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US News Bushfire smoke plume destined to reach Australia again after circling the globe, NASA predicts

19:25  14 january  2020
19:25  14 january  2020 Source:   abc.net.au

Bushfire smoke plume destined to reach Australia again after circling the globe, NASA predicts

  Bushfire smoke plume destined to reach Australia again after circling the globe, NASA predicts If you thought the bushfire smoke was finally starting to clear, NASA says we might be in for more — but from the same plume, which is circumnavigating the globe.NASA is predicting smoke from the country's devastating bushfires will make it all the way around the world, with the potential to move over Australian skies again in the coming days.

NASA is predicting smoke from the country's devastating bushfires will make it all the way around the world "The smoke is expected to make at least one full circuit around the globe , returning once "I would expect the smoke to have completely circled the globe and be visible above southern parts of

NASA is predicting smoke from the country's devastating bushfires will make it all the way around the world, with the potential to move over Australian skies again in the coming "The smoke is expected to make at least one full circuit around the globe , returning once again to the skies over Australia ."

A special message from MSN:

We’re committed to help support relief efforts after the devastating Australian bushfires. You can donate directly here, and read more here.

NASA is predicting smoke from the country's devastating bushfires will make it all the way around the world, with the potential to move over Australian skies again in the coming days.

However, one expert has said it may not be visible to the naked eye.

Several Australian cities have already been blanketed with smoke during the bushfire crisis in the past few weeks, including Canberra, Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney, where air quality was rated at its "worst ever" in mid-December.

NASA satellites reveal smoke from Australian bushfires will take MONTHS to disperse as plumes of smoke sit as high as 20km in the atmosphere

  NASA satellites reveal smoke from Australian bushfires will take MONTHS to disperse as plumes of smoke sit as high as 20km in the atmosphere On Wednesday, US space agency NASA revealed that it will be months before bushfire smoke clears since plumes are sitting so high the atmosphere.A special message from MSN: We’re committed to help support relief efforts after the devastating Australian bushfires. You can donate directly here, and read more here.

09:17 13 january 2020 Source: abc.net.au. Bushfire smoke plume destined to reach Australia again after circling the globe , NASA predicts 2020-01-13 NASA is predicting smoke from the country's devastating bushfires will make it all the way around the world, with the potential to move over

If you thought the bushfire smoke was finally starting to clear, NASA says we might be in for more — but from the same plume , which is circumnavigating the globe .

Satellite imaging tracking the progress of a smoke plume shows it drifting out over the Tasman Sea and then to the Pacific Ocean.

a small boat in a body of water: Sydney was blanketed in bushfire smoke in December. (Supplied: Catherine Taylor) © Provided by ABC NEWS Sydney was blanketed in bushfire smoke in December. (Supplied: Catherine Taylor)

"Over the past week, NASA satellites have observed an extraordinary amount of smoke injected into the atmosphere from the Australian fires and its subsequent eastward dispersal," the agency said on its website.

"The smoke is expected to make at least one full circuit around the globe, returning once again to the skies over Australia."

NASA has been monitoring the movement of smoke from the Australian bushfires for at least the past fortnight, during which time the plume has crossed the Tasman Sea.

Australian bushfire smoke drifts to South America - WMO

  Australian bushfire smoke drifts to South America - WMO Australian bushfire smoke drifts to South America - WMOGENEVA (Reuters) - Smoke from wildfires in Australia has drifted across the Pacific and affected cities in South America, and may have reached the Antarctic, the U.N. World Meteorological Organization said on Tuesday.

NSW bushfire smoke blew into the ACT causing dangerous pollution, leading to one death. NASA satellite imagery on 4th January 2020 showing bushfires on southeast coast of Australia . At the time, the smoke spread eastward and reached Tasman Sea. On 7 September 2019 multiple out of

Smoke from huge fires is expected to travel back to Australia after circling the globe , Nasa says. Nasa said plumes from blazes around New Year's Day had crossed South America, turning skies Hundreds of bushfires have burnt across Australia , killing at least 28 people and destroying more

"The smoke is having a dramatic impact on New Zealand, causing severe air quality issues across the country and visibly darkening mountain-top snow," the agency said.

NASA said the intense heat from bushfires across Australia — including New South Wales, Victoria, the Adelaide Hills and Kangaroo Island — had triggered fire-induced thunderstorms.

