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US News China Tries 3,000-Year-Old Traditional Remedy on Virus Patients

14:20  15 february  2020
14:20  15 february  2020 Source:   msn.com

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China Using Traditional Chinese Medicine on Coronavirus Patients . Bloomberg News. China is administering its centuries- old traditional medicine on patients affected by the coronavirus No drugs or preventives have yet been approved against the virus , which has already claimed the lives of 1

China is reviving the practice of traditional Chinese medicine as it tries to get a grip on the Her traditional approach is in line with the Chinese Government's recommendations for treating After the WHO added a section on traditional medicine to its reference document on medicine last year , two

a pile of fries: Herbs used in the preparation of traditional Chinese medicines are arranged for photograph inside a Eu Yan Sang store in Singapore, on Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Eu Yan Sang International, the largest seller of traditional Chinese medicine in Asia outside of China, plans to add its signature herbs to Western health supplements such as vitamins to broaden its customer base. © Photographer: Bloomberg/Bloomberg Herbs used in the preparation of traditional Chinese medicines are arranged for photograph inside a Eu Yan Sang store in Singapore, on Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Eu Yan Sang International, the largest seller of traditional Chinese medicine in Asia outside of China, plans to add its signature herbs to Western health supplements such as vitamins to broaden its customer base.

China is administering its centuries-old traditional medicine on patients affected by the coronavirus disease, a top health official said.

Treatment in Wuhan hospitals combine Traditional Chinese Medicine, popularly known as TCM, and western medicines, said Wang Hesheng, the new health commission head in Hubei, the province at the center of the virus outbreak. He said TCM was applied on more than half of confirmed cases in Hubei.

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Getting Old Fast. Population of Chinese aged 65 and older is growing faster than the U.S. Source: National Bureau of Statistics of China & U.S. Census They don’t want to solely place their trust on locally made drugs and 3 , 000 - year - old traditional remedies using herbs, and techniques like

A 44- year - old man in the Philippines has died of the coronavirus, health officials said on Sunday, making him the first known death outside China . The man, a resident of Wuhan, China , the epicenter of the virus , died on Saturday after developing what officials called “severe pneumonia.”

“Our efforts have shown some good result,” Wang said at a press conference on Saturday, without elaborating. Top TCM experts have been sent to Hubei for “research and treatment,” he said.

No drugs or preventives have yet been approved against the virus, which has already claimed the lives of 1,523 people in China and affected about 66,500 people.

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Just weeks into the epidemic of the novel coronavirus, reports of treatments and vaccines against those infected have caused pockets of excitement. The first reported use of an experimental Gilead Sciences Inc. drug to fight the coronavirus has encouraged doctors to support further testing of the medication.

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Some 2,200 TCM workers have been sent to Hubei, Wang said.

Wang is one of the officials at the forefront of an effort by Beijing to reset its approach to the epidemic, after anger grew across China at a lack of transparency throughout the crisis that has shut down large swathes of the economy. Earlier this week, China sacked the top leadership in the embattled province, including Wang’s predecessor.

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Wang, who is also deputy head of the National Health Commission, was appointed a member of Hubei’s standing committee, the province’s top decision-making body. Days after his appointment, Hubei announced a shock adjustment in its method of counting infections to include those diagnosed with CT scans, a move that added nearly 15,000 cases to Hubei’s total count and dashed hopes the epidemic was coming under control.

Hubei has been decimated by the crisis and its medical facilities are at breaking point. While thousands of doctors have been sent from around China to the province to help and two new hospitals were built in a matter of days, it is still struggling with a shortage of supplies and medical staff. There are widespread reports of deaths in Hubei that could have been prevented, but weren’t due to a lack of adequate medical care.


How SARS trauma made Hong Kong distrust Beijing .
Hong Kong has never fully healed from the wounds inflicted by the 2002-2003 outbreak of the SARS coronavirus.You may think Hong Kong people look irrational in these days of coronavirus: they queue for hours for masks, even if many doctors repeat that, in most situations, they are not all that necessary or even helpful. They stock up on hand wipes, bleach and disinfectant, leaving shelves empty. They buy up all the toilet paper and tissues they can find, just upon a rumor that circulates online and in telephone chat groups warning supplies from China might run short.

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