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US News The Wuhan Coronavirus, Climate Change, and Future Epidemics

10:20  07 february  2020
10:20  07 february  2020 Source:   time.com

1st US person-to-person coronavirus transmission reported in Illinois

  1st US person-to-person coronavirus transmission reported in Illinois The World Health Organization will decide whether or not to declare the new coronavirus a public health emergency of international concern. The organization deliberated for two days last week on the same issue but declined to declare a global emergency at the time. Since then, however, patients from Germany, Japan, Taiwan and Vietnam have been diagnosed with the new coronavirus without having visited China. The new coronavirus is in the same family of viruses as the common cold and SARS.

Science. 2019-nCoV. The Wuhan Coronavirus , Climate Change , and Future Epidemics . A previously unknown strain of coronavirus has dominated headlines in recent weeks, and alarmed public health officials with its rapid spread and virulent nature.

As China grapples with a mysterious coronavirus outbreak that has killed at least 490 people and sickened Aerial footage shows a quiet and desolate picture of Wuhan , China. The city, which has been at As the virus spread, officials in Wuhan and around the country withheld critical information

Ukraine International Airlines crew members wear protective masks while taking safety precautions amid concerns over coronavirus upon their arrival at the Boryspil International Airport outside Kiev, Ukraine February 4, 2020. REUTERS/Valentyn Ogirenko © Thomson Reuters Ukraine International Airlines crew members wear protective masks while taking safety precautions amid concerns over coronavirus upon their arrival at the Boryspil International Airport outside Kiev, Ukraine February 4, 2020. REUTERS/Valentyn Ogirenko

A previously unknown strain of coronavirus has dominated headlines in recent weeks, and alarmed public health officials with its rapid spread and virulent nature. But it’s really no surprise to the scientists who study infectious disease: it’s just one of several pathogens that have the potential to reach calamitous status.

Corona, the beer company, says it trusts customers not to link its drinks to the deadly Wuhan coronavirus as searches for 'corona beer virus' rocket

  Corona, the beer company, says it trusts customers not to link its drinks to the deadly Wuhan coronavirus as searches for 'corona beer virus' rocket Google searches for "corona beer virus," "beer virus," and "beer coronavirus" have skyrocketed globally since January 18. Online searches for "corona beer virus," "beer virus," and "beer coronavirus" have rocketed around the world since January 18, in an apparent confusion that the drink and the virus are linked.

Thousands of African students in Wuhan , the centre of the coronavirus epidemic , face dwindling food supplies, limited information and lockdowns restricting them to their campuses or hostels. Two weeks after restrictions on movement were imposed, residents are running short of basic necessities

Climate change does not just affect humans; animals see their habitats shrink and/or change , which in turn force them to migrate to new areas. Wuhan , ground zero for the virus, has a population estimated at just about 11 million, and it’s only the 6th largest city in China. It probably won’t even

I have no evidence that climate change triggered this particular virus to jump from animals to humans at this particular time, or that a warmer planet has helped it spread. That said, it’s pretty clear that, broadly speaking, climate change is likely to lead to an uptick in future epidemics caused by viruses and other pathogens.

Scientists have understood for decades that climate change would change the way diseases spread, but, as the planet warms, those hypotheses are being tested and scientists are learning in real time.

With their high body temperatures, bats can carry a lot of viruses without suffering from them. © Nicolas Reusens—Getty Images With their high body temperatures, bats can carry a lot of viruses without suffering from them.

There are many links between climate change and infectious diseases, but I’m going to focus on one particularly novel—and concerning—area of knowledge: how rising temperatures are making our natural immune systems less effective.

GPs will get face masks and gowns as virus fears grow

  GPs will get face masks and gowns as virus fears grow Irish GPs are to be provided with full head-to-toe protective gowns and masks next week after warning the failure of the HSE to provide safety gear left them at risk of the deadly coronavirus. It follows growing concern about the virus threat here, following the detection of the first two cases of the killer infection in the UK.The HSE confirmed that the packs will be sent to GP surgeries after angry doctors' protests and the revelation that two Chinese tourists staying in an English hotel are infected with the virus.

The 2019–20 Wuhan coronavirus outbreak, formally the outbreak of novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV), is an ongoing viral epidemic primarily affecting mainland China

Most in-depth reports about the coronavirus epidemic have been carried by news outlets based outside Hubei Province, where Wuhan is located. One Caixin report relied almost exclusively on experts to suggest that Wuhan officials had delayed releasing essential information about the

Our bodies are amazing disease-fighting machines. One adaptation goes a long way: our warm body temperature can by itself shut down all sorts of unwanted invasions. When a pathogen enters our body, we often get a fever, warming us up even more to fight off disease. Fevers stimulate the immune system and, ideally, the heat creates an environment where it’s difficult for pathogens to survive.

