•   
  •   
  •   

Classics The 1971–76 Olds Ninety-Eight was the thinking man’s Cadillac

17:45  12 december  2020
17:45  12 december  2020 Source:   hagerty.com

Freaky Cadillac Brougham Hearse Rides High On Chevy Truck Chassis

  Freaky Cadillac Brougham Hearse Rides High On Chevy Truck Chassis It even comes with a coffin in the back. Halloween is right around the corner, and this 1990 Cadilac Brougham hearse is for sale. It rides closer to heaven thanks to sitting on a lifted Chevrolet K10 truck chassis. Make your costume a hazmat suit to handle social distancing concerns and use this beast to hand out candy on October 31. A Cadillac Brougham hearse is eye-catching in any specification, but this one grabs even more attention with its massive ride height. The beast sits on 17-inch wheels with rugged mud-terrain tires. A skull logo is on the swingout back door.

The Cadillac Fleetwood is a model of luxury car that was manufactured by the Cadillac division of General Motors between 1976 and 1996.

1976 Oldsmobile Ninety - Eight Regency 4-door hardtop ( Ninety - Eight sedans did not exist from 1971 -1976). Igor Bolshakov on Instagram: “A new body style was the Luxury Coupe. For the first time ever all Oldsmobile 98 s were now hardtops, and for the first time since 1964 not…”

a car parked in a parking lot: Thomas Klockau © Provided by Hagerty Thomas Klockau a car parked in a parking lot: Thomas Klockau © Provided by Hagerty Thomas Klockau

Of all the GM marques that have been consigned to the history books, it’s Oldsmobile I miss the most. During my early childhood in the ’80s, they were everywhere. Cutlass Cieras and Cutlass Supremes most of all, but there were plenty of others out and about. I always loved the top-of-the-line Ninety-Eights.

a car parked in a parking lot: Thomas Klockau © Provided by Hagerty Thomas Klockau

The Ninety-Eight was the flossiest, fanciest Oldsmobile of them all, with the possible exception of the Toronado, and it lasted all the way through the 1996 model year. In 1995, the ultra-modern, V-8-powered Aurora became the new flagship, for all intents and purposes, and the long-lived Ninety-Eight was allowed to fade away.

Enter To Win The Very First 1969 Hurst/Olds 442

  Enter To Win The Very First 1969 Hurst/Olds 442 You could park this important piece of muscle car history with pride in your garage. Of all the legendary American muscle cars, the 1969 Hurst/Olds 442 is a true standout. Born out of an unbelievable collaboration between Hurst Performance and Oldsmobile, these Cutlass 442 models were truly special. Only 906 were made and as you might already know that makes each one a valuable collector’s item. Adding to their desirability is the fact they’re all a little different, thanks to the cars featuring not only the Hurst conversion package but also optionally any parts from the Cutlass 442 owners ordered.

By the mid 1950 s the Ninety Eight was pretty much a junior Cadillac with more conservative styling. I always thought this element, that was retained in variation on Ninety Eights til the end But I don’t think the 1962 Chevy, Olds and Buick are ugly. But some of the details are strange, like

1971 Oldsmobile Ninety Eight Luxury Sedan and Oldsmobile Royale Hardtop. 1970 Oldsmobile Ninety - Eight Convertible for sale by Affordable Classics Motorcars. 1966 Cadillac Eldorado Convertible For Sale Vehicles from Oshawa Ontario Toronto @ Adpost.com Classifieds > Canada

a blue car parked in a parking lot: Thomas Klockau © Provided by Hagerty Thomas Klockau

Still, what a great run it had! The Ninety-Eight lasted from the early ’40s all the way to ’96. Not bad—but the biggest, Broughamiest ones were the Nimitz-class, 1971–76 versions.

a car parked in a parking lot: Thomas Klockau © Provided by Hagerty Thomas Klockau

