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Food 8 Food Words That Have no Translation in English

22:50  19 july  2017
22:50  19 july  2017 Source:   foodandwine.com

11 English Words That Make More Sense When You Know Their Arabic Roots

  11 English Words That Make More Sense When You Know Their Arabic Roots What kind of mating is a checkmate? What kind of hair is mohair? What does a fanfare have to do with fans? It all makes sense when you go back to the Arabic roots of these words.I happened to solve a lot of these moments of etymological crisis just by studying Arabic (as detailed in my book All Strangers Are Kin: Adventures in Arabic and the Arab World), which is at the root of some seemingly English-through-and-through words. Granted, the Arabic is sometimes hard to recognize, usually because it has been filtered through French or Spanish. But trust me, it’s there—and it just might answer some of your most nagging linguistic questions.

Learning a new language every time you travel is a little too much to ask, but there’s another way to sharpen your language skills: Expedia put together a list of eight food -related words , called the International Language of Food, that have no equivalent in English . One of the best ways to get to know a new culture is through their food, so understanding how people think and speak about eating will give you a kickstart to making friends or impressing your host on your next vacation. These words give events like joining friends for drinks outdoors, going on a picnic

As extensive as the English language might be, other languages continue to have many words that are completely absent! This list has 30 words from all around the world with no exact english equivalents and maybe you’ll find some of these interesting or perhaps even be motivated to pick up 3. Sobremesa. (Spanish) The moment after eating a meal when the food is gone but the conversation is still flowing at the table. Usually after the main meal of the day where the Spanish often linger on at the table drinking coffee, chatting, playing cards or watching TV before returning to work later in the

  8 Food Words That Have no Translation in English © Hero Images / Getty Images

Trying to grasp the colloquial language in a new country can be one of the most intimidating aspects of traveling abroad. You want to sound hip and in the know; you don’t want to be that person laughing nervously and nodding at jokes and references you don’t understand. Learning a new language every time you travel is a little too much to ask, but there’s another way to sharpen your language skills: Expedia put together a list of eight food-related words, called the International Language of Food, that have no translation in English.

One of the best ways to get to know a new culture is through their food, so understanding how people think and speak about eating will give you a kick start to making friends or impressing your host on your next vacation. These words give joining friends for drinks outdoors, going on a picnic, or enjoying a spirited conversation at the dinner table, simple, elegant packaging.

We Tried Shake Shack's New Breakfast Menu—Here's the Verdict

  We Tried Shake Shack's New Breakfast Menu—Here's the Verdict The beloved burger and shake joint is upping the breakfast game with its line of sandwiches and pastries. If the long line wrapped around Madison Square Park in New York City is any indication, people absolutely love Shake Shack’s burgers, fries, chicken sandwiches, and of course milkshakes. Enough to wait hours in line and brave the freezing (or scorching!) temps just to get their hands on a ShackBurger and brownie batter milkshake. But the original Shake Shack is upping its fan-favorite menu by getting into the breakfast game, offering up a new line of breakfast sandwiches, pastries, and morning beverages including cold brew coffee and orange juice.

Gemütlichkeit doesn't have an exact English translation . Imagine sitting in a warm room with a coffee and a good book while it's snowing outside. Japanese has an entire part of speech with no English equivalent. We just took the word because it is the perfect description to one of the perfect foods .

Here are 23 words with no direct English translations : Schadenfreude Language: German Meaning: A feeling of enjoyment that comes from seeing or hearing about the troubles of other people. Lagom Language: Swedish Meaning: Associated with moderation, the word means not too much, not too little, but just the right amount. Hygge Language: Danish Meaning: The act of relaxing with loved ones and good friends, usually while enjoying food and drink; the word is associated with coziness.

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Here are eight foreign-language food words and exactly how to define them:

Use this trick to get a freshly prepared McDonald's burger, every time

  Use this trick to get a freshly prepared McDonald's burger, every time If the old, stale burgers sitting in the warming rack don't appeal to you, get a freshly made sandwich, just for you! © Provided by Gourmandize Craving a fresh, hot-off-the-grill burger? Craving a fresh, hot-off-the-grill burger?Technically, McDonald's burgers can only be stored on the rack for up to 10 minutes after being prepared, but if you think the rules have been bent, or think this is already too long, then this trick will help you get a fresh burger made up, on the spot.It all comes down to special requests.

