•   
  •   

US News 40m 'tower block' of ice splits from glacier

12:25  06 february  2020
12:25  06 february  2020 Source:   news.sky.com

Grenfell refurbishment firms expressed no trace of responsibility, inquiry told

  Grenfell refurbishment firms expressed no trace of responsibility, inquiry told The second phase of the investigation into the disaster opened on Monday.The second phase of the investigation into the disaster opened on Monday and will consider how the high-rise block came to be wrapped in flammable cladding, which phase one found was the “principal” reason for the rapid spread of flames.

A tower block of ice has split off from a glacier less than a mile away from a ship on which Sky News is filming scientists as they track the impact of climate change. The huge slab, at least 40 metres high and weighing thousands of tonnes, toppled from the William Glacier on Anvers Island, Antarctica.

The moment a tower block of ice broke off from a glacier in Antarctica was captured on camera last week. Scientists on the British Antarctic Survey ship, the James Clark Ross - from which the collapse of the glacier was filmed - estimate that the block weighs thousands of tonnes and is at least 40

Watch: Birth of an iceberg in Antarctica (Sky News)

A tower block of ice has split off from a glacier less than a mile away from a ship on which Sky News is filming scientists as they track the impact of climate change.

The huge slab, at least 40 metres high and weighing thousands of tonnes, toppled from the William Glacier on Anvers Island, Antarctica.

Dramatic footage filmed in the early hours by a crew mate on our British Antarctic Survey ship, the James Clark Ross, shows the berg sliding into the fjord, then spinning almost in slow motion as water and ice cascade down its sides.

Space-time is swirling around a dead star, proving Einstein right again

  Space-time is swirling around a dead star, proving Einstein right again The way the fabric of space and time swirls in a cosmic whirlpool around a dead star has confirmed yet another prediction from Einstein's theory of general relativity, a new study finds. That prediction is a phenomenon known as frame dragging, or the Lense-Thirring effect. It states that space-time will churn around a massive, rotating body. For example, imagine Earth were submerged in honey. As the planet rotated, the honey around it would swirl — and the same holds true with space-time.

A huge tower of ice —which scientists say was at least 130 feet high— split from the William Glacier and crashed into Borgen Bay, Anvers Island in Antarctica.

GIANT STUMP Vs. CAR from 45 m Tower ! Thor's Hammer Vs. Giant LEGO Block from 45m! (20,000 Bricks!)

The birth of the iceberg was part of a collapse that stretched half a mile across the glacier front and lasted for several minutes.

Chief officer Simon Wallace was watching on the bridge.

a boat sitting on top of a snow covered mountain: An expert says the loss of ice is 'significant' © Sky News Screen Grab An expert says the loss of ice is 'significant' He told Sky News: "The whole world started moving. It was hard to take in just how much was going on at the same time.

"The front of the glacier just broke. It was like a sandcastle in the face of the sea. There was a distinct shift to the right and then it seemed to disappear.

"All of a sudden we were confronted by what seemed like a wall of water making its way towards us, but it was the iceberg surfacing a bit like a submarine and rotating at the same time.

"It was incredibly awe-inspiring."

Pluto's frozen nitrogen 'heart' makes the dwarf planet's winds blow

  Pluto's frozen nitrogen 'heart' makes the dwarf planet's winds blow The 'beating heart' of Pluto appears to double as its lungs In contrast to Pluto's mostly pocked and cratered reddish surface, there is an immense bright region, much smoother than the rest, which scientists named Sputnik Planitia. This larger 'lobe' of Pluto's heart - the Tombaugh Regio feature - is like an immense ocean of nitrogen, frozen into rock-solid form by the frigid temperatures that far from the Sun.

Scientists aboard the research vessel James Clark Ross witnessed the event, and said the iceberg weighed thousands of tons and was at least 40 meters high.

Thu 06/02: A tower block of ice has split off from a glacier less than a mile away from a ship on which Sky News is filming scientists as they track the impact of climate change. We’re sorry, the information you’re looking for isn’t available right now.