There were still a few of these running around my Midwestern city from the ’80s through the mid-’90s, after which they started rapidly disappearing. The ever-present summertime demolition derbies at the county fairgrounds claimed many of them. Rust claimed even more. Even so, I always had a soft spot for them, and their Cadillac de Ville/Buick Electra brethren.

a motorcycle parked on the side of a car: Thomas Klockau © Provided by Hagerty Thomas Klockau

For many, the Ninety-Eight was the best GM luxury car deal around. It rode on the same C-body chassis as the more expensive Buicks and Cadillacs, but had the same dimensions, space, comfort, and 90 percent of the available extras. About the only thing that wasn’t regularly available on these premium Oldses was a leather interior, though that did become an option in later years.

These new and used cars take the longest time to sell

  These new and used cars take the longest time to sell And often times, the longer they wait around, the better chance there is to score a deal.iSeeCars is back with new research after diving into over 4.4 million new and used cars sales from March through June to see which cars are hanging out at dealerships or sitting with "for sale" signs the longest. You may expect the list is full of sedans and hatchbacks, knowing America can't get enough SUVs and pickup trucks . However, there are a couple of surprises when it comes to the slowest selling new cars.

Here' s our '69 Olds '98' Convertible. It hasn't ran in 6 months (it was in winter storage). Here' s a video showing off how good of a runner this thing is .

The Ninety - Eight was downsized by 800 pounds in 1977, along with its Cadillac de Ville and Buick Electra brethren, and the depiction of the unstoppable The Regency was the plushest Ninety - Eight you could get in 1979, and the coupe was far more stylish than the sedan. If you like “wood” in your

a view of a car: Thomas Klockau © Provided by Hagerty Thomas Klockau

As the ’71 brochure extolled, “1971 Ninety-Eight Sedans, for example, are the most spacious ever offered by Oldsmobile. Every significant interior dimension has been generously increased … and when it comes to smoothness, nothing can match the great new ride system developed for Ninety-Eight by Olds engineers.”

Thomas Klockau © Provided by Hagerty Thomas Klockau

The 1971 Ninety-Eight debuted with all the other new Oldses on September 10, 1970. Ninety-Eights came in four models. Holiday hardtop coupe and Holiday hardtop sedan ($4828 and $4890, respectively), the LS four-door hardtop ($5197), and the LS two-door hardtop ($5103). The convertible was gone, having been discontinued after the 1970 model year.

a car parked in a parking lot: Thomas Klockau © Provided by Hagerty Thomas Klockau

’71 Ninety-Eights rode a 127-inch wheelbase and had a generous overall length, at 226.1-inch. Power was ample, with the 455-cu-in V-8, backed by Turbo Hydramatic automatic transmission. Power was 320 hp at 4400 rpm, breathing through a Rochester 4MC four-barrel carburetor. LS coupes like this lovely green one, spotted by your author at the 2015 Oldsmobile Nationals in Brookfield, Wisconsin, was one of 14,876 built that year.

Rare 1971 De Tomaso Pantera Awaits New Owner

  Rare 1971 De Tomaso Pantera Awaits New Owner It's an early pre-L model that's gloriously original.The De Tomaso Pantera doesn't get the love it deserves. That's a generally accepted fact not just by De Tomaso fans but by motoring enthusiasts in general. It's not unloved by any means, but when your supercar competition is the Lamborghini Countach, Ferrari 512 BB, and eventually the Testarossa, it's hard to stand out in a crowd.

