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Family & Relationships Here’s How to Have a Financially Healthy Relationship, No Matter Who’s the Breadwinner

18:45  06 february  2020
18:45  06 february  2020 Source:   glamour.com

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Here McLay explores how to have a healthy financial relationship with your partner— no matter who ' s bringing home the bacon. Couples are comfortable getting physically naked with each other, but more often than not they're uncomfortable getting financially naked.

Here McLay explores how to have a healthy financial relationship with your partner— no matter who ' s bringing home the bacon. Couples are comfortable getting physically naked with each other, but more often than not they're uncomfortable getting financially naked.

  Here’s How to Have a Financially Healthy Relationship, No Matter Who’s the Breadwinner © Jose Luis Pelaez Inc/GettyImages More women than ever before are the breadwinners in their household. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 38% of wives outearn their husband. And while the aim should be to have a financial split that makes sense for each couple, research shows that this particular brand of imbalance can make some uncomfortable. So much so that some women lie about their earnings.

The New York Times has reported that in heterosexual marriages in which women earn more, wives will tell the Internal Revenue Service they earned 1.5% less than they actually do. Meanwhile the husbands will falsely claim to have earned 2.9% more than they do.

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“In a healthy relationship , you feel your partner is also a great friend who enjoys sharing myriad life experiences with you, both the mundane and the exciting.” Here ’ s How to Have a Financially Healthy Relationship , No Matter Who ’ s the Breadwinner .

Here ’ s How To Make It Work. Apparently this is still a problem for men. The reality of being a female breadwinner . After she and her husband were married, Jessica received a job offer I think we have a really healthy , respectful, communicative and strong marriage because of how we have respected

This week's guest on She Makes Money Moves (a new podcast from Glamour and iHeartRadio) makes more than her husband. But the problem in their relationship isn't that she has a bigger paycheck; it's their different spending habits. Her husband is frugal, which makes her feel guilty when she spends money. She's now expecting a baby and she's worried she'll feel even more reluctant to spend anything on herself once they have a child. To help her navigate her spending anxiety, Barry welcomed Shannon McLay, founder and CEO of the Financial Gym, to the podcast. Here McLay explores how to have a healthy financial relationship with your partner—no matter who's bringing home the bacon.

Be up-front about your money goals.

Have a conversation about both of your money goals. This will allow you and your partner to dream together and then plan together. You can discuss things like: Where do you see yourselves going in life? Do you want to own property? Do you want to have a family? Where do you want to live? Do you foresee any career pivots in the future? Is traveling a priority? All of these questions are important to answer and align on when deciding to enter (or stay in) a long-term committed relationship with someone. Especially when there's an imbalance in income.

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But how a person reacts when feeling jealous is what matters . There' s no way you can have a In a healthy relationship , everyone needs to make compromises. But that doesn't mean you should So someone who has lived around violent or disrespectful behavior may not have learned how to treat

The proportion of women who carry the main financial ­responsibility for their family has increased by about 50% since It doesn’t really matter to me who pays for what. I try to contribute financially by being efficient: I have a household budget that I stick to, and will save money by cooking everything

Get financially naked.

Couples are comfortable getting physically naked with each other, but more often than not they're uncomfortable getting financially naked. Opening up about your finances is an important step in a relationship, and it's one I encourage couples to do early and often. What does this mean? Each person should lay out their assets, debts, expenses, and personal financial goals they’re working on. Doing this can help ease any discomfort around deciding who pays for what, or how you plan your dates and vacations together. But more important, it will help you understand each other’s priorities when it comes to your overall financial health.

Transition from viewing money as "mine" and "yours" to "ours."

If you and your partner are working toward the same goals, then both of your incomes will feel like they are the tools getting you to those goals, together. Thinking about your finances as shared money going toward a shared future will make you and your partner feel less competitive and instead, more collaborative. Because if you’re constantly deciding how to split things up and the "fairness" of the division, the relationship can begin to feel more like splitting the bills with a roommate and not an intimate life partner.

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What makes for a financially healthy relationship with your significant other? Takeaway: Some couples find sharing the financial burden difficult, especially those who came of age during the “ To have the faintest chance for success a financially healthy relationship must be based on trust and

We may know what a healthy relationship looks like, but most people have no idea how to get one Mutuality is about knowing that both people have needs, and that both sets of needs matter . And this brings me back to my point that we need to be teaching people how to have healthy relationships .

She Makes Money Moves is a new podcast from Glamour and iHeartRadio. Hosted by Glamour editor in chief Samantha Barry, the podcast shares intimate, unscripted stories from women across the country along with advice from financial experts to help guide those women—and women everywhere—forward.

According to a survey by Fidelity, the sponsor ofShe Makes Money Moves, 80% of women aren’t talking about money with the people closest to them.

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