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US News Boeing Mocked Lion Air’s Calls for 737 Max Training Before Deadly Crash

12:30  14 january  2020
12:30  14 january  2020 Source:   msn.com

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It is the deadliest accident in Lion Air ' s 18-year history, surpassing the 2004 crash in Surakarta that killed 25, and the second deadliest aircraft accident in As a result, the United States Federal Aviation Administration and Boeing issued warnings and training advisories to all operators of the 737 MAX

Indonesia’ s Lion Air considered putting its pilots through simulator training before flying the Boeing Co. 737 Max but abandoned the “Now friggin Lion Air might need a sim to fly the MAX , and maybe because of their own stupidity. I’m scrambling trying to figure out how to unscrew this now! idiots,” one

(Bloomberg) -- Indonesia’s Lion Air considered putting its pilots through simulator training before flying the Boeing Co. 737 Max but abandoned the idea after the planemaker convinced them in 2017 it was unnecessary, according to people familiar with the matter and internal company communications.

The next year, 189 people died when a Lion Air 737 Max plunged into the Java Sea, a disaster blamed in part on inadequate training and the crew’s unfamiliarity with a new flight-control feature on the Max that malfunctioned.

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Lion Air crash : Pilots fought automatic safety system before plane plunged. The pilots subsequently engaged in a futile "The Lion Air flight was a big deal for Boeing , but they managed to overcome it," Schiavo says. "They put out the emergency warning about training , and the industry went on.

The Boeing 737 , owned by the low-cost airline Lion Air , went down after taking off from the capital Jakarta. The cause of the crash , which involved a plane that had been in operation since August, remains unclear. The incident is reported to be the first major accident involving a Boeing 737 Max

Related: How Boeing tried to play dirty and kill a great aeroplane - and got outplayed

a group of people standing next to a truck: Lion Air Flight Crashes Into Sea Off Jakarta © Getty Images via Bloomberg Lion Air Flight Crashes Into Sea Off Jakarta

Indonesian rescue crews recover the wrecked engine from Lion Air flight JT 610 on Nov. 4, 2018.

Boeing employees had expressed alarm among themselves over the possibility that one of the company’s largest customers might require its pilots to undergo costly simulator training before flying the new 737 model, according to internal messages that have been released to the media. Those messages, included in the more than 100 pages of internal Boeing communications that the company provided to lawmakers and the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration and released widely on Thursday, had Lion Air’s name redacted.

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The day before the crash of Lion Air flight 610, the first deadly crash of a Boeing 737 MAX 8 plane, a third off-duty pilot saved the same plane from crashing The third pilot on the near-fatal Lion Air flight was riding in the cockpit jump seat as a so- called “dead head” pilot. He was able to jump into action

As the Lion Air crew fought to control their diving Boeing Co. 737 Max 8, they got help from an unexpected source: an off-duty pilot who happened to be riding in the cockpit. Pilot Who Hitched a Ride Saved Lion Air 737 Day Before Deadly Crash .

But the House committee provided excerpts of those messages to Bloomberg News that un-redacted the Indonesian carrier’s name.

Related: Lion Air crash (Photos)

“Now friggin Lion Air might need a sim to fly the MAX, and maybe because of their own stupidity. I’m scrambling trying to figure out how to unscrew this now! idiots,” one Boeing employee wrote in June 2017 text messages obtained by the company and released by the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee.

In response, a Boeing colleague replied: “WHAT THE F%$&!!!! But their sister airline is already flying it!” That was an apparent reference to Malindo Air, the Malaysian-based carrier that was the first to fly the Max commercially.

Doing simulator training would have undercut a critical selling point of the jet: that airlines would be able to allow crews trained on an older 737 version to fly the Max after just a brief computer course.

In a report on the Oct. 29, 2018 accident, Indonesia’s National Transportation Safety Committee cited a failure by Boeing to tell pilots about the new flight-control feature on the jet, called MCAS, and the need to provide training on it so that pilots would be able to better respond to malfunctions.

a group of cockpit: Lion Air Boeing Max 8 Aircraft Grounded At Jakarta International Airport © Bloomberg Lion Air Boeing Max 8 Aircraft Grounded At Jakarta International Airport

The cockpit of a grounded Lion Air Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft in Indonesia.

The report also cited shortfalls in the crew’s ability to perform emergency check lists, fly the plane manually and communicate about the emergency. The copilot, who took nearly four minutes to look up an emergency procedure he was supposed to have memorized, was singled out for repeated failures during training.

The 737 Max was grounded worldwide last March after an Ethiopian Airlines plane crashed following a similar MCAS malfunction.

To be sure, simulator training that didn’t address a malfunction of the system like the one crews in both disasters encountered might not have saved the jets. Separate decisions had been made not to inform pilots about MCAS, something that has drawn sharp criticism from pilots’ unions in the U.S.

But the prospect of simulator training for Max pilots -- and opposition to it within Boeing -- were major themes in the latest batch of embarrassing internal company messages released last week.

Lion Air has declined to comment whether it was the carrier discussed in the messages released last week by Boeing but people familiar with the exchanges, who asked not to be identified discussing a private matter, said Lion Air had initially raised concerns about the need for simulator training on the Max but ultimately accepted Boeing’s recommendation that it was unnecessary.

a large passenger jet sitting on top of a runway: Lion Air Boeing Max 8 Aircraft Grounded At Jakarta International Airport © Bloomberg Lion Air Boeing Max 8 Aircraft Grounded At Jakarta International Airport

A grounded Lion Air Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft at the Soekarno-Hatta Airport in Cenkareng, Indonesia in 2019.

Some of the messages revealed the pressure on employees -- and customers -- to avoid the additional training. Boeing’s resistance to simulator training for Lion Air pilots was reported earlier by Forbes.

Boeing didn’t respond to a request for comment but said last week that “any potential safety deficiencies identified in the documents have been addressed.”

“These documents do not represent the best of Boeing,” Greg Smith, the company’s interim CEO, said in a message to employees Friday. “The tone and language of the messages are inappropriate, particularly when used in discussion of such important matters, and they do not reflect who we are as a company or the culture we’ve created.”

Technical Pilot

The communications include a 2017 email from Boeing’s chief technical pilot on the 737 in which he crowed to colleagues: “Looks like my jedi mind trick worked again!” The email was sent two days after the earlier messages expressing alarm about Lion Air potentially demanding simulator training.

Attached was a forwarded email exchange in which the person warned an unnamed recipient against offering simulator training for Max pilots, pushing instead for the computer-based course that regulators had already approved for flight crews transitioning to the Max from earlier 737 models.

“I am concerned that if [redacted] chooses to require a Max simulator for its pilots beyond what all other regulators are requiring that it will be creating a difficult and unnecessary training burden for your airline, as well as potentially establish a precedent in your region for other Max customers,” the Boeing pilot wrote in the forwarded message.

While Lion Air was not identified in the redacted emails, the discussions are consistent with those Boeing held with Lion Air at the time, according to people familiar with the matter.

--With assistance from Alan Levin and Julie Johnsson.

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