July 2010 : 1976 Oldsmobile Ninety Eight Regency cold start. The 76 98 is the largest Oldsmobile built, and the final year of the 455 cid engine. She is the

However, it was Ransom E. Olds and his Olds Motor Vehicle Company (later known as Oldsmobile) who Any woman can drive an electric automobile, any man can drive a steam, but neither man nor woman can The new pyroxylin-based paints, eight -cylinder engine, four-wheel brakes, and balloon

a car parked on the side of a building: GM © Provided by Hagerty GM

The big news in 1972 was a new, top of the line Ninety-Eight, the Regency. Built to commemorate the 75th anniversary of Oldsmobile, it was available only as a four-door hardtop. All were painted in special Tiffany Gold, with your choice of gold or black floating-pillow seating. Storage pockets were added to the front seat backs, and a Tiffany logo clock graced the instrument panel.

a car parked in a parking lot: Thomas Klockau © Provided by Hagerty Thomas Klockau

The Regency returned for 1973, along with a more pronounced 5-mph front bumper. A selection of interior and exterior colors were now available, but the pillowed seats, storage pockets, and other frills remained.

a car parked in a parking lot: Thomas Klockau © Provided by Hagerty Thomas Klockau

With the 1973 model year, there were now five models: coupe, sedan, Luxury coupe, Luxury sedan, and the Regency sedan. There would be no corresponding Regency coupe until ’74.

a close up of a car: Thomas Klockau © Provided by Hagerty Thomas Klockau

The 1973 Regency sedan, like this gorgeous cranberry metallic example, spied at the ’15 Olds Nationals, same as the green ’71 coupe, had a base price of $5417. It weighed in at 4659 pounds, and 34,009 examples were sold.

Why Honda Civic, Subaru BRZ Are Keeping Manual Transmissions Alive

  Why Honda Civic, Subaru BRZ Are Keeping Manual Transmissions Alive These new cars, plus the Mazda Miata and Ford Mustang, are some of the last hopes out there for stick-shift fans. Honda and Subaru both unveiled vehicles this week that offer manual transmissions: the 2022 Civic prototype and the 2022 BRZ.While sales numbers and availability of manual transmissions are shrinking, there remains an enthusiast market that is still hungry for three pedals. Young drivers are also still buying vehicles with manual transmissions.This week both the 11th-generation Honda Civic and 2022 Subaru BRZ were unveiled to the public.

a brown leather couch sitting on top of a car: Thomas Klockau © Provided by Hagerty Thomas Klockau

For those who wanted to be a little more under the radar, the LS had a somewhat less Broughamtastic interior, though still quite nice. 1973 brochures told prospects to “Drive it and draw your own conclusions.” The LS sedan was about $250 less than the Regency and sold better, too, to the tune of 55,695.

a car parked in a parking lot: Jason Bagge © Provided by Hagerty Jason Bagge

Even if you chose an LS over a Regency, you were still getting a luxury car. You still got a 455 V-8, which by 1973 was producing 275 hp at 3600 rpm. Bore and stroke were 4.12 and 4.250, respectively. By the way, this root-beer-brown ’73 LS was owned by my friend in Spokane, Washington—Jason Bagge. It was the best $800 he ever spent. It has since been sold and now lives in New York State.

a car parked in a parking lot: Jason Bagge © Provided by Hagerty Jason Bagge

Wheelbase remained at 127 inches, but the 1973 cars were a little bit longer thanks to that front bumper, at 230.2 inches. Standard equipment included a Turbo-Hydramatic automatic transmission (naturally), Deluxe steering wheel, power seats, power steering, and power brakes (front disc, rear drum).

a car parked in a parking lot in front of a building: Jason Bagge © Provided by Hagerty Jason Bagge

Options were plentiful, though. Some of the more popular ones included air conditioning ($397), cruise control ($62), power door locks ($69), power windows ($75), and an AM/FM stereo radio, at $233.

What Was the Last 3-On-the-Floor Manual Car Americans Could Buy?

