buying: How to Avoid Car-Buying Fees - PressFrom - US
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buyingHow to Avoid Car-Buying Fees

20:50  07 june  2019
20:50  07 june  2019 Source:   consumerreports.org

How Do I Get the Best Deal on a Car That's Not Even Out Yet?

How Do I Get the Best Deal on a Car That's Not Even Out Yet? Is it possible to negotiate a price on a car before it arrives or is it smarter to wait six months to gain some leverage? This is a question that readers and clients ask me frequently. I’ll tell you what I tell them: It really depends on the car and the projected demand. On a car like the new GLE 450, Mercedes isn’t likely to throw any factory rebates on the hood for a while, if they do it at all. So any discount is going to come out of the dealer’s pocket.

Car buying is stressful enough without worrying about sneaky fees and unnecessary add-ons. See Consumer Reports' tips for avoiding car - buying fees . But you can often avoid other fees or negotiate them down. And check the laws in your state: Some cap the fees that dealers can charge.

Purchasing a new car is stressful enough, so it helps to go into a showroom knowing which of the charges that show up on your bill are unavoidable, which can be negotiated, and which you can

How to Avoid Car-Buying Fees © Provided by Consumers Union of United States, Inc.

Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with advertisers on this site.

Purchasing a new car is stressful enough, so it helps to go into a showroom knowing which of the charges that show up on your bill are unavoidable, which can be negotiated, and which you can skip altogether.

And remember: You have the power to walk out and shop somewhere else. That’s what CR member Ron Martinson of Falls Church, Va., says he did: “I told [the salesperson] that he got one chance to give me his final/best offer, and that there would be no ‘add-ons’ except for government charges/taxes. He lost the deal.”

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Here are common car dealership fees and services to dodge When you're ready to buy a new set of wheels, you'll want to keep these fees and service offers in mind to avoid paying pesky How willing they are to lower it depends on how good a deal you got on the car . If you cut their profit to the bone

Those government charges can include sales tax and the cost of establishing the title and registration in your name. Another unavoidable fee is the destination charge, or what the automaker charges for delivering the vehicle from the factory to the dealership; it’s included in the official window sticker.

But you can often avoid other fees or negotiate them down. And check the laws in your state: Some cap the fees that dealers can charge.

Documentation or Conveyance Charges

Though it’s reasonable to pay the actual cost of your title and registration, dealers often charge extra—sometimes hundreds more—for processing these and other documents.

The fix: You might not be able to avoid this fee entirely, but you can try for a discount or ask for something in return, such as dealer-installed accessories like winter floor mats.

What Happens to Your Car When You Trade It In

What Happens to Your Car When You Trade It In When you trade in your old car for a brand new model, one of three things can happen.

How can I avoid admin fees ? As above, admin fees are wrapped up with other events that happened during your rental, such as handling damage, paying How can I avoid tax charges? Any charges added on by the state will have to be paid. It’s worth checking your car ’s terms and conditions before

Buying & Leasing a Car . How to Avoid Unnecessary Rental Car Fees . If you're charged a fee that wasn't disclosed when you signed for the car or made an online reservation, fight it. Jeremy Acevedo, a research analyst at Edmunds.com and former Enterprise employee, says the squeaky wheel often

Advertising Fee

Dealers sometimes add an extra few hundred dollars to recoup the cost of national and regional advertising campaigns.

The fix: If the dealer says he will sell a car at the invoice price but you have to pay an advertising fee, just say no. The cost of advertising the car is baked into the sticker price.

Delivery and Preparation Fees

Dealers sometimes paste a second sticker on a car’s window next to the official one, listing charges with names like “pre-delivery inspection,” “dealer prep,” “vehicle prep,” or “vehicle procurement.”

The fix: Contest them all. They’re part of the mandatory destination charge—which, by the way, should also include a full tank of gas.

Market Adjustment Fee

This is a tough one to avoid if you are shopping for a hot-seller, because dealers may have little incentive to negotiate.

The fix: Still, it’s not a mandatory charge—so it’s worth asking for a discount, especially because the added cost is not just an up-front expense. Paying extra initially also typically means losing more as the car depreciates.

What Happens to Your Car When You Trade It In

What Happens to Your Car When You Trade It In When you trade in your old car for a brand new model, one of three things can happen.

If you're buying a car , CBC Nova Scotia's Consumer Watchdog Yvonne Colbert gives a run down of several fees that you should avoid .

How to check the final paperwork for financial accuracy and for all dealership fees , some of which you can and should avoid paying. Whether you're leasing or buying a new car , you should carefully check all the numbers on the agreement. Use the calculator on your mobile phone or bring one with

Loan Payment Fees

Many automakers offer loans directly to car buyers—and a third of the people in our survey who got one of those loans said they were surprised by a fee connected to it. For example, Diane Weiser of Port Lavaca, Texas, says she was shocked to find that every time she called to make a payment, she was charged a $10 customer service fee. “And that was for on-time payments, too!” she says.

The fix: Make sure you understand the payment terms before you go through an automaker’s financing arm. Check with your own bank, too, which may offer a better deal and lower or no fees.

Unnecessary Add-Ons

Though not technically fees, dealers often try to upsell unnecessary services or features, including:

  • VIN etching. A local mechanic will charge you less for this anti-theft measure, which involves etching the vehicle identification number on the car’s glass. Or buy a do-it-yourself kit for as little as $20.
  • Extended warranty. A warranty that covers repairs after the manufacturer’s warranty expires can provide peace of mind. But it can add thousands to the cost of the car. CR recommends buying a reliable vehicle and setting aside an emergency fund instead.
  • Disability and life insurance. Some dealers offer these and similar policies with your auto loan to help you pay for the vehicle if you are injured or die early. But you can get cheaper coverage through your primary home, car, or life insurer.
  • Rustproofing, paint sealing, or fabric protection. Today’s cars are built to withstand corrosive weather and road conditions, so they don’t need additional treatments, which can add hundreds to the cost of your car. Paint sealants are basically just wax that will wear off after a few months. And the interior protection is just expensive spray-on fabric protectant.

Editor’s Note: This article also appeared in the July 2019 issue of Consumer Reports magazine.

Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with advertisers on this site.

Consumer Reports is an independent, nonprofit organization that works side by side with consumers to create a fairer, safer, and healthier world. CR does not endorse products or services, and does not accept advertising. Copyright © 2019, Consumer Reports, Inc.

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