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US News Coronavirus: William and Kate tell NHS 'the whole country is proud of you'

06:50  03 april  2020
06:50  03 april  2020 Source:   uk.style.yahoo.com

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Prince William and Kate told colleagues of the first medic to die from coronavirus how proud they and the whole country are of the NHS as they continue to battle the spread of the deadly disease. William , 37, went on to say: “I know all of you see this as your job and that you get on with it, but this

" The whole country is proud of you so thank you for everything you 're doing and all the hours you are putting in." Prince William and Kate told colleagues of the first medic to die from coronavirus how proud they and the whole country are of the NHS as they continue to battle the spread of the

(Video by Press Association)

Prince William and Kate told colleagues of the first medic to die from coronavirus how proud they and the whole country are of the NHS as they continue to battle the spread of the deadly disease.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge called staff at Queen’s Hospital Burton on Wednesday, the hospital where Amged El-Hawrani worked as an ear, nose and throat specialist.

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge et al. looking at the camera

The 55-year-old contracted COVID-19 and died at Glenfield Hospital in Leicester. He was the first medic to die from the illness.

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William and Kate have made telephone calls to thank NHS staff. The NHS workers, including doctors and nurses, told the royal couple about the invaluable support they have " The whole country is proud of you so thank you for everything you ’re doing and all the hours you are putting in.”

" The whole country is proud of you , so thank you for everything you 're doing and all the hours you are putting in." Accident and emergency nurse Brogan Bishop said: "We've been really busy. It's stressful." She added: "I can't wait to go back and tell my colleagues how wonderful they think we are."

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More on this story:

All the latest coronavirus news, views and analysis

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How to self-isolate: Key steps to prevent the infection (Vox)

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In a call from their home in Norfolk, where they and their three children are staying, the duke said: “We’d just like to say from the two of us how proud we are of all of you, and how amazingly you are all doing under extreme circumstances.”

William, 37, went on to say: “I know all of you see this as your job and that you get on with it, but this is a different level and you are doing an incredible job.

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Prince William and Kate Middleton share a touching phone call with NHS doctors and nurses as they thank them for Couple heard the impact, both personally and professionally, of coronavirus . The Duke continued: ' The whole country is proud of you , not just us, we really mean that , so thank you

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“The whole country is proud of you so thank you for everything you’re doing and all the hours you are putting in.”

Staff taking part included Gavin Boyle, chief executive of University Hospitals of Derby and Burton NHS Foundation Trust, and six staff from Queen’s Hospital Burton, including Mr Thompson and nurses of various grades who working in departments ranging from intensive care to emergency.

a man smiling for the camera: Undated handout photo issued by University Hospitals Derby and Burton of Amged El-Hawrani, the consultant has become the first frontline NHS hospital worker to die after testing positive for coronavirus, NHS England said. © Provided by Yahoo! Style UK Undated handout photo issued by University Hospitals Derby and Burton of Amged El-Hawrani, the consultant has become the first frontline NHS hospital worker to die after testing positive for coronavirus, NHS England said.

Emily Johnson, a hospital spokeswoman who listened in on the 25 minute conversation, said it had boosted morale, adding: “It genuinely felt like they shared in our grief.”

Alice Bloxham, a sister in the hospital’s Covid-19 cohort ward, said of the call: “This has been a difficult time for all the patients we care for and for the staff working in a very different environment. It was a pleasure to talk to the duke and duchess and to be able to explain some of the challenges we face for our patients.”

a group of people sitting at a desk: Handout photo issued by QueenÕs Hospital Burton of Staff from the hospital in Staffordshire, where the first frontline NHS worker to die after contracting coronavirus worked, joining in a conversation via telephone speakerphone with the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on Wednesday. (left to right) Dr James Crampton, QueenÕs Hospital Medical Director, Gavin Boyle, Chief Executive of University Hospitals Derby and Burton NHS Foundation Trust, Richard Welch, ITU staff nurse, Mr Adrian Thompson, Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) Consultant, Brogan Bishop, newly qualified staff nurse in the Emergency Department, Alice Bloxham, Sister on Ward 4, Covid-19 cohort ward, Chelsey Stephens, Staff nurse in Paediatrics. © Provided by Yahoo! Style UK Handout photo issued by QueenÕs Hospital Burton of Staff from the hospital in Staffordshire, where the first frontline NHS worker to die after contracting coronavirus worked, joining in a conversation via telephone speakerphone with the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on Wednesday. (left to right) Dr James Crampton, QueenÕs Hospital Medical Director, Gavin Boyle, Chief Executive of University Hospitals Derby and Burton NHS Foundation Trust, Richard Welch, ITU staff nurse, Mr Adrian Thompson, Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) Consultant, Brogan Bishop, newly qualified staff nurse in the Emergency Department, Alice Bloxham, Sister on Ward 4, Covid-19 cohort ward, Chelsey Stephens, Staff nurse in Paediatrics.

