Food: Here’s Why We Pass Out Candy on Halloween - - PressFrom - US
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Food Here’s Why We Pass Out Candy on Halloween

02:15  18 october  2019
02:15  18 october  2019 Source:   rd.com

This Is The Most Popular Halloween Candy in America

  This Is The Most Popular Halloween Candy in America After gathering 12 years of sales data, CandyStore.com was able to determine the most popular Halloween candy in America—and it's not what you'd expect!Here are the 50 Best and Worst Halloween Candies—Ranked.

Sure, candy ' s a big part of lots of our holidays in the United States—but why is Halloween the one where we go door-to-door asking for it? If you grew up in a Halloween -celebrating family and/or a walking-friendly neighborhood, you likely have fond memories of rushing from house to house

Once candy companies realized that trick-or-treating was here to stay, they attempted to capitalize on the holiday, shifting attention away from their They focused on getting shopkeepers to promote candy as the thing to pass out on Halloween . Back in the 1950 s and 1960 s , kids could expect to get

If you grew up in a Halloween-celebrating family and/or a walking-friendly neighborhood, you likely have fond memories of rushing from house to house collecting candy. But that tradition has an interesting history. While activities reminiscent of today's trick-or-treating have been around since ancient times, actual candy probably hasn't been part of it for as long as you think.

a little girl sitting on a table© Mcimage/Shutterstock

The holiday of Halloween can trace its origins back more than 2,000 years, to the ancient Celts and their harvest celebration, Samhain. This celebration is also a big reason the traditional colors of Halloween are black and orange. Celebrants believed that halfway between the autumnal equinox and the winter solstice, right around October 31 and November 1, the gateway between the worlds of the living and the dead was weakened. So they would prepare for the presence of deceased spirits by offering up food and drink to the wandering spirits.

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Here , we ’ll break down the history of trick or treating, because it really is fascinating how the Halloween tradition came But Halloween as we know it is a mashup of both pagan and Christian influences, as filtered Halloween is still the “ Candy Holiday” today. Mars was ahead of the curve, but other candy

I will be making more Halloween videos. I am trying to get to 20 Subscribers, if we get to 20 Subscribers I will do a room tour. Hope you enjoy!! If you

As the holiday evolved into the Middle Ages, it gained religious significance. People now participated in All Souls' Day, on November 2, by going to wealthier people's homes and offering to pray for their deceased loved ones in exchange for money or food. And this practice, known as "souling," evolved into a fun one for children, who would also go from home to home. But instead of offering prayers, they would sing or tell a joke and receive a treat, like coins or fruit, in exchange. Starting to sound familiar? Learn more about how this happened with our comprehensive history of Halloween and why we celebrate it.

Before the 19th century, these trick-or-treating precursors were really only popular in Ireland and Scotland. But during that century, immigrants began coming to the United States from Ireland and Scotland, in many cases to avoid famine. They brought the celebration, now known as Halloween, with them.

Here’s Why We Pass Out Candy on Halloween

  Here’s Why We Pass Out Candy on Halloween Sure, candy's a big part of lots of our holidays in the United States—but why is Halloween the one where we go door-to-door asking for it? The post Here’s Why We Pass Out Candy on Halloween appeared first on Taste of Home.

The modern tradition of passing out candy to trick-or-treaters on Halloween is likely based on the medieval custom of "souling" on All Souls' Day. Early Christians made currant-topped desserts called "soul cakes" to honor their dead on All Souls' Day, and children would walk from house to house

If you think about Halloween for what it is — a day where children dress up in costumes and walk door to door for candy — it does seem pretty random. You know, just an explanation as to why we celebrate such an interesting holiday. Clearly, these traditions are deeply rooted to a semi-unearthed

Now in semi-modern times: the holiday gained popularity, especially among young people, in the early 20th century before celebrations declined due to the Great Depression and World War II. And when people did "celebrate," it was with more malicious pranks like vandalism. But once the 1950s hit, the holiday came back—and the increasing suburbanization helped establish the practice of kid-friendly trick-or-treating as we know it today. As for the candy? Well, candy companies in the post–war ration era were growing, and they began realizing what a gold mine this holiday could be. That's how we got the now-ubiquitous Halloween-themed candy surge that descends upon our retailers every fall. Today, Americans spend a lot of money on treats for this holiday. Learn exactly how much—plus some other fascinating facts about Halloween candy.

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This is the most hated Halloween candy in America

  This is the most hated Halloween candy in America Halloween is great, and candy is great, but not all Halloween candy is great. While we can all (mostly) agree that Skittles, Reese’s, Laffy Taffy and Snickers are tasty, there is one treat that is not just divisive, it’s the most hated Halloween candy in America. Yes, it is candy corn. The Rudest Trick-or-Treating Mistakes Candystore.com surveyed more than 40,000 of their customers, and that orange, yellow and white candy with a distinctive milky, sugary taste and chewy texture came out as the most detested Halloween offering.

“If you don’t want to hand out candy , replace it with a healthy alternative treat. But substituting junk food with junky plastic crap isn’t much better in my opinion.” So my thought process is that children will still get PLENTY of candy on Halloween even if a few of us decide to hand out something different.

Trick-or-treating for candy on Halloween seems like such an inextricable part of American culture that it' s hard to believe the ritual is a fairly modern trend. By the 19th century, these had become cookies spiced with coriander, caraway, and sometimes ginger, which would be handed out to children.


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usr: 1
This is interesting!