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US News What You Won’t Hear About the London Bridge Attacks

05:10  09 december  2019
05:10  09 december  2019 Source:   msn.com

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By the time the 2017 London Bridge attack happened, less than a week before that year’s vote, May’s “strong and stable” image was in tatters. The reaction to Friday’s attack captured the dilemma facing many voters about the two party leaders. If the risk with Johnson is that he’ll say anything to get

(Bloomberg Opinion) -- There’s an important debate to be had after Friday’s terrorist attack on London Bridge : At what point is it safe to release a prisoner convicted of terrorism back into the public? There’s no chance of that debate taking place now in the final throes of a bitterly contested U.K

  What You Won’t Hear About the London Bridge Attacks © Getty Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

There’s an important debate to be had after Friday’s terrorist attack on London Bridge: At what point is it safe to release a prisoner convicted of terrorism back into the public? There’s no chance of that debate taking place now in the final throes of a bitterly contested U.K. general election campaign. Instead there’s an unseemly blame game.

A known terrorist was released from prison having served less than half his sentence, and went on a killing rampage at a conference dedicated to rehabilitating criminals. He murdered two young graduates who’d devoted their career to that cause. No wonder there’s shock and anger. No wonder too that, 10 days before the national vote, neither the Conservative nor Labour parties want to accept the responsibility.

Tens of thousands evacuated or stranded following London Bridge attack

  Tens of thousands evacuated or stranded following London Bridge attack Today’s terror attack on London Bridge evoked memories of the 2017 tragedy for the tens of thousands of people who were evacuated or left stranded. A suspect was shot dead by armed officers on the north side of the bridge after several people were stabbed. The Met later declared it a terrorist incident. Officers immediately shut all routes leading to the bridge from the capital’s financial district. Thousands of people came streaming down Cannon Street as police officers, some armed and with dogs, roared: “Clear the road!”. The cordon was gradually moved further away from the bridge.

Dec 03 2019, 1:10 PMDec 03 2019, 7:33 PMDecember 03 2019, 1:10 PMDecember 03 2019, 7:33 PM. (Bloomberg Opinion) -- There’s an important debate to be had after Friday’s terrorist attack on London Bridge : At what point is it safe to release a prisoner convicted of terrorism back into the pu

How the events unfolded at London Bridge two years ago and who was caught up in the terror attack . When it reached the northern end of the bridge , police said it made a U-turn and mounted the pavement. It then crossed the bridge again, ploughing into pedestrians, including three of those

Usman Khan’s rampage was a grim echo of the 2017 terrorist attacks during the last election, in which 22 people were killed at a pop concert in Manchester and eight people were later murdered in the London Bridge area. After the Manchester incident, campaigning was suspended as the nation mourned. Prime Minister Theresa May gave a dignified speech that sought to unite the country rather than pursue political advantage.

Four days later, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn took the gloves off. He infuriated Conservatives by linking the attacks to “wars our government has supported or fought in other countries.” And he blamed austerity for understaffed hospital emergency wards and shortages in police numbers.

  What You Won’t Hear About the London Bridge Attacks © AP Though the Tories are considered the stronger party on law and order, his criticism damaged May. She led a government that had been in power for seven years, and which had cut public funding, and as a former home secretary she’d been responsible for security. By the time the 2017 London Bridge attack happened, less than a week before that year’s vote, May’s “strong and stable” image was in tatters.

London Bridge attack: heroes and eyewitensses speak of their terror

  London Bridge attack: heroes and eyewitensses speak of their terror One eyewitness watched as she was stuck on a bus on London Bridge with her one-year-old baby when she witnessed what she at first thought was a fight.She explained to the BBC: "I was on the bus coming southbound we just pulled away from the bus stop when the bus came to a sudden stop because there were people running across the bridge into the road looking over their shoulders and filming behind them."We looked over and it looked as if there was a fight going on and people tussling with each other."A few men together, all with dark jackets.

The victims of the London Bridge attack were Frenchmen Xavier Thomas, 45, and Alexandre Pigeard, 26, Sara Zelenak, 21, Ignacio Echeverria, 39, Kirsty Boden The coroner’s court also heard details will be given about how much the domestic intelligence agency MI5 knew about the attackers before the

London Bridge attack : Terror police shoot man after stabbing. 1/29. Bystanders and police surrounding a person at the scene of an incident on London This comment has been deleted. About The Independent commenting. Independent Premium Comments can be posted by members of our

This time there was no dignified pause. After Friday’s attack, May’s successor Boris Johnson immediately called for tougher sentencing and pinned Khan’s release from prison on a Labour-era policy, even as the family of one of Friday’s victims, Jack Merritt, lambasted the prime minister for exploiting the 25-year-old’s death for political gain.

