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US News NASA satellites reveal smoke from Australian bushfires will take MONTHS to disperse as plumes of smoke sit as high as 20km in the atmosphere

07:45  15 january  2020
07:45  15 january  2020 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

Bushfire smoke plume destined to reach Australia again after circling the globe, NASA predicts

  Bushfire smoke plume destined to reach Australia again after circling the globe, NASA predicts If you thought the bushfire smoke was finally starting to clear, NASA says we might be in for more — but from the same plume, which is circumnavigating the globe.NASA is predicting smoke from the country's devastating bushfires will make it all the way around the world, with the potential to move over Australian skies again in the coming days.

Smoke caused by the ongoing Australian bushfires will take months to completely disperse in the atmosphere . Given that some smoke is 20 km high in the atmosphere , it On Wednesday, it was revealed that smoke has been detected as high as 20 kilometres in the atmosphere , meaning that

Smoke from fires has become a major hazard. The Australian capital Canberra - part of an administrative Satellite images from 4 January show the spread of smoke from fires in Victoria and NSW Although Australia has always had bushfires , this season has been a lot worse than normal.

(Video by Newsy)

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We’re committed to help support relief efforts after the devastating Australian bushfires. You can donate directly here, and read more here.

Bushfire smoke plume destined to reach Australia again after circling the globe, NASA predicts

  Bushfire smoke plume destined to reach Australia again after circling the globe, NASA predicts If you thought the bushfire smoke was finally starting to clear, NASA says we might be in for more — but from the same plume, which is circumnavigating the globe.NASA is predicting smoke from the country's devastating bushfires will make it all the way around the world, with the potential to move over Australian skies again in the coming days.

Researchers from NASA said the smoke has led to an unusually large number of pyrocumulonimbus (pyrCbs) events, or fire-induced thunderstorms, to form in the skies. These clouds, which act like thunderstorms but do not have precipitation, have formed due to the “searing heat combined with

2019–20 Australian bushfire season. NASA satellite imagery on 7 December 2019 showing bushfires across the east NSW bushfire smoke blew into the ACT causing dangerous pollution, leading to one death. Because of the bushfires occurring in the surrounding regions, the Sydney

NASA satellites have revealed that smoke from Australian bushfires will take months to fully disperse into the atmosphere.  

The US space agency used its satellite fleet and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) technology to track the height of an enormous smoke cloud, which also revealed how long it would take for it to dissipate.

Australian bushfire smoke drifts to South America - WMO

  Australian bushfire smoke drifts to South America - WMO Australian bushfire smoke drifts to South America - WMOGENEVA (Reuters) - Smoke from wildfires in Australia has drifted across the Pacific and affected cities in South America, and may have reached the Antarctic, the U.N. World Meteorological Organization said on Tuesday.

Australia, its bushfires , and smoke plumes are easily visible. An animation by the Himawari-8 Himawari-8's view of the Australian bushfires and smoke clouds on January 2. Melbourne is visible in the The European Space Agency's Sentinel-2 satellite took this image of growing bushfires while

Image copyright NASA . Image caption Bushfire smoke as seen the International Space Station. Nasa said plumes from blazes around New Year's Day had crossed South America, turning skies there hazy These had sent smoke soaring into the stratosphere, with some recorded as high as 17.7km

While low-lying smoke takes a short time to disperse, smoke that is higher up in the atmosphere takes much longer to scatter. 

During a six-day period, smoke peaked in height on January 1 while it was hanging over New Zealand (pictured) at 17.7 kilometres (11 miles) above the ground. Pictured: The height of the smoke cloud on New Years Day © Provided by Daily Mail During a six-day period, smoke peaked in height on January 1 while it was hanging over New Zealand (pictured) at 17.7 kilometres (11 miles) above the ground. Pictured: The height of the smoke cloud on New Years Day

On Wednesday, it was revealed that smoke has been detected as high as 20 kilometres in the atmosphere, meaning that it will take months to clear up.  

