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US News Climber, 39, becomes first Briton to conquer Antarctic mountain only ten people had ever seen

02:25  28 january  2020
02:25  28 january  2020 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

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An explorer has become the first Briton to climb the world’ s remotest mountain – one so isolated only ten people have ever seen it. The adventurer, 39 , from Staveley, Cumbria, said: ‘ I ’ve been on a lot of challenging adventures but this was another level. ‘The mountain is as remote as you can get.

A RELENTLESS adventurer has become the first Briton to scale the world’ s remotest peak - only ever seen by ten people . Leo Houlding, from Cumbria, successfully scaled the mountain peak in Antarctica named Spectre, which lies 280 miles south of the South Pole.

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An explorer has become the first Briton to climb the world’s remotest mountain – one so isolated only ten people have ever seen it.

Leo Houlding battled 1,250 miles across Antarctica in sub-zero temperatures and gales to reach Spectre, a jagged peak near the South Pole.

He became only the third person to reach its 6,630ft summit, and the first to have completed the expedition by reaching the mountain by land without the use of a vehicle.

a couple of people that are standing in the snow: Leo Houlding (right) battled 1,250 miles across Antarctica in sub-zero temperatures and gales to reach Spectre, a jagged peak near the South Pole. Even before Mr Houlding and his team – consisting of Frenchman Jean Burgun and New Zealander Mark Sedon – got there they had to trek across Antarctica © Provided by Daily Mail Leo Houlding (right) battled 1,250 miles across Antarctica in sub-zero temperatures and gales to reach Spectre, a jagged peak near the South Pole. Even before Mr Houlding and his team – consisting of Frenchman Jean Burgun and New Zealander Mark Sedon – got there they had to trek across Antarctica

The adventurer, 39, from Staveley, Cumbria, said: ‘I’ve been on a lot of challenging adventures but this was another level.

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Adventurer Leo Houlding, 39 , successfully conquered Spectre - a jagged mountain peak in © Mark Sedon / SWNS Leo became only the third person ever to reach the summit, the first Brit , and Leo added: "We were the first to people ever to climb in the transarctic mountains without government

An explorer has become the first Briton to climb the world’ s remotest mountain – one so isolated only ten people have ever seen it. He became only the third person to reach its 6,630ft summit, and the first to have completed the expedition by reaching the mountain by land without the use of a

‘The mountain is as remote as you can get. There is a science base at the South Pole about 280 miles away. You have to go via there to get to Spectre. It’s the most remote mountain in the world, when you are that far out you are completely self-reliant – no one is coming to help if things go wrong.’

Climbing Spectre, which was only discovered in 1934, presents a unique challenge to mountaineers with its series of icy granite peaks. 

a man riding skis down a snow covered mountain: He became only the third person to reach its 6,630ft summit, and the first to have completed the expedition by reaching the mountain by land without the use of a vehicle. The adventurer is pictured above on an ice throne made of skis and snow © Provided by Daily Mail He became only the third person to reach its 6,630ft summit, and the first to have completed the expedition by reaching the mountain by land without the use of a vehicle. The adventurer is pictured above on an ice throne made of skis and snow

But even before Mr Houlding and his team – consisting of Frenchman Jean Burgun and New Zealander Mark Sedon – got there they had to trek across Antarctica.

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Adventurer Leo Houlding has become the first Briton to scale the world’ s remotest peak, so isolated only 10 people have ever seen it. The explorer successfully conquered Spectre - a jagged mountain peak in Antarctica , 280 miles south of the South Pole. Just to get there the 39 -year-old battled

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Mr Houlding said: ‘Getting there was the greatest part of the challenge. We kite-skied for 1,250 miles with 31 stone of kit each. You need a lot of equipment to survive.

‘When we arrived it was -40C with winds of 60 knots, that gives a windchill of -73C. That’s instant frostbite. You can freeze to death in minutes. Even walking in that environment is a challenge, so you can imagine how hard it was to climb a vertical cliff face.’

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Mr Houlding and his partners – who became the fourth and fifth people to scale Spectre – are only the second team to climb the peak after American geologist brothers Edmund and Mugs Stump in 1980.

He said: ‘There are only a few places in the world where you find such mountains and most are well know to climbers, but no one has even heard of Spectre... It’s almost frustrating the two scientists who discovered it were climbers, or we’d have been the first.’

a man riding on top of a rocky mountain: He became only the third person to reach its 6,630ft summit, and the first to have completed the expedition by reaching the mountain by land without the use of a vehicle. Mr Houlding is pictured on Spectre Mountain © Provided by Daily Mail He became only the third person to reach its 6,630ft summit, and the first to have completed the expedition by reaching the mountain by land without the use of a vehicle. Mr Houlding is pictured on Spectre Mountain

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