Health & Fit: Why You're at a Higher Risk for Stroke if You Have Diabetes - - PressFrom - US
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Health & Fit Why You're at a Higher Risk for Stroke if You Have Diabetes

22:07  22 november  2017
22:07  22 november  2017 Source:   usnews.com

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The risk for stroke in men is 1.8 times higher compared with men who don’t have diabetes , says Dr. Robert S. Bernstein, associate professor of medicine, endocrinology, diabetes and Although you can’t control your risk for stroke entirely, there are some life changes you can make to lower your risk

Why There Are Higher Rates of Diabetes Among Hispanic People. Gomez’s situation is hardly unusual. While Hispanic people overall are estimated to be at a higher risk for diabetes , they’re not the Whether you ’ re newly diagnosed or have been living with diabetes for many years, online peer

Healthcare worker. wearing surgical gloves, checking man's throat as he drinks.: The risk for stroke in men is 1.8 times higher compared with men who don’t have diabetes. © (Getty Images) The risk for stroke in men is 1.8 times higher compared with men who don’t have diabetes.

A stroke interrupts the blood supply to your brain. It’s a serious medical condition that can lead to long-term disability and even death, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

When you have diabetes, you’re at a higher risk for having a stroke for a few reasons. First, people with Type 2 diabetes are more prone to a hardening of the arteries called atherosclerosis. Many times, hardening of the arteries occurs in people with certain risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure and dyslipidemia (high cholesterol), says Dr. Philip B. Gorelick, professor of translational science and molecular medicine at the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine and executive medical director at Mercy Health Hauenstein Neurosciences in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

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If you ’ re at increased risk , look at where you ’ re scoring points. Could you reduce your weight you have Type 2 diabetes your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, sometimes called prediabetes

Age: The older you are, the higher your risk for diabetes . Generally, Type 2 diabetes occurs in middle-aged adults, most History of gestational diabetes : If you developed diabetes during pregnancy, you are at increased risk . Why Diabetes Matters. Understand Your Risk for Diabetes .

The risk for stroke also rises because of long-term damage to blood vessels. “High blood sugars over time can lead to damage to blood vessels,” says Dr. David W. Lam, associate director of the Mount Sinai Diabetes Center in New York. “This can affect overall blood flow to the organs, including the brain, which then can result in a stroke.”

Cigarette smoking and lack of physical activity also raise your stroke risk.

Other factors that put you at a greater risk for stroke but that are outside of your control include:

  • A family history of stroke.
  • Older age.
  • Having sickle cell disease, heart failure, previous heart attacks or atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat).
  • Being black or Hispanic in the U.S.

All of those risk factors put someone with diabetes at a higher risk for having a stroke.

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If you have diabetes you are at higher risk for stroke and other cardiovascular diseases. Your blood sugar level over the past couple of months is indicated by the hemoglobin A1c test. The American Diabetes Association says that people with A1c levels above 7% are nearly three times as likely to

You ’ re at risk for developing gestational diabetes ( diabetes while pregnant) if you Gestational diabetes usually goes away after your baby is born but increases your risk for type 2 diabetes later in life. Your baby is more likely to become obese as a child or teen, and is more likely to develop type 2

In fact, the risk for stroke in women with diabetes is more than double that for women without diabetes. The risk for stroke in men is 1.8 times higher compared with men who don’t have diabetes, says Dr. Robert S. Bernstein, associate professor of medicine, endocrinology, diabetes and bone disease at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. Some estimates say the risk is even higher than the numbers stated above.

In the U.S., someone has a stroke every 40 seconds, according to Dr. José Biller, professor and chairperson in the department of neurology at the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine in Chicago. Biller is also a spokesperson for the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association. Someone dies of a stroke every four minutes. Although there are different kinds of strokes, the most common one is called an ischemic stroke, Biller says.

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Slideshow Smart Snacks When You ' re Pregnant. It's important to understand your risk and how you can lower it. Besides diabetes , do you also have : A waist that's larger than 35 inches in women or 40 inches in If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

When you have diabetes , you ’ re at a higher risk for an amputation, particularly an amputation of a lower limb or a toe. In fact, the American Diabetes Association And the five-year death rate for those who have had an amputation caused by a diabetic foot ulcer ranges from 35 percent to 80 percent.

Although you can’t control your risk for stroke entirely, there are some life changes you can make to lower your risk:

Get your blood sugar under control. In fact, health professionals are trying to target patients when they have prediabetes to ward off or delay full-blown Type 2 diabetes, Gorelick says. By doing this, they can help those patients avoid health complications such as stroke. Seek help from other health professionals, such as certified diabetes educators, if you need further help controlling your blood sugar. “It’s not clear whether tight control of diabetes is beneficial for stroke prevention, but diabetes control is important for general health,” Bernstein says.

Seek help for high blood pressure. “Risk of stroke in Type 2 diabetes is reduced with tight blood pressure control. Control of high blood pressure would prevent the greatest number of all stroke types,” Biller says. Again, this is something to get checked regularly and take any prescribed medicines.

Keep those appointments with your health care providers. Consistent medical follow-up can help ensure that your diabetes as well as any other medical conditions are monitored, treated and well-controlled, Lam advises. Use your medications as prescribed, and see your health care providers for regular checkups.

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Pregnancy If you ’ re pregnant, you most likely are not thinking about the possibility of having a stroke during pregnancy. However, it is possible, and the risk appears to be more prevalent Doctors are unsure why migraines with aura are associated with a higher risk of stroke in both men and women.

Diabetes and stroke share many risk factors, including metabolic syndrome (also called If you have diabetes , your chances of having a stroke are higher . Prolonged high blood glucose levels caused If you have diabetes and get a handle on it by maintaining healthy habits, you ’ re already less likely

Eat healthier and move more. “Lifestyle changes, including regular physical activity and a healthy diet, are important,” Bernstein says. “The diet should be low in sugar and saturated fat and should not have excessive calories.” Talk to your doctor, nurse or registered dietitian about lowering LDL cholesterol – also known as the “bad” cholesterol – in your diet as well.

Make other healthy changes in your life. This includes losing weight if you’re overweight and getting enough sleep, advises Dr. Christoph Buettner, professor of medicine, endocrinology, diabetes and bone disease at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

If you smoke, find ways to quit. The National Stroke Association recommends asking your doctor about aids such as nicotine patches, counseling and smoking cessation programs.

A stroke can come about suddenly. According to Buettner, some of the symptoms include:

  • A sudden weakness or numbness of the face, arm or leg on one side of the body.
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes.
  • Loss of speech or trouble speaking or understanding.
  • Unexplained dizziness.
  • Sudden falls.
  • A sudden severe headache with no known cause.

If you think you or someone you know is having a stroke, call 911 so they can be evaluated and treated at an emergency department.

The outcomes for a person who has had a stroke can vary greatly. “If a person gets to a center that has a stroke team and treatment starts within four hours, the clot which is blocking the artery can be dissolved or mechanically removed, and the severity of the damage will be reduced,” Bernstein says. Many people who have had strokes can regain function with physical therapy, but most also have some long-term effects, such as problems with speech, weakness on one side of the body and problems with thinking or awareness, Buettner says.

Breastfeeding for 6 mos cuts diabetes risk in half: study .
Women who breastfeed their babies for six months or more may be able to cut their risk of developing diabetes in the future by nearly half, according to a study Tuesday. The findings from a three-decade US study of more than 1,200 white and African-American women were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Internal Medicine.

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This is interesting!