Corbyn largely reprised his 2017 line. In a defense policy speech ahead of this week’s NATO summit, he noted that “Britain’s repeated military interventions in North Africa and the wider Middle East, including Afghanistan, have exacerbated rather than resolved the problems.” Mindful of the U.S. president’s visit to the U.K. this week, Corbyn threw in a warning that Britain risks being “tied to Donald Trump’s coat-tails” under Johnson.

The Labour leader was careful to note that “the blame lies with the terrorists, their funders and recruiters”; but he surely hoped that he’d grab the attention of voters by reminding them of Britain’s foreign policies under previous governments — policies he’d opposed. The problem for Corbyn is that his responses to terrorism often make voters, and Britain’s allies, nervous about his commitment to security.

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Khuram Shazad Butt, one the London Bridge attackers recently identified by police, appeared in a Channel 4 documentary called ‘The Jihadist Next Door’ last year. Police were reportedly alerted after he was filmed praying behind a jihadist Black Standard and attempting to recruit children at a local park.

Witnesses of the London Bridge and Borough Market attacks have described the horrific events that unfolded shortly after 10pm on a busy Saturday night. Liam, who was in a flat above Southwark Tavern next to London Bridge , told BBC Radio 5 Live he heard screaming and saw people running

The truth about Khan is more complicated than either Johnson or Corbyn want to acknowledge. At 19, he was part of a militant Salafi jihadi organization in blue-collar Stoke-on-Trent. He linked up with other jihadi groups and caught the attention of the security services. He was jailed in 2012 for planning acts of terrorism against the London Stock Exchange and other British locations, and for planning a training camp in Kashmir.

Related: Terror returns to London Bridge (Photos)

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His original sentence under the U.K.’s controversial “Imprisonment for Public Protection” guidelines would have kept him incarcerated until a Parole Board was satisfied he posed no threat. Thousands of low-level criminals were held under the same rules with little chance of release or rehabilitation. The sentencing policy was declared illegal by the European Court of Human Rights in 2012 and changed by the Conservative government.

In 2013, an appeal court converted Khan’s sentence to a 16-year “extended sentence.” But under a 2008 Labour government policy meant to reduce prison overpopulation, offenders under extended jail terms were released automatically halfway through their sentences. While that law was changed by the Tories in 2012 to require inmates to serve two-thirds of the sentence and to win Parole Board approval for release, Khan’s sentencing fell under the previous policy.

There are surely lessons here. Khan’s original arrest and conviction shows the importance of well-funded intelligence and police work; his subsequent attack shows that proper parole reviews are vital — although, as the appeal decision demonstrated, they can never be fail-safe. Johnson is right to order a review of others with similar convictions who’ve been released without Parole Board approval. And yet the idea that tougher sentencing and more policing is all that’s needed is dangerously simplistic.

It’s a cruel irony that Khan’s rampage took place at a conference organized by a Cambridge University program for prison-based education. Such programs can help redress the widespread problem of re-offending. Indeed, two of those who risked their lives to tackle Khan were convicted offenders, one of whom who now works for prison reform. And yet, as Jack Merritt’s father fears, Johnson’s response is likely to cool support for such programs.

The narrow argument around sentencing guidelines also misses the bigger picture of a criminal justice system that has suffered from resource shortfalls and policy failures. And it avoids the thornier subject of how best to counter radicalization and extremism, both in prisons and in society. That requires a broader suite of policies — from community-based prevention programs, to intelligence gathering to better policing — than Johnson’s framing of the problem acknowledges and far better government leadership.

The reaction to Friday’s attack captured the dilemma facing many voters about the two party leaders. If the risk with Johnson is that he’ll say anything to get elected, the worry about Corbyn is that he means exactly what he says. One has done nothing to earn voters’ trust; the other nothing to win their confidence.

These are some of the thorniest security issues facing any British government. At the business end of an election campaign, don’t expect a real discussion of any of it.


Jeffrey Epstein, Blackmail and a Lucrative ‘Hot List’ .
Soon after the sex criminal Jeffrey Epstein died in August, a mysterious man met with two prominent lawyers. Soon after the sex criminal Jeffrey Epstein died in August, a mysterious man met with two prominent lawyers.

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