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Food Why Japanese School Lunches Are the Best in the World

20:35  11 october  2017
20:35  11 october  2017 Source:   rd.com

The World’s Largest Hamburger Will Set You Back $8,000

  The World’s Largest Hamburger Will Set You Back $8,000 <p>Mallie says making the burger involved the whole family to honor his late wife, who passed away in 2016.</p>A restaurant in Southgate, Michigan, has brought the title for the world’s largest commercially sold burger back to America with a new menu item that weighs 1,793 pounds.

But for children in Japan , school lunches are a rich experience where culture, nutrition, and sustainability collide. Learn more about why Japanese children are the healthiest in the world .

Subscribe to Print: Get our Best Deal! Learn more about why Japanese children are the healthiest in the world . Pictures/REX/ShutterstockConsidering the fact that Japan has one of the world ’s lowest childhood obesity rates, the U.S. probably has a lot to learn from this country’s school lunches .

  Why Japanese School Lunches Are the Best in the World © Chameleons Eye/REX/Shutterstock Pictures/REX/Shutterstock

When Americans think of the lunch menu at their childhood school cafeterias, they probably imagine a shapeless, tasteless pile of mystery meat—plus some brown mush, to match. But for children in Japan, school lunches are a rich experience where culture, nutrition, and sustainability collide.

'Japan’s standpoint is that school lunches are a part of education, not a break from it,' Masahiro Oji, a government director of school health education in Japan, told the Washington Post.

Fare offered at schools in Japan is affordable, fresh, and made by the students themselves. And Japanese children don’t just eat the food they prepare; they learn about the nutritional and cultural elements of their meals, too. The food is grown locally and includes a balanced menu of rice, vegetables, fish, and soups. As a bonus, each meal costs just $2.50.

Back-to-school safety: How to tell if your child's backpack is too heavy

  Back-to-school safety: How to tell if your child's backpack is too heavy <p>Backpacks bulging with books are "causing more injuries: neck, back, shoulders, knees even," says Kate Carr, president of Safe Kids Worldwide.</p>TODAY national investigative correspondent Jeff Rossen was joined by Kate Carr, president of Safe Kids Worldwide, to kick off Back to School Checklist, a special Rossen Reports series with tips to keep your kids safe this school year.

If you’re tired of the low-value lunch options at your kid’s school , and want to be a bit more like the Japanese , try these unique school lunches for kids who hate sandwiches. Traveling this Summer? These Are the 7 Best Food Cities in the World .

Japan .

Japanese school lunches feature the kind of meals parents would cook at home, not ones you'd find at a fast food restaurant. 14 Weird and Wonderful Condiments Around The… 10 Healthy Recipes from Around the World . 10 Best -Ever Butter Chicken Recipes.

'Parents hear their kids talking about what they had for lunch,' Tatsuji Shino, the principal at Umejima Elementary School in Tokyo, told the Washington Post, 'and kids ask them to re-create the meals at home.'

Japanese students also learn cooperation and etiquette skills as they serve and clean up after each other. Learn more about why Japanese children are the healthiest in the world.

Considering the fact that Japan has one of the world’s lowest childhood obesity rates, the U.S. probably has a lot to learn from this country’s school lunches. A 2011 study found that American students who regularly ate the school lunch—where options include pizza, chicken tenders, and French fries—were 29 percent more likely to be obese than those who brought lunch from home.

For American parents who want to be a little more like the Japanese, try sending your child to school with these unique school lunches for kids who hate sandwiches.

High schooler's "Sit With Us" app tackles lunchtime bullying .
Inspired by her own experience being bullied, Natalie Hampton created an app to connect kids in need of company with welcoming students Our series "A More Perfect Union" aims to show that what unites us as Americans is far greater than what divides us. In this installment we introduce you to a young woman taking on bullying – one cafeteria at a time. Lunchtime bullying is a common Hollywood plot line. But it's also a painful reality in school cafeterias throughout the nation, reports CBS News' Jamie Yuccas.  "I was ostracized by everyone. I ate lunch alone every day. I was pushed into lockers.

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