The particular smoke cloud that was tracked by NASA was caused by bushfires that burnt between late December and early January.

Currently, the huge plume of smoke is doing a loop of the Southern Hemisphere and is travelling back to Australia after passing New Zealand and South America. 

Australia's bushfire-stricken east welcomes drenching rain

  Australia's bushfire-stricken east welcomes drenching rain Australia's bushfire-stricken east welcomes drenching rainA special message from MSN: We’re committed to help support relief efforts after the devastating Australian bushfires. You can donate directly here, and read more here.

This satellite image provided by NASA on Saturday, January 4, shows smoke from fires burning in A smoke haze blankets Bondi Beach as the air quality index reaches higher than ten times This aerial photo, taken on November 9, shows bushfires in the northeastern part New South Wales.

Satellites from NASA and other agencies are tracking the deadly wildfires from space. Thick clouds of brown smoke from Australia's bushfires spread across the Tasman Sea in this photo captured by an astronaut The image, taken by the Operational Land Imager, exhibits fire in the Goldfields region.

On Wednesday, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) shared a NASA video to its Facebook page, showing the height of smoke from December 31 to January 5.  

Australian Rural Fire Truck in front of Bush fire Australian Rural Fire Truck in front of Bush fire

During the six-day period, smoke peaked in height on January 1 while it was hanging over New Zealand at 17.7 kilometres (11 miles) above the ground. 

Meanwhile, the lowest-lying smoke was 15.9 kilometres (9.9 miles) above the Tasman Sea between Australia and New Zealand on New Years Eve.

a close up of a wave: The lowest lying smoke occurred on December 31, the same day that bushfires were at their peak ferocity. Pictured: A European Space Agency image of bushfires burning on New Years Eve © Provided by Daily Mail The lowest lying smoke occurred on December 31, the same day that bushfires were at their peak ferocity. Pictured: A European Space Agency image of bushfires burning on New Years Eve

In the caption, the BOM explained that it could be some time before smoke gives way to clear skies, not just in Australia but other parts of the Southern Hemisphere where plumes will travel. 

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According to Nasa , smoke from the Australian bushfires will cross the globe. The smoke from Australia’s fires is so vast that fumes from the early weeks of the crisis will survive a Meghan declined to take part in Sandringham summit because she and Harry deemed it 'unnecessary', source reveals .

( NASA ) – Three weeks into November 2019, springtime bush fires continued to blaze across southern and eastern Australian states. According to researchers, the smoke plumes from the Australian fires have risen as high as 12 to 13 kilometers (7 to 8 miles) in the atmosphere .

'Much of the smoke is close to the ground and will dissipate from the atmosphere relatively quickly—with some of the smoke sitting as high as 20 km in the atmosphere and will slowly disperse over a few months,' the caption read.  

On Tuesday, it was first revealed by NASA that plumes of smoke from Australia's bushfires will circle the entire globe and make it back to the nation's skies. 

North of Bamaga, Far North Queensland. North of Bamaga, Far North Queensland.

Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide and Canberra have been blanketed with thick smoke since the bushfire season began in October last year.

The smoke from hundreds of blazes drifted over the Tasman Sea and the Pacific Ocean, coating parts of New Zealand and South America, nearly 11,000km away. 

Scientists have predicted the smoke will make the 40,075km journey around the globe and return to the bushfire-ravaged country. 

Gallery: Climate protests around the world amid Australian wildfires (Reuters)

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MSN UK is committed to Empowering the Planet and taking urgent action to protect our environment against the climate crisis. We’re supporting those on the front line tackling the Australian bushfire crisis. Find out more about our campaign here.

 

Journalist falls for Australian drop bear prank while covering Kangaroo Island bushfires .
When a Scottish journalist was asked if she wanted to hold an elusive Australian "drop bear" during the Kangaroo Island bushfire crisis, she jumped at the chance, bringing some much-needed laughter amid the bushfire crisis.A special message from MSN: We’re committed to help support relief efforts after the devastating Australian bushfires. You can donate directly here, and read more here.

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