BEIJING, CHINA - FEBRUARY 06: A Chinese woman wears a protective mask as she shops in a market on February 6, 2020 in Beijing, China. The number of cases of a deadly new coronavirus rose to more than 28000 in mainland China Thursday, days after the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the outbreak a global public health emergency. China continued to lock down the city of Wuhan in an effort to contain the spread of the pneumonia-like disease which medicals experts have confirmed can be passed from human to human. In an unprecedented move, Chinese authorities have put travel restrictions on the city which is the epicenter  of the virus and municipalities in other parts of the country affecting tens of millions of people. The number of those who have died from the virus in China climbed to over 564 on Thursday, mostly in Hubei province, and cases have been reported in other countries including the United States, Canada, Australia, Japan, South Korea, India, the United Kingdom, Germany, France and several others. The World Health Organization has warned all governments to be on alert and screening has been stepped up at airports around the world. Some countries, including the United States, have put restrictions on Chinese travelers entering and advised their citizens against travel to China. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images) © 2020 Getty Images BEIJING, CHINA - FEBRUARY 06: A Chinese woman wears a protective mask as she shops in a market on February 6, 2020 in Beijing, China. The number of cases of a deadly new coronavirus rose to more than 28000 in mainland China Thursday, days after the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the outbreak a global public health emergency. China continued to lock down the city of Wuhan in an effort to contain the spread of the pneumonia-like disease which medicals experts have confirmed can be passed from human to human. In an unprecedented move, Chinese authorities have put travel restrictions on the city which is the epicenter of the virus and municipalities in other parts of the country affecting tens of millions of people. The number of those who have died from the virus in China climbed to over 564 on Thursday, mostly in Hubei province, and cases have been reported in other countries including the United States, Canada, Australia, Japan, South Korea, India, the United Kingdom, Germany, France and several others. The World Health Organization has warned all governments to be on alert and screening has been stepped up at airports around the world. Some countries, including the United States, have put restrictions on Chinese travelers entering and advised their citizens against travel to China. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

But, as pathogens are exposed to gradually warmer temperatures in the natural world, they become better equipped to survive the high temperature inside the human body. “Every time we have a very hot day, we have a selection event,” says Arturo Casadevall, a professor of microbiology and immunology at Johns Hopkins University’s Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Irish to track deadly virus for months

  Irish to track deadly virus for months Summer flights scheduled to link China and Dublin will be assessed by Irish health officials who expect to spend months monitoring the spread of the deadly coronavirus. At present, there are no direct flights between Irish airports and China, but a new service between Dublin and Shanghai, with a stop each way in Helsinki, starts in March. Meanwhile, flights to Beijing are set to resume in the summer.

Patients being transferred to a newly completed hospital in Wuhan this week.Credit EPA, via Shutterstock. China’s leader, Xi Jinping, said on Wednesday that China is in a “critical moment” of its fight against the coronavirus epidemic as the death toll and number of infections continued to soar.

Wuhan , the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak, is an important production hub for the global auto industry. the collaboration of scientists, health care professionals and workers around the world, and the marshalling of the necessary global resources to combat the spread of this and future epidemics .

The pathogens that survive—and reproduce—are better adapted to higher temperatures, including those in our bodies. And, with that, one of our body’s primary defense mechanisms diminishes in effectiveness.

TOPSHOT - People wearing facemasks as a preventative measure following a coronavirus outbreak which began in the Chinese city of Wuhan, line up to purchase face masks from a makeshift stall after queueing for hours following a registration process during which they were given a pre-sales ticket, in Hong Kong on February 5, 2020. - The new coronavirus which appeared late December has claimed nearly 500 lives, infected more than 24,000 people in mainland China and spread to more than 20 countries. (Photo by Anthony WALLACE / AFP) (Photo by ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images) TOPSHOT - People wearing facemasks as a preventative measure following a coronavirus outbreak which began in the Chinese city of Wuhan, line up to purchase face masks from a makeshift stall after queueing for hours following a registration process during which they were given a pre-sales ticket, in Hong Kong on February 5, 2020. - The new coronavirus which appeared late December has claimed nearly 500 lives, infected more than 24,000 people in mainland China and spread to more than 20 countries. (Photo by Anthony WALLACE / AFP) (Photo by ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images)

This is not a theoretical, far-off concern. Last year, Casadevall and colleagues documented in the journal mBio how Candida auris (a fungus that gets into the bloodstream, leading to a range of ailments) emerged simultaneously in patients in three different isolated places—southern Asia, Venezuela and South Africa—between 2012 and 2015.