  What Was the Last 3-On-the-Floor Manual Car Americans Could Buy? The 3-on-the-tree manual disappeared from new cars here after 1979. How about the 3-on-the-floor?Since General Motors was the last holdout to sell new US-market cars with three-on-the-tree manual transmissions, it comes as no surprise that GM also sold the last three-on-the-floor cars here (we're talking about cars, not trucks, remember; GM, Ford and Chrysler each sold trucks so equipped deeper into the 1980s). Those cars were built on the A (then in the process of being renamed the G) and F platforms for the 1981 model year, the best-known of which were the Chevrolet Malibu and Chevrolet Camaro.

a close up of a motorcycle: Jason Bagge © Provided by Hagerty Jason Bagge

The Olds was really a great deal when you considered a Cadillac Calais went for $6038, a Sedan de Ville for $6500. Surprisingly though, the Electra 225 hardtop was cheaper than the Olds Ninety-Eight LS at $4928 for the four-door hardtop.

a car parked in a parking lot: Jason Bagge © Provided by Hagerty Jason Bagge

Electra 225 Customs went for $5105, but adding the Limited interior trim package was an extra $174. I only found that out while researching this article. What would Alfred P. Sloan have said?! Buick was, after all, more premium than Oldsmobile most of the time. Oh well!

a car parked in a parking lot: Thomas Klockau © Provided by Hagerty Thomas Klockau

As previously mentioned, a Regency coupe joined the sedan in 1974 and gained a matching 5-mph rear bumper, along with the expected new grille and taillights. 1975 brought another mild refresh, the most notable feature being quad rectangular headlights, which also graced 1975 Toronados.

a car parked in a parking lot: Thomas Klockau © Provided by Hagerty Thomas Klockau

The Regency sedan was the most popular Ninety Eight of model year 1975, with 35,264 built and a base price of $6366. This guacamole-hued time capsule was spotted at one of the monthly cruise nights in Coralville, Iowa, which I frequently attend with my Uncle Dave and Aunt Lori. I was smitten with this car and loved the oh so mid-’70s color combination.

a police car parked in a parking lot: Thomas Klockau © Provided by Hagerty Thomas Klockau

It was a good thing I took many pictures, because I never saw that ’75 again. That’s the way it works sometimes. I’ve attended this summertime cruise night since about 2003. Some cars, I see nearly every time. Others, I see once and never again. It pays to take too many pictures, sometimes.

The 1973 Caprice was luxury for a low price

  The 1973 Caprice was luxury for a low price For most of the postwar years and though the mid- to late ’70s, Chevrolet, Ford, and Plymouth constituted what could be called the “Low-Priced Three.” For many of those years, while they weren’t in the Cadillac, Lincoln, or Imperial class price-wise, prestige-wise and otherwise, they could typically be ladled up with options. Many an Impala, […] The post The 1973 Caprice was luxury for a low price appeared first on Hagerty Media.

a person sitting in a car: Thomas Klockau © Provided by Hagerty Thomas Klockau a person sitting in a car: Thomas Klockau © Provided by Hagerty Thomas Klockau

1976 was the last year for these truly uncompromising, fully full-sized luxury Oldsmobiles. Ninety-Eights, along with their slightly less Broughamtastic Delta 88 siblings, received a more squared-up nose and new grille but were otherwise largely unchanged. 1977 would bring newly downsized—or, perhaps, right-sized—88s and Ninety-Eights, but there was still something special about the 1971–76 big Oldsmobiles. At least, I’ve always thought so. We’ll never see their like again.

a toaster sitting next to a car: Thomas Klockau © Provided by Hagerty Thomas Klockau

The post The 1971–76 Olds Ninety-Eight was the thinking man’s Cadillac appeared first on Hagerty Media.

Super Bowl Ads: Automakers in the Game (and on the Sidelines) .
Commercials will be different this year, with fewer automotive brands and more feelings. GM has gotten the most attention leading up to Sunday's game, but Jeep might have a big surprise. The unpredictability and unknowns of pandemic life have, however, impacted the Super Bowl's most reliable players: its advertisers."In a normal year, Super Bowl advertising resembles a multiple-car pileup," AdAge wrote this week. Fiat Chrysler alone aired five Super Bowl ads in 2018. In the past five years, Audi has aired four spots, Kia five, Hyundai six—not including two from Genesis.

usr: 3
This is interesting!