Our ship, which was barely a mile away at the time, hurriedly left the bay because of the risk of an even more catastrophic event triggering a tsunami.

a snow covered mountain: The huge slab was at least 40 metres high. Pic: John O'Duffy/British Antarctic Survey © Other The huge slab was at least 40 metres high. Pic: John O'Duffy/British Antarctic Survey But a few hours later we returned.

What had been open water was now a carpet of ice covering more than five square miles of the bay, underlining the vast volume of the glacier that had been lost in the event.

Icebergs were still shattering into smaller pieces and capsizing as they found a new centre of gravity.

a large body of water: The William Glacier in Borgen Bay has retreated almost a mile in 20 years © Sky News Screen Grab The William Glacier in Borgen Bay has retreated almost a mile in 20 years Meanwhile, thunderous booms on the glacier strongly suggested that the ice was unstable and liable to calve further.

Calving is when large chunks of ice split off from the end of a glacier.

The William Glacier in Borgen Bay has retreated almost a mile in 20 years, and is one of three areas being studied by scientists over three years as part of the joint UK-Chile 'Icebergs' expedition.

His tale of crossing Antarctica was riveting. But how much was fiction?

  His tale of crossing Antarctica was riveting. But how much was fiction? Colin O’Brady says he crossed Antarctica alone and “unassisted.” Polar experts say he’s embellishing his accomplishments in pursuit of fame.While skiing across Antarctica, American Colin O’Brady, the self-proclaimed first person to ski alone and unassisted across the frozen continent, came to what he describes in his new book The Impossible First, as “a hellish stretch...one of the hardest places on the continent to get across.” A polar wind he estimates at “fifty or even sixty miles an hour” lashed him as he entered a precarious area that was “off the map—unreachable and inaccessible.

A block of ice a quarter the size of Wales calves from the eastern side of the Antarctic Peninsula. The giant block is estimated to cover an area of roughly 6,000 sq km; that's about a quarter the size The Larsen C shelf is a mass of floating ice formed by glaciers that have flowed down off the eastern

A research ship sailed from Tasmania to within 24 miles (40km) of the Antarctic ice edge to conduct "bacterial profiling" from air filter samples. The Daily with Dermot Murnaghan: How do we tackle climate change? Footage captures moment 40 m ' tower block ' of ice splits from glacier .

The glacier rests on the bottom of the fjord, 170m below the surface.

Kate Retallick from the University of Bangor, who is mapping the seafloor and the underwater cliff of the glacier front, said: "It's amazing to have witnessed such a big calving event.

"The bit of the glacier you are seeing above the surface - the 40-odd metres - that has been released. But all the stuff below has also come up.

"These icebergs aren't just the size of houses, they are the size of blocks of houses and blocks of flats. It's not insignificant at all."

Antarctica has lost three trillion tonnes of ice over the last 25 years - half of it in the last five.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says sea levels are likely to rise one metre by the end of the century, possibly more, with melting Antarctic ice a major contributor.

Simon Wallace showed us navigational charts drawn as recently as 2009 which were now out of date because of the ice retreat.

"We have literally gone off the charts," he said.

"As far as they were concerned, this was the land. It's a very novel concept to a sailor because it looks like we are steaming up the beach."

He said scientists on board the ship repeated the same measurements year after year showing a clear trend in climate change.

"We know it's a problem and it's getting worse. Deal with it now in a well-ordered fashion before it is too late."

Gallery: Places around the world already affected by climate change (Photos)

A radio signal is coming from space every 16 days. What the hell is it? .
Scientists don’t know what to make of fast radio bursts. Some think they come from aliens.Until recently, that’s about all scientists could tell you about fast radio bursts, or FRBs. Our radio telescopes — which pick up noise rather than light — first detected them in 2007, and since then we’ve recorded a few dozen more, but not enough to be able to put together a compelling theory of what causes them.

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!