How Our Modern World Creates Outbreaks Like Coronavirus

  How Our Modern World Creates Outbreaks Like Coronavirus How Our Modern World Creates Outbreaks Like CoronavirusCamus was imagining a fictional outbreak of plague in 1948 in Oran, a port city in northwest Algeria. But at a time when the world is reeling from a very real microbial emergency sparked by the emergence of a novel coronavirus in Wuhan, central China, his observations are as pertinent as ever.

In our globalized world, diseases are often transported by human carriers who hop on planes, but in this case the scientists concluded that similar changing climatic conditions in each of these places likely drove the simultaneous development. It’s hard to say how widespread this effect could be, Casadevall says, but there’s no reason to think that it would be limited to fungi like Candida auris.

The strain of coronavirus that’s spreading now is different than Candida for many reasons, but its likely animal vector—bats—provides an interesting example of how temperatures relate to the spread of infectious disease. Like humans, bats are mammals that maintain a warm body temperature that protect them from disease.

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But while our body temperature rests around 98.6°F and spikes a few degrees when we’re sick, bats’ body temperatures can regularly jump to as high as 105°F. That means they can carry a whole slew of pathogens without suffering from them. In the near future, as global temperatures inch up, bats will continue to be protected by their body heat, while the pathogens they carry are better able to harm us.

How Our Modern World Creates Outbreaks Like Coronavirus

  How Our Modern World Creates Outbreaks Like Coronavirus How Our Modern World Creates Outbreaks Like CoronavirusCamus was imagining a fictional outbreak of plague in 1948 in Oran, a port city in northwest Algeria. But at a time when the world is reeling from a very real microbial emergency sparked by the emergence of a novel coronavirus in Wuhan, central China, his observations are as pertinent as ever.

For decades, scientists have recognized that climate change would lead to a range of public health consequences. A 1992 report from the National Academy of Sciences, for example, cited a number of ways climate change could lead to the spread of infectious disease and described the lack of resources devoted to studying the impact of climate change on disease as “disturbing.”

BANGKOK, THAILAND - 2020/02/04: People queue at a pharmacy to buy face masks at Siam square, following the outbreak. Bangkok is facing a shortage of protective surgical masks. The coronavirus originating from Wuhan China has spread across Asia causing panic in multiple countries inducing Thailand. Thailand has detected 25 cases. The virus has so far killed at least 425 people with over 20627 confirmed cases worldwide. (Photo by Patipat Janthong/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images) © 2020 SOPA Images BANGKOK, THAILAND - 2020/02/04: People queue at a pharmacy to buy face masks at Siam square, following the outbreak. Bangkok is facing a shortage of protective surgical masks. The coronavirus originating from Wuhan China has spread across Asia causing panic in multiple countries inducing Thailand. Thailand has detected 25 cases. The virus has so far killed at least 425 people with over 20627 confirmed cases worldwide. (Photo by Patipat Janthong/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Four years later, a widely-cited paper in the Journal of the American Medical Association warned that climate change could increase the spread of everything from malnutrition to malaria, and called for concerted study between doctors, climate scientists and social scientists. That same year the World Health Organization published a 300-page tome on the topic, looking at a slew of ties between climate and health, but at the same time noting that the links are “complex and multifactorial.”

We know more today than we did then, but there’s still a lot we don’t know. When Arctic permafrost melts, what pathogens that have been buried for millennia will be released into the atmosphere—and can we combat them? What will the loss of entire communities, countries and ways of life do to the human psyche? How far will disease-carrying mosquitoes currently isolated to the tropics roam as their range shifts?

Scientists are scrambling to find answers to these questions and many other “known unknowns,” but many unknown unknowns undoubtedly remain—and, in some ways, that’s what I find most terrifying.

Gallery: Deadly coronavirus spreading across China reaches US (USA TODAY)

a group of people riding skis on top of a building: A passenger aboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship waves to the media upon arriving at Yokohama port on February 6, 2020. Ten more people on a cruise ship off Japan have tested positive for the new coronavirus, local media said, raising the number of infections detected on the boat to 20. Tourists vacationing on the ship have been quarantined on the ship.

‘Excellent news!’– Irishman in coronavirus quarantine for two weeks gets the all-clear .
An Irish teacher who was airlifted from Wuhan and quarantined in Britain for two weeks has revealed he is able to return home to Kildare today. Ben Kavanagh – who documented his time in quarantine in Liverpool on Instagram – tested negative for coronavirus yesterday and was given the all-clear. Mr Kavanagh, who has been […]Ben Kavanagh – who documented his time in quarantine in Liverpool on Instagram – tested negative for coronavirus yesterday and was given the all-clear.

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