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buying Tell Us about Your Cars and How the Pandemic Changed Your Driving Life

10:45  04 june  2021
10:45  04 june  2021 Source:   caranddriver.com

2017 Acura MDX Hybrid: What You Need to Know

  2017 Acura MDX Hybrid: What You Need to Know There’s a lot to like about the 2017 Acura MDX Hybrid, including its lithe handling and swift acceleration. However, its poor predicted reliability rating and frustrating infotainment controls pull it down near the bottom of our hybrid and electric SUV rankings. The 2017 Acura MDX Hybrid is ranked: #10 in 2017 Hybrid SUVs #52 in Used Hybrid SUVs under $30K Is the 2017 Acura MDX Hybrid a Good Used SUV? Despite its ranking, the 2017 Acura MDX Sport Hybrid is a decent vehicle. With good acceleration and sporty handling, this Acura proves that a hybrid SUV can be fun to drive. It comes with plenty of standard features too.

The world has changed in many different and unexpected ways since the coronavirus pandemic hit in 2020. And there have been many prognostications about how all this change will affect cars and driving.

a woman sitting on the seat of a car: We've heard plenty about how COVID has changed driving habits for good. We know EVs are now here for real. Our survey asks what has actually changed for you. © Roy Ritchie - Car and Driver We've heard plenty about how COVID has changed driving habits for good. We know EVs are now here for real. Our survey asks what has actually changed for you.

People will definitely want to escape cities, some news stories proclaimed, and they will have to buy cars. People will be working from home, said others, so they won’t need to drive as much, so they’ll buy fewer cars. At first it seemed like the lack of commuting time for a lot of people put a major dent in the podcasting industry. But then came reports that podcast listeners were back.

Who's loving the semiconductor chip shortage? Car dealerships

  Who's loving the semiconductor chip shortage? Car dealerships With inventory so tight, car buyers are ready to pony up and pay sticker price.Reuters reported on the state of the industry on Monday and profiled a couple of dealerships caught in the middle of eager car buyers and too little inventory. It's a simple story of supply and demand: Automakers can't build enough new vehicles, due to chip shortages, and car buyers want them. In turn, many buyers have no problem paying sticker price and foregoing the wheeling and dealing that can knock a couple grand off the MSRP. Dealers get to keep even more cash in their pockets and buyers get their new car. Record profits ensue.

Rather than listen to analysts and industry watchers, we’re going right to the source to find out how the world has changed. We’re conducting a survey and we’d love to hear directly from you—the most passionate car folks we know. We want to know what you are seeing and what you're thinking. About your daily driver. About the next vehicle you may buy or lease. About the options automakers are offering, and how you use them.


Video: Finding the Perfect Two-Car Solution: Window Shop with Car and Driver (Car and Driver)

It’s a super simple survey that should take about 10 minutes to finish. No one question is required, but we'd love to know as much about you and your thoughts as you're willing to share.

We’ll close the survey in two weeks, and we’ll publish the most interesting findings in our September issue. If you’re interested in lending us your experience and perspective, click the link below. And please feel free to share it with friends.

Take the Survey

2021 BMW 430i Coupe First Drive: The Nose Isn’t the Problem .
Let’s get the barf emojis, raised eyebrows, and pointing and snickering aimed at the redesigned-for-2021 BMW 4 Series’ new flared nostrils out of the way now. The huge dual grille openings resemble many things—buck teeth, the nasal passages on a bare skull, etc.—but few will recognize that they mark a return to the original tall, skinny kidney grilles applied to early BMW models a century ago. Historical footnotes aside, the weird face tragically distracts from the rest of the 4 Series design, which is svelte and attractive, like a three-quarter-scale 8 Series coupe.

usr: 1
This is interesting!