Map © ABC Map

University of New South Wales astrophysicist Lisa Harvey-Smith has been following the plume's progress through NASA images.

She said it would not be long before the smoke was travelling in Australian airspace again.

"I would expect the smoke to have completely circled the globe and be visible above southern parts of WA in the next few days, probably not at ground level but high in the atmosphere," Professor Harvey-Smith said.

Smoke particles could do 'several loops'

Professor Harvey-Smith said the smoke cloud had "already enveloped around three quarters of the world" and was being pushed along by thunderstorms generated by the fires, and had reached 17 kilometres above sea level.

Australia's bushfire-stricken east welcomes drenching rain

  Australia's bushfire-stricken east welcomes drenching rain Australia's bushfire-stricken east welcomes drenching rainA special message from MSN: We’re committed to help support relief efforts after the devastating Australian bushfires. You can donate directly here, and read more here.

As devastating bushfires rage on in Australia , covering an area twice the size of Wales and incinerating some 500 million animals, forecasters are predicting the worst is yet to come, forcing record evacuations in the east. Forecasters are predicting even worse on Saturday.

How Australia has been battling bushfires during a devastating fire season. Although recent cooler conditions have brought some respite, the states of New South Wales and Victoria are once again braced for the return of severe fire danger - with high temperatures and gusty winds forecast over the

"Being at that high altitude allows the smoke to travel relatively unimpeded, above most of the atmosphere and weather," she said.

ABC News Breakfast weather presenter Nate Byrne said as the smoke would likely become diluted as it crossed over in South America, meaning the plume may not be visible once it reaches Australia again.

Maps © ABC Maps

"The old thinking was that the solution to pollution was dilution," he said.

"But in the case of these fires — they are so huge, they are still burning, and will be burning for quite some time — there's a constant of supply of smoke particles into the air.

"By the time the wind gets all the way back around to the west of Australia, it's spent a lot of time being mixed with clean air from higher up or lower down in the atmosphere, so you won't see the thick smoke like you'd see right next to the fire.

Bushfire smoke © ABC Bushfire smoke

"Most likely the only way we'll be able to detect it is from satellites."

However, Byrne said it was still possible that Perth locals might notice a "hazy day" soon.

He said while it did not appear to have reached the west coast just yet, it probably would "within days".

Town destroyed by Australia's deadliest bushfire faces new threat

  Town destroyed by Australia's deadliest bushfire faces new threat It is more than a decade since Black Saturday. In February 2009 a bushfire ripped through the area surrounding Kinglake, a town not far north of Melbourne. It killed 173 people and remains Australia's deadliest bushfire incident. But Kinglake is at risk again.Mikey Libreri has lived in the town his entire life. He takes me through the dry bush around his house and points to the ridge."The flame height about 300 metres from here was up to half a kilometre high.

NASA is predicting a plume of smoke from the country's devastating bushfires will travel around the globe , with the potential to This is Victoria's chief health officer Dr Brett Sutton and Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews speaking about the smoke and the ongoing bushfire crisis at a press conference.

Smoke from Australia 's deadly bushfires is circling the globe and will make it BACK to the Scientists have predicted the smoke will make the 40,075km journey around the globe and return to 'Over the past week, NASA satellites have observed an extraordinary amount of smoke injected

"Smoke particles don't disappear — they have to be removed from the air somehow," he said.

"The more smoke particles there are in the air, the more likely it is that some will be able to make it all the way around the Earth and, in fact, maybe do several loops.

"Just like when you see really huge volcanic explosions, the ash from those can travel several times around the globe and cause havoc for quite some time."

Pictures: Australia’s most deadly and destructive bushfires

a red fire engine is parked in the grass: Wildfires have ravaged the Australian landscape since time immemorial, and while these blazes can be a natural part of the nation's ecology, they often result in devastating loss of life and serious injuries, as well as damage to property and swathes of farmland. Worryingly, experts warn that climate change is turning parts of the country into a tinderbox, exacerbating bushfire risk. As multiple infernos rage through the east coast, we take a look back in time at the most catastrophic conflagrations ever.

MSN UK is committed to Empowering the Planet and taking urgent action to protect our environment against the climate crisis. We’re supporting those on the front line tackling the Australian bushfire crisis. Find out more about our campaign here.

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