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FoodThe Genius Secrets to Never-Boring, Never-Dry Pork Tenderloin

00:30  08 november  2018
00:30  08 november  2018 Source:   food52.com

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The Genius Secrets to Never - Boring , Never - Dry Pork Tenderloin . Weeknights, meet a Puerto Rican classic. Pork tenderloin is ever-popular because it’s ever-convenient: A neatly-contained roast that cooks swiftly and feeds a family, it’s the filet mignon of the other white meat world (with a much more

Every week in Genius recipes– often with your help! – Food52 Creative Director and Lifelong Genius Hunter Kristen Miglore discovers recipes that will change your way of cooking. Pork tenderloin is always popular because it's always practical: a clean-roasted roast that cooks fast and feeds a family

Every week in Genius Recipes—often with your help!—Food52 Creative Director and lifelong Genius-hunter Kristen Miglore is unearthing recipes that will change the way you cook.

The Genius Secrets to Never-Boring, Never-Dry Pork Tenderloin© Provided by Food52

Pork tenderloin is ever-popular because it’s ever-convenient: A neatly-contained roast that cooks swiftly and feeds a family, it’s the filet mignon of the other white meat world (with a much more reasonable price tag).

So why is it so prone to turning dry and sad? And why do we keep letting it?

The Genius Secrets to Never-Boring, Never-Dry Pork Tenderloin© Provided by Food52

Because with these conveniences come all the challenges of cooking a lean, tender hunk of meat—there’s no flavorful fat or other goodness to hide behind, especially if we dare overcook it.

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Our 7 Most Popular Slow-Cooker Recipes of All Time You know what they say: Slow and steady wins the race. When it comes to cozy, flavor-packed soups, stews, sauces, and ginormous pork tenderloins, we couldn't agree more. There's a lot to love about slow-cooked dinners. You can simply set them—and forget them—for one. Then, there's the fact that the gentle heat over an hours-long period makes for the tenderest bites, and the jammiest, best-tasting sauces or broths. Oh, and there's the way they make your home (or, in my case, tiny apartment) fill with a scent so tantalizing and irresistible, you wish you could pack a bag and move right into your Crock-Pot.

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But Von Diaz—writer, radio producer, and author of the cookbook Coconuts & Collards—is sitting on the secret to not-at-all boring or dry pork tenderloin. (It’s not using a slow-cooker, in spite of what our most popular Pinterest recipe ever would have you believe.)

In an ode to her mother, a working parent who always preferred her meats light and lean, Diaz seasons and marinates tenderloin like pernil, a Puerto Rican dish that's traditionally made with pork shoulder and roasted low and slow for several hours. Because tenderloin can cook much faster and hotter and stay tender, you get to pernil in under 30 minutes.

The marinade is key: a simple, versatile wet adobo—a citrusy-garlicky-herby paste—that’s used to marinate all sorts of meat in Puerto Rican cuisine (Diaz has three templates in her book, for chicken or seafood, pork, and beef).

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Weekly Meal Plan: Roast Chicken, Pork Tenderloin , and Three Genius Nextovers: Sticky, Fall-Apart Oven-Barbecued Chicken—No Grill Required These While that extra, simply-seasoned chicken is still warm, pull the meat from the bones and refrigerate it. The Genius Secrets to Never - Boring

Pork tenderloin is ever-popular because it’s ever-convenient: A neatly-contained roast that cooks swiftly and The Genius Secrets to the Very Best Hawaiian Pizza (Haters, Welcome!) Every week in Genius Recipes—often with your help!—Food52 Creative Director and lifelong Genius -hunter Kristen

You can mash the adobo together with whatever tool you have on hand—a traditional wooden pilón or mortar and pestle, a mini food processor like Diaz and her mom use, or even the side of a big knife against a cutting board, if that’s all you’ve got. After poking some holes in your tenderloin and massaging in the adobo, you’re all but done, and it’s time to let the marinade go to work for anywhere from 30 minutes to overnight.

But what might be best of all is the sauce. By adding more lemon juice to the roasting pan at the end to free all the good browned bits, Diaz makes a bright, intensely delicious pan sauce, without fuss. Repeat this trick with any meat you roast or sear, then try not to eat the pan you made it on.

The Genius Secrets to Never-Boring, Never-Dry Pork Tenderloin© Provided by Food52

Von Diaz’ Pork Tenderloin Pernil Style

By Genius Recipes

Pork Tenderloin Pernil Style

  • 3 pounds pork tenderloin (around 2 to 3 small tenderloins)
  • Adobo for Pork (below)
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice (or more, to taste)

Adobo for Pork (for 3 pounds pork tenderloin, scale up or down as needed)

  • 3 medium garlic cloves, finely minced
  • 3/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 3 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 3 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons fresh lime, lemon, or sour orange juice

View Full Recipe


The Genius Secret to Juicy Turkey Burgers (Chicken and Pork Burgers, Too).
Every week in Genius Recipes—often with your help!—Food52 Creative Director and lifelong Genius-hunter Kristen Miglore is unearthing recipes that will change the way you cook. Photo by Ty Mecham Who among us hasn’t been burned by a dry turkey burger before? (Or chicken, or pork, or even beef, that time whoever was in charge of shopping went down a dark path and bought the 98% lean mix.) I had an especially dismal one just recently at the burger joint across the street from my apartment. Fool me, I don’t know, a hundred times? But I never gave up hope. And I finally found a sure thing for juicy, unreasonably good lean-meated burgers in Niloufer Ichaporia King’s 2007 James Beard Award-winning cookbook My Bombay Kitchen, a memoir and archive of the recipes and techniques from her heritage in the Parsi community in India. Photo by Ty Mecham Lean meat, as a rule, needs help—whether that’s leaning on richer ingredients or dry-brining or just a really good marinade. Or, as King does here, inspired by traditional Parsi kebabs, by jamming that meat full of moisture (and flavor) with a mess of herbs, alliums, ginger, and chiles. There is a greater proportion of raw vegetable matter here than I’d ever have thought wise to mix into a burger, for fear of lingering chunks of raw ginger, onion, and chile.

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