buying: Buying An "As-Is" Used Car Is About to Be Less Confusing - - PressFrom - US
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buying Buying An "As-Is" Used Car Is About to Be Less Confusing

21:10  15 december  2016
21:10  15 december  2016 Source:   roadandtrack.com

Fall Is the Best Time to Buy Tires for Winter

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Most used cars in America are sold As - Is , at least in the states which allow As - Is sales. And this designation causes much confusion for car buyers who cannot understand why they have almost no legal rights when it comes to used cars that blow up shortly after purchase. The topic has been

Most used cars in America are sold As - Is , at least in the states which allow As - Is sales. And this designation causes much confusion for car buyers And this designation causes much confusion for car buyers who cannot understand why they have almost no legal rights when it comes to used cars

Buying An © Ulrich Baumgartenundefined Buying An "As-Is" Used Car Is About to Be Less Confusing Most used cars in America are sold As-Is, at least in the states which allow As-Is sales. And this designation causes much confusion for car buyers who cannot understand why they have almost no legal rights when it comes to used cars that blow up shortly after purchase. The topic has been subject of rantings of lawyers who write columns on the internet and also of the Federal Trade Commission. The FTC has recently updated its efforts to educate used car buyers in the U.S. And the slight change the FTC has made to the law might even incrementally help used car buyers.

This 2000 Corvette Claims More Than 700,000 Miles on the Original Engine

  This 2000 Corvette Claims More Than 700,000 Miles on the Original Engine Why buy a commuter car when you can commute in your sports cars?​​This 2000 Corvette fits the bill, with a claimed 710,000 miles on the odometer. According to a video posted to YouTube last year when the Corvette had 650,000 miles, the car's owner travels extensively between Florida and Georgia for work, hence the incredibly high mileage.

Since an “ as is " purchase is a risk for the car buyer, there are typically several conditions determining when a dealer can sell a car with no warranty. Private sales are much less regulated than sales at a dealer. Many states don't require a private seller to ensure the car will pass state inspection before

( Cars that are less than three years old use a combination of historical reliability and new car quality data.) Potential buyers can also explore owners’ While leasing is simple in concept, it comes with a language that ’s different than car buying and can be confusing to consumers who have never been

As anyone who has ever car shopped in the U.S. knows, "Buyer's Guides" are affixed to the windows of cars sitting on car lots. The Buyer's Guide explicitly points out whether the car comes "AS-IS NO WARRANTY" or with a "WARRANTY." As noted, a vast majority of the cars are sold with the first box checked. And this document was created by mandate of the Federal Trade Commission. The purpose of the Buyer's Guide was to put buyers on notice of what sort of warranty–if any–the car was being sold with. The problem was that the Buyer's Guide used to then say–after the As-Is designation–"The dealer is not responsible for any repairs, regardless of any oral statements about the vehicle." This statement was odd. Oral statements made by who? The seller? And which repairs? Ones identified as necessary before the sale? Or after?

How to Go Broke by Buying Race Cars on the Internet

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Used Online Buying If you want to buy a used vehicle online, there are many used car buying sites, including eBay Motors, where you can search for Most people take only a few minutes to test drive a car ; this is a big mistake that often comes back to haunt them. Before driving, spend as much time as

Extended Warranty Buying a used vehicle can be very confusing for consumers, particularly for first-time buyers. I tried to gather the details from ica website but find Some people get a little concerned that this might be some kind of New Age routine that is obscure and confusing due to it's complexity.

The FTC passed new rules in an attempt to clarify some of this confusion. And, as of January 27, 2017, the new rule mandates that the Buyer's Guide must say: "The dealer does not provide a warranty for any repairs after sale." Admittedly, this does a little better job explaining to an As-Is buyer that the car they are buying can blow up as it is being driven off the lot and the buyer will not be able to complain about it. At least not legally. It is just unclear if this will actually make that big of a difference when the typical buyer sees a few dozen documents at the time of the sale and spends only a few minutes reading and signing them.

The FTC has also said that car sellers can use the remaining Buyer's Guides they have in stock until they run out before ordering the new ones. So don't be surprised if this new Buyer's Guide doesn't work its way into the stream of commerce before sometime next year. (Anyone who wants to doublecheck my math can go look up the FTC's Used Car Rule; it is 16 CFR 455.)

Tips For Buying (or Selling) A Used Bike

  Tips For Buying (or Selling) A Used Bike ©Motorcyclist Is high mileage a deal-breaker for you? Before you say yes, take into consideration the bike's condition and model-year. Do the math! When shopping for a used bike, most buyers look at condition, price, and mileage. Conventional wisdom says the average rider logs 3,000 to 5,000 miles a year. If that’s the case, why do so many bikes seem to have above-average mileage? That’s not just an idle observation; I’m seeing more high-mileage bikes for trade-in than ever. ©Motorcyclist A Ninja 250 with only 214 miles on the clock? Sold! The why. Simple, it’s the recession. Those who felt the effects of the recession decided that the bike they were riding would suffice and purchasing a new or newer bike wasn’t a necessity. This decision added a few years to the length of ownership, which added more miles. And while the annual mileage might not have been much more, these owners are now starting to trade up older, higher-mileage bikes. Where you could count on a bike three to four years old with, say, 15,000 miles, now we’re seeing five- to seven-year-old bikes with nearly double that. There is also some truth to the theory that these owners are keeping bikes longer and riding them more rather than buying new, adding the trinkets, and admiring their work with an elbow on the workbench. That also raised the average miles per year.

Buying a Used Car - Tips and Scams to Avoid. Last Modified: May 01, 2019 by Jeff Ostroff | Originally Published August 12, 2000. If you bought your car from a private seller it will always be " As Is ". I don't think you really have any choice in this case and you must buy an extended warranty or you are

• Inform you when a vehicle is sold “ as is .” • Allow you or a mechanic you chose to inspect a used car before you buy it. • Provide you in the contract of sale, all promises by the dealer to • If the car costs more than ,000 and is less than 7 years old (The dealer must cover all repairs necessary to keep

It should be noted that As-Is sales are not allowed in every state and there are even a few states with used car "lemon laws." Some states also have inspection laws which state that a vehicle must at least pass an inspection after the sale or the buyer might have some sort of recourse against the seller. But, if nothing else, pay attention to the language on the Buyer's Guide – as wise people have advised you to do in the past. If you see the language and choose to disregard it now, you are ignoring even more dire language than what was there previously.

Steve Lehto is a writer and attorney from Michigan. He specializes in Lemon Law and frequently writes about cars and the law. His most recent books include Preston Tucker and His Battle to Build the Car of Tomorrow, and Dodge Daytona and Plymouth Superbird: Design, Development, Production and Competition. He also has a podcast where he talks about these things.

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