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FoodIf You Can Open a Cheap Beer, You Can Make This Cocktail

23:02  12 july  2019
23:02  12 july  2019 Source:   bonappetit.com

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If You Can Open a Cheap Beer, You Can Make This Cocktail© Photo by Alex Lau, Food Styling by Rebecca Jurkevich, Prop Styling by Kalen Kaminski

Welcome to Party Tricks, a monthly column in which bestselling cookbook author and entertaining pro Alison Roman schools us on the fine art of having people over without pulling out your hair.

You could technically refer to a shandy as a beer cocktail. And while this wouldn’t be wrong, making one takes about as much effort as cracking open a beer. A shandy, loosely defined as beer poured over ice and topped with a tart-sweet mixer, is a gloriously unfussy drink.

It’s all about honoring the tenets of summer, which include consuming alcohol and quenching thirst—ideally simultaneously. If the thought of drinking beer on ice horrifies you, lest the dilution degrade the integrity of the brew or whatever, know that I‘m talking about using the cheap stuff, not some hopped-up IPA or chocolaty stout.

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The shandy is especially friendly for hot-weather gatherings that last well into the evening since it’s the kind of low-ABV all-day sipper that keeps you in check (and, uh, hydrated?). I recommend staying away from hard alcohol while the sun's out—daytime drinking is a marathon, not a sprint.

If You Can Open a Cheap Beer, You Can Make This Cocktail© Photo by Alex Lau, Food Styling by Rebecca Jurkevich, Prop Styling by Kalen Kaminski Bonus points if you add a paper umbrella.

Making shandies for a crowd requires almost nothing on your part. The ingredients are store-bought, the drink is built right in a cup (no pitchers needed), and people can make their own, regardless of skill level.

Here’s how it’s done: Just fill a tall glass of ice two-thirds of the way with the inexpensive beer of your choice (I’m a Tecate woman), then top with any number of refreshing drinks such as Ting, lemonade, or kombucha to taste. And although this low-key drink is antithetical to garnish of any sort, I wouldn’t say no to one of those cute paper umbrellas.

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Ask Kate About Beer: When and why did breweries stop using pop-top cans?.
The Takeout’s resident beer expert answers everything you’ve ever wanted to know about beer. Have a question? Shoot it to [email protected] Hey Kate, Recently when I was out hiking, I found an old rusty beer can with a pull-tab. I’m curious how old it is. When did breweries stop using these? And why? Thanks, Kenny Hey Kenny, I can’t resist a beer question that lets me do a bit of historical digging. Beer and soda cans have gone through three major stages in the U.S. The first earliest beer cans, which debuted in 1935, sported a flat top that required a tool called a church key to open.

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