 'disease-ridden nails' in ring photo The ring has a huge sparkling diamond in the centre of it - but people were more concerned with the 'bacteria' under her nails after a photo was shared on FacebookThe picture shows a silver ring with a huge diamond in the middle as well as other smaller diamonds around the twisted band.

It is only when the boat is buried that the Vinjeøra Vikings do something that will intrigue archaeologists more than 1000 years into the future. Two - boats -in-one and interesting grave goods are not the only things that make the archaeologist enthusiastic about this finding.

Archaeologists don't know why the two vessels were buried on top of one another, but the practice may be linked with property rights. The team found the nested boats at the edge of the biggest mound in a larger burial ground. Previously, archaeologists excavating the site discovered a piece of a

A video from NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology (with Norwegian captions) illustrating the Viking boat burials.

an old wooden chair: Artist’s conception of the male Viking boat grave burial. © Image: Arkikon Artist’s conception of the male Viking boat grave burial.

The graves hold two bodies, a male and female. The older grave, containing a Viking man, dates back to the 8th century CE, while the more recent grave, of a Viking woman, dates back to the 9th century CE. The Vikings unearthed the original grave after some 100 years, placed the second boat grave on top, and then reburied both, reports ScienceNorway. The reason isn’t entirely clear, but the archaeologists have good reason to believe the individuals were related. 

“It’s reasonable to think that the two were buried together to mark the family’s ownership to the farm, in a society that for the most part didn’t write things down.”

Waters Close Over Venice

  Waters Close Over Venice Waters Close Over Venice

Archaeologists have discovered a mysterious Viking grave in which two people who died around 100 years apart were buried together in boats . Still, this is essentially an unknown phenomenon," he said. The archaeologists are now trying to understand more about the two people who were buried

The archaeologists were confused about why two people were buried together even though they died 100 years apart . The team of NTNU researchers found a boat grave of a woman, who died at the farm now known as c.850-900 boat burial of a woman * on top of * C8th one of man with weapons.

Gallery: The most astonishing treasure finds of 2019 so far (Lovemoney) 

a close up of food: Dazzling gold jewelry and coins, mythical sunken temples and a long-lost chess piece worth hundreds of thousands of dollars – these are just some of the incredible treasures that have been discovered this year. Click through to take a look at the most jaw-dropping finds of 2019 to date.

“I had heard about several boat graves being buried in one burial mound, but never about a boat that had been buried inside another boat,” NTNU archaeologist Raymond Sauvage, the project manager for the dig, told ScienceNorway. “I have since learned that a few double boat graves were found in the 1950s, at Tjølling, in the south of the Norwegian county of Vestfold. Still, this is essentially an unknown phenomenon.”

Most of the wood is gone from the two boats, but the archaeologists found the remaining rivets in their original positions, allowing them to visualize the placement of the boat graves. The boats were buried together within a large burial mound that protruded from the landscape. The site is at the edge of a cliff overlooking a fjord, so it was likely an impressive view, according to Sauvage.

Flooded Venice had tourists taking selfies and residents in tears

  Flooded Venice had tourists taking selfies and residents in tears There’s a sense that life in one of the world’s most improbable and spellbinding cities is becoming unviable.  “The reaction is to cry,” said Flavia Feletti, 77, who has lived in Venice for six decades. “I am afraid there is no solution. When I went out the day after the flooding, I met a kind of funeral in the city.” Venice has thrived since the 5th century by taming the water all around it. In recent decades, even as the land has been sinking while the sea level has been rising, many Venetians figured the city would again find a way to evolve and hang on.

I know they buried people in ships, but why did they do it? The Vikings , and related groups like the Anglo-Saxons, sometimes did bury their ships, other times, they lit them ablaze and adrift (doesn't The use of a boat or a wagon during the cremation (or burial) appears to have been largely a practice

ARCHAEOLOGISTS have discovered “unusual” boat graves in Norway which saw two high ranking members buried in the same spot – more than 100 years a part. The vikings then placed the new boat grave inside the old one, and re-burried the two . Why they did this, experts are currently unsure.

Few details were given about the man, but he was found buried alongside his shield and a single-edged sword. His weapon dates to the Merovingian era in Northern Europe, reports ScienceNorway.

a piece of food: The cross-shaped pendant found in the woman’s grave. © Image: Raymond Sauvage, NTNU Vitenskapsmuseet The cross-shaped pendant found in the woman’s grave.

The woman’s boat was around 7 to 8 meters (23 to 26 feet) long. She was buried wearing a necklace with a cross-shaped pendant, and her dress was fastened at the front with a pair of large shell-shaped brooches made from gilded bronze. Around her body lay an assortment of funerary items, including a pearl necklace, scissors, a spindle whorl, and the head of a cow.

The soil where the boat graves were found was not amenable to preserving bodily remains, but the scientists were able to extract a piece of the woman’s skull, which could yield DNA and provide the material for an isotopic analysis, the latter of which determine diet and place of origin.

It’s quite possible these two individuals were related, despite being separated by 100 years. The Viking community would’ve likely known the original occupant of the boat grave, according to the archaeologists. Vikings didn’t keep written records, but family knowledge could be passed down from generation to generation.

The Long-Forgotten Flight That Sent Boeing Off Course

  The Long-Forgotten Flight That Sent Boeing Off Course A company once driven by engineers became driven by finance.In the plane’s trailing vortices was greater Seattle, where the company’s famed engineering culture had taken root; where the bulk of its 40,000-plus engineers lived and worked; indeed, where the jet itself had been assembled. But it was May 2001. And Boeing’s leaders, CEO Phil Condit and President Harry Stonecipher, had decided it was time to put some distance between themselves and the people actually making the company’s planes. How much distance? This flight—a PR stunt to end the two-month contest for Boeing’s new headquarters—would reveal the answer.

Two people died roughly 100 years apart . It is only when the boat is buried that the Vinjeøra Vikings do something that will intrigue archaeologists more than 1000 years into the future. Who were the two and why were they buried together, even though they died 100 years apart ?

The boat burial practices of the Viking people of Scandinavia from the 7th to 10th centuries are famous. The keel of the smaller boat remained intact and in place, as did the metal studs used to construct the boats . That's how the archaeologists were able to reconstruct where the vessels had lain.

a necklace with a kite: Georadar scan of a 1,000-year-old Viking ship found in Romsdal county in Norway © Image: NIKU Georadar scan of a 1,000-year-old Viking ship found in Romsdal county in Norway

Extensive farming over the years has largely erased the burial mound, but the team has plans to return to the site next summer to search for more artifacts.

In related news, an archaeological team from the Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research (NIKU) and other institutions has used ground-penetrating radar to detect traces of a 1,000-year-old Viking ship buried in Møre of Romsdal county, Norway. The ship is estimated to be around 16 to 17 meters in length. The georadar may have also detected the signs of an ancient settlement, but more research is needed to be sure.

Man charged with trafficking over Essex lorry deaths .
A man has been charged with human trafficking following the deaths of 39 Vietnamese people in a lorry in Essex. Christopher Kennedy, 23, who was arrested on Friday 22 November in connection with the police investigation, is accused of conspiracy to arrange or facilitate the travel of people with a view to exploitation and conspiracy to facilitate the commission of a breach of UK immigration law.Kennedy, of Corkley Road in Darkley, County Armagh, Northern Ireland, is due to appear at Chelmsford Magistrates' Court on Monday 25 November.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 6
This is interesting!