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Food Toddler Thriving After Doctors Cure Her Seizures by Intentionally Inducing Strokes in Her Brain

01:40  26 october  2019
01:40  26 october  2019 Source:   msn.com

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Toddler Thriving After Doctors Cure Her Seizures by Intentionally Inducing Strokes in Her Brain . Instead of cutting into the baby’s brain , Chang and her fellow doctors instead purposefully induced repeated strokes to kill off the bad tissue that was causing seizures .

A stroke is a medical condition in which poor blood flow to the brain results in cell death. There are two main types of stroke : ischemic, due to lack of blood flow, and hemorrhagic, due to bleeding.

When Bella Hauschildt was born in August 2018, she looked like the average, healthy baby girl. But one day later, twitching in her eyes lead to the discovery that the left side of her brain hid severe complications.

a girl wearing a pink hat: Bella Hauschildt© Ambre and Mark Hauschildt Bella Hauschildt

Bella had hemimegalencephaly, or HME, a rare disorder that causes half of the brain to grow overly large and abnormal, causing constant seizures.

“Bella was only a couple of days old. It was devastating news,” her grandmother, Ann Getting, said in a story with Children’s National Hospital in Washington, D.C., where Bella eventually went for treatment. “They told us about all kinds of potential disabilities. They also said it would be extremely difficult to control her seizures with medications.”

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'[ Doctors ] are saying it could possibly be something in the tone of his voice, something like that, but it doesn't happen when I hear Usher, or people like him Doctors removed the majority of Fennessy's left temporal lobe, which relieved some epilepsy symptoms, but she still has a seizure every time she

A seizure occurs when the brain functions abnormally, resulting in a change in movement, attention, or level of awareness. 4 Different types of seizures may occur in different parts of the brain . All children who seize for the first time and many with a known seizure disorder should be evaluated by a doctor .

Because HME is so rare, there are few treatment methods. The typical approach is to open up the skull and remove half of the brain — the left side is not necessary to function normally — to eliminate the tissue that is causing the seizures. But they would have to wait until Bella was 3 months old to safely operate.

a person holding a baby: Bella Hauschildt© Provided by Meredith Corporation Bella Hauschildt

At that point, though, waiting was also too risky. Bella was already having 20 to 40 nonstop seizures each hour, even with seizure medication, and if they waited, her IQ would go down 10 to 20 points a month.

“Her seizures were so bad, her quality of life would have been negatively impacted if we waited,” her grandfather, David Getting, said.

The Gettings contacted a good friend, pediatrician Dr. Amy Mashburn, who got to work researching alternative treatments. That led her to Children’s National, where Dr. Taeun Chang, director of the Neonatal Neurology and Neonatal Neurocritical Care Program, had successfully treated a baby girl with the same disorder.

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Toddler who had 20 seizures a day cured after doctors disconnect half of her brain . Milly Johnson, three, had fits almost every hour, and even suffered a stroke after developing Kawasaki But in a bid to halt the fits, doctors came up with a drastic solution - and completely shut down the left

How will the doctor treat my toddler 's fever? If your child is reasonably alert and taking fluids and has no other symptoms that suggest a serious Fevers can sometimes cause febrile seizures in babies and young children. They're most common in children between the ages of 6 months and 5 years.

a man holding a baby: Bella and her grandfather, David Getting | Ambre and Mark Hauschildt© Ambre and Mark Hauschildt Bella and her grandfather, David Getting | Ambre and Mark Hauschildt

Instead of cutting into the baby’s brain, Chang and her fellow doctors instead purposefully induced repeated strokes to kill off the bad tissue that was causing seizures. Using a micro-catheter, surgeons led by Dr. Monica Pearl go through the femoral artery in the thigh up to the blood vessels in the brain, and carefully put liquid embolic agents, a type of surgical glue, to block blood flow and force the tissue to die.

The procedure, being very new, also held risks, but the Gettings said it “didn’t take long” to decide on that option.

“You proceed with a treatment that offers more hope. You grab hope with both hands. You have the courage to try something that could have a much better outcome,” Ann said.

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  Woman Opens Up About 'Scary' Times She Forgot Husband After Seizures: 'It Made Me Angry' Sometimes she would just lose short term memories, like what she’d learned in school that week or who the president was. Other times the gaps were more frightening. “I’d forget my friends, so it was really hard to keep or maintain a friendship sometimes,” says Hannah, now 25. She filled in the blanks with what people told her. And sometimes the memories came back on their own. Still, she adds, “I know there’s a lot I don’t remember.”After graduating high school, Hannah attended Hutchinson Community College and reconnected with Cody Reinert, with whom she went to preschool.

Mild traumatic brain injury may affect your brain cells temporarily. More-serious traumatic brain injury can result in bruising, torn tissues, bleeding and other physical damage to the brain . These injuries can result in long-term complications or death.

Doctors suggested an experimental anti- seizure drug being used on dogs. Paige took her daughter to Chicago to see a Dravet specialist, who put the child on a ketogenic diet frequently Today, Charlotte, 6, is thriving . Her seizures only happen two to three times per month, almost solely in her sleep.

Before Bella turned 1 month old, the Children’s National team started inducing “controlled” strokes in her brain in three procedures spread out over several weeks. That successfully stopped 98 percent of the problems in her left brain.

Bella was adopted in October while she was still recovering at Children’s National and reliant on multiple seizure medications that made her lethargic.

“She was very sedated as her brain healed from the procedures,” Ambre Hauschildt, her adoptive mom, said. “She didn’t cry. She didn’t have any emotion and, because of the early brain damage, it wasn’t clear if she would ever show emotion. She was just a very quiet, very sleepy, very frail baby with a big question mark over her future.”

a man and a woman sitting on a bench: Ambre, Mark and Bella Hauschildt | Ambre and Mark Hauschildt© Ambre and Mark Hauschildt Ambre, Mark and Bella Hauschildt | Ambre and Mark Hauschildt

But Bella slowly improved, and doctors began to take down her medications, which snapped her out of the fog.

“She was smiling. She was crying. She was learning to suck her thumb. She was looking at us; her eyes would follow us,” Ambre said. “She was very much doing normal baby things: being fussy, wanting to be held — when she didn’t care before.”

Now 13 months old and at home in Iowa with Ambre and her adoptive father, Mark, Bella is down to three seizure medications and doing extremely well.

a little girl sitting at a table with a birthday cake: Bella Hauschildt | Ambre and Mark Hauschildt© Ambre and Mark Hauschildt Bella Hauschildt | Ambre and Mark Hauschildt

“She has not had a seizure since Dr. Chang did the procedures. No seizures. No side effects. You would never know she has epilepsy,” Ambre said. “It’s pretty amazing. We’re beyond proud of her. We celebrate all the little things: just seeing her hold her head up, learning to reach for things, and, of course, now she’s talking. She’s done all these things we didn’t know when or if she’d be able to do.”

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