It can translate to life and soul in English but both of these words are too broad to express what can means. It basically means “the non-material substance that keeps humans and animals alive and leaves as the being dies” according to TDK (Turkish Language Association dictionary. oturtma (a food name): in word base translation , we can translate it like “x sitting”. x can be potato or eggplant. lacivert (a color name): very very dark blue. but it is not the same color with dark blue. “lacivert” is a little more special. baldız, bacanak, elti, görümce (the words used for family relationships): for Turks

Although most words in the English language are either derived from other languages or are coined using roots from other languages, there are English words that were invented from whole cloth. For example: Blatant (invented by Edmund Spenser in his epic poem The Faerie Queene in 1596). Technical or engineering terms in English for inventions developed in one country tend to have no direct translation in other languages. For example: “headlight” or “headlamp” has no direct translation in Filipino-Tagalog so the word “headlight” with its original spelling was adopted and is always used

Sobremesa: “Over the table”

This Spanish word means to linger at the dinner table to continue your conversation (or debate, romantic monologue, or stand up comedy routine), long after the meal has finished.

Shemomechama: “I accidentally ate the whole thing.”

  8 Food Words That Have no Translation in English © ImagesBazaar / Getty Images

This Georgian phrase refers to gorging yourself on a meal—whether it’s pasta, cake, or pizza—even after you're full.

Natmad: “Night food”

  8 Food Words That Have no Translation in English © Kelvin Murray / Getty Images

No, this Danish phrase doesn’t mean a midnight snack you sneak out of your fridge. It actually refers to food served to guests at the end of a party, so they don’t go home hungry. Sounds like the Danes really know how to treat their friends.

Kummerspeck: “Grief bacon”

  8 Food Words That Have no Translation in English © Jens Koenig / Getty Images

How could eating bacon ever be a sad occasion, you might be wondering? Actually, in German, this word means gain weight while emotionally eating your way through a breakup.

Most Americans Wouldn’t Go to the Gym If You Paid Them, According to a New Study

  Most Americans Wouldn’t Go to the Gym If You Paid Them, According to a New Study In 2000, there were 32.8 million memberships to fitness centers or health clubs in the United States on file, according to Statista. In 2016, that number had leaped to 57.25 million memberships. Americans seem to sign up for gyms more and more, and if you believe in the adage 'It’s the thought that counts,' then the U.S. is chock-full of 57.25 million body-builders. However, despite how much we seem willing to pay for gym memberships, it seems that when it actually comes down to going to the gym itself, we won’t go even if we were paid.

The English language has more than 1 million words . Nevertheless, it’s difficult to find an exact translation for certain Russian words , especially if the meaning is related to the enigmatic "Russian soul." 1. Poshlost. Russian-American writer Vladimir Nabokov, who lectured on Slavic Studies to students in America, admitted Vladimir Nabokov wrote that, "Not one word in English can transmit all the nuances of toska (тоска). This is a feeling of spiritual suffering without any particular reason. On a less dolorous level, it’s the indistinct pain of the soul…vague anxiety, nostalgia, amorous longing."

It also has options to translate pages yourself using shortcodes if you feel the Google/Bing translations are inaccurate, allows you to translate a page phrase-by-phrase with suggestions from both Google and Bing as you translate . What is a word in English that translated to another language is a word that almost means the same thing but not exactly the same, but that is the closest translation ?

Utepils: “Outside beer”

This Norwegian word means exactly what you think it does: Enjoying a drink outdoors.

Kalsarikannit: “Underwear drunkenness”

  8 Food Words That Have no Translation in English © RapidEye / Getty Images

Many people are probably familiar with this particular state of undress. The Finnish phrase means to drink at home alone in your underwear. After a long day at the office, who among us hasn’t indulged in a little kalsarikannit?

Madarlatta: “Bird seen”

This Hungarian word is a harder one to guess. It actually refers to any food that goes uneaten at a picnic—food that probably gets stolen by the birds.

Engili: “Defiled Food”

  8 Food Words That Have no Translation in English © bobbieo / Getty Images

Spoken in the Telegu language in South India, this word marks foods that has been half-eaten or already bitten. It doesn’t necessarily mean any hungry snackers should steer clear of the food item in question, so go ahead and finish the cookie.

GALLERY: You’re Probably Pronouncing These 30 Food Words Wrong [provided by The Daily Meal]

You’re Probably Pronouncing These 30 Food Words Wrong: <p>There’s no better way to make a fool of yourself <strong><span href=in a fancy restaurant than by horribly butchering the pronunciation of a menu item.

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You’re Probably Pronouncing These 30 Food Words Wrong

This article was originally published on FoodAndWine.com


Dictionary Editors Say This Is the Most Misused Word in the English Language .
A traffic jam when you’re already late. A free ride when you’ve already paid. The fact that the King James Bible is the most shoplifted book in the United States. One of these three things is an example of irony—the reversal of what is expected or intended. The other two (no offense to Alanis Morissette) are not. The difference between them may be one of the most rage-inducing linguistic misunderstandings you’re likely to read about on the Internet or hear about from the determined grammar nerds in your life.

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