Accident and emergency nurse Brogan Bishop, who only qualified two months ago, was jumping up and down with excitement after speaking to the royal couple.

“We’ve been really busy. It’s stressful,” she said, before adding: “I can’t wait to go back and tell my colleagues how wonderful they think we are.”

Britain's Prince William and his wife Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, visit the Teagasc research farm in County Meath, Ireland March 4, 2020. REUTERS/Phil Noble © Thomson Reuters Britain's Prince William and his wife Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, visit the Teagasc research farm in County Meath, Ireland March 4, 2020. REUTERS/Phil Noble

William and Kate also rang staff at University Hospital Monklands in North Lanarkshire and Kate urged them to look after themselves while they were being pushed to the limit.

The duchess, 38, said: “You’re stretched in all sorts of ways looking after the patients in your care under such extreme circumstances.

NHS workers applaud on the streets outside Chelsea and Westminster Hospital during the Clap for our Carers campaign in support of the NHS as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, London, Britain, April 2, 2020. REUTERS/Kevin Coombs © Thomson Reuters NHS workers applaud on the streets outside Chelsea and Westminster Hospital during the Clap for our Carers campaign in support of the NHS as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, London, Britain, April 2, 2020. REUTERS/Kevin Coombs

“But you also need to be able to make sure you support yourselves, and each other. It must be so hard but I’m glad to hear that you’re currently getting all the support you need.”

Dr Marion Devers, the deputy chief of medical services at Monklands in Airdrie said: “It was a great opportunity to reflect. It really refuelled us.”

In this photo made available by Buckingham Palace, Britain's Queen Elizabeth II speaks to Prime Minister Boris Johnson from Windsor Castle, Windsor, England, Wednesday March 25, 2020, for her weekly audience. Prince Charles, the heir to the British throne, has tested positive for the new coronavirus, royal officials confirmed Wednesday. Buckingham Palace said Queen Elizabeth II, 93, remains at her Windsor Castle home west of London with her 98-year-old husband, Prince Philip. (Buckingham Palace via AP) © ASSOCIATED PRESS In this photo made available by Buckingham Palace, Britain's Queen Elizabeth II speaks to Prime Minister Boris Johnson from Windsor Castle, Windsor, England, Wednesday March 25, 2020, for her weekly audience. Prince Charles, the heir to the British throne, has tested positive for the new coronavirus, royal officials confirmed Wednesday. Buckingham Palace said Queen Elizabeth II, 93, remains at her Windsor Castle home west of London with her 98-year-old husband, Prince Philip. (Buckingham Palace via AP)

Those on the call, including nurses, doctors, and a hospital cleaner, spoke of the challenges they face dealing with the virus and the kindness of people who have brought food in for them.

The royals have been following government guidelines on social distancing and staying at home and so have been conducting most of their meetings by phone or video call.

The Queen’s weekly audience with the Prime Minister now happens by phone.

Last week, William and Kate shared a video of their three children taking part in Clap for Carers, in their garden in Anmer Hall.

Before the lockdown, the Cambridges also visited an NHS 111 call centre in Croydon, where they thanked staff for their work.

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Stay at home to stop coronavirus spreading - here is what you can and can't do. If you think you have the virus, don't go to the GP or hospital, stay indoors and get advice online. Only call NHS 111 if you cannot cope with your symptoms at home; your condition gets worse; or your symptoms do not get better after seven days. In parts of Wales where 111 isn't available, call NHS Direct on 0845 46 47. In Scotland, anyone with symptoms is advised to self-isolate for seven days. In Northern Ireland, call your GP.  

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usr: 0
This is interesting!