•   
  •   
  •   

Health & Fit Why You're at a Higher Risk for Stroke if You Have Diabetes

22:07  22 november  2017
22:07  22 november  2017 Source:   usnews.com

This Is the Oldest Age You Can Possibly Live To (According to Science)

  This Is the Oldest Age You Can Possibly Live To (According to Science) Human life expectancies have gone up over the years. But, according to new research, our average maximum age ceiling hit a plateau decades ago. It’s no secret that humans have gotten really good at living longer. We know to eat right, to exercise, to take our vitamins, and to get our nightly eight hours. (And that doesn’t even account for the striding advancements modern medicine has made.) But no matter how smart way go about our quest for immortality, there’s only so far we can go.

The risk for stroke also rises because of long-term damage to blood vessels. “ High blood sugars over time can lead to damage to blood vessels,” says Dr. David W. Lam, associate director of the Mount Sinai Diabetes Center in New York. “This can affect overall blood flow to the organs, including the This includes losing weight if you ’ re overweight and getting enough sleep, advises Dr. Christoph Buettner, professor of medicine, endocrinology, diabetes and bone disease at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. If you smoke, find ways to quit. The National Stroke Association recommends asking

Yes, diabetic patients are at a higher risk of getting strokes . Many studies report that diabetes patients have a higher risk of heart diseases and stroke . It has been seen that a diabetic patient is 2-4 times more likely to face a stroke as compared to a person with normal glucose levels. In cases with normal glucose level, the arteries act as a bypass to overcome the deficiency of oxygen. However, a person with a high glucose level does not respond in the same manner in case of a stroke .

Healthcare worker. wearing surgical gloves, checking man's throat as he drinks.: The risk for stroke in men is 1.8 times higher compared with men who don’t have diabetes. © (Getty Images) The risk for stroke in men is 1.8 times higher compared with men who don’t have diabetes.

A stroke interrupts the blood supply to your brain. It’s a serious medical condition that can lead to long-term disability and even death, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

When you have diabetes, you’re at a higher risk for having a stroke for a few reasons. First, people with Type 2 diabetes are more prone to a hardening of the arteries called atherosclerosis. Many times, hardening of the arteries occurs in people with certain risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure and dyslipidemia (high cholesterol), says Dr. Philip B. Gorelick, professor of translational science and molecular medicine at the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine and executive medical director at Mercy Health Hauenstein Neurosciences in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Are These 'Healthy' Foods Really Good for You?

  Are These 'Healthy' Foods Really Good for You? TIME asked nutrition experts to give us the skinny on the health world’s latest food fads. Here’s what they said. TIME asked nutrition experts to give us the skinny on the health world’s latest food fads. Here’s what they said.

Strokes can run in families. You and your relatives may share a tendency to get high blood pressure or diabetes . Gender. Women are slightly less likely to have a stroke than men of the same age. But women have strokes at a later age, which make them less likely to recover and more likely to die as a result. Race. Strokes affect African-Americans and nonwhite Hispanic Americans much more often than any other group in the U.S. Sickle cell disease, a genetic condition that can narrow arteries and interrupt blood flow, is also more common in these groups and in people whose families came from

You double your risk of a stroke if you use tobacco. Nicotine in cigarettes raises blood pressure, and carbon monoxide in smoke lowers the amount of oxygen your blood can carry. Even breathing secondhand smoke can raise your chances of a stroke . If it’s not managed well, diabetes can lead to fatty deposits or clots inside your blood vessels. This can narrow the ones in your brain and neck and might cut off the blood supply to the brain. If you have diabetes , check your blood sugar regularly, take medications as prescribed, and see your doctor every few months so they can keep an eye on your

The risk for stroke also rises because of long-term damage to blood vessels. “High blood sugars over time can lead to damage to blood vessels,” says Dr. David W. Lam, associate director of the Mount Sinai Diabetes Center in New York. “This can affect overall blood flow to the organs, including the brain, which then can result in a stroke.”

Cigarette smoking and lack of physical activity also raise your stroke risk.

Other factors that put you at a greater risk for stroke but that are outside of your control include:

  • A family history of stroke.
  • Older age.
  • Having sickle cell disease, heart failure, previous heart attacks or atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat).
  • Being black or Hispanic in the U.S.

All of those risk factors put someone with diabetes at a higher risk for having a stroke.

Salt Intake Might Be A Diabetes Risk Factor, New Study Finds

  Salt Intake Might Be A Diabetes Risk Factor, New Study Finds You may already know that people with diabetes are advised to follow a low salt diet. Consuming less sodium can help lower blood pressure, subsequently decreasing the risk of heart attack and stroke, two common diabetes complications. (Check out the 2018 Prevention Calendar for 365 days of slimming secrets, health tips,You may already know that people with diabetes are advised to follow a low salt diet. Consuming less sodium can help lower blood pressure, subsequently decreasing the risk of heart attack and stroke, two common diabetes complications.

Diabetes when you ’ re expecting affects about 4% of all U.S. pregnancies. It's caused by hormones the placenta makes or by too little insulin. High blood sugar from the mother causes high blood sugar in the baby. 1. Frequent urination: If you have to make frequent trips to the toilet then you know that you may be diabetic . This is one of the most easily detectable symptoms of diabetes , where you roam about in the washroom frequently for urination . This is a serious problem and should be medically treated asap .

You could be at risk Stroke is sometimes called a “brain attack” because what usually occurs is similar to what happens during a heart attack. In the most common form of stroke , an obstruction blocks flow in a blood vessel that supplies the brain.A fatty deposit on blood vessel walls often gets And high blood sugar damages blood vessels throughout the body, causing numerous complications, including a higher risk for stroke .In fact, people with diabetes have a 1.5 times higher risk of having a stroke than people without the disease.Reduce it: Getting blood sugar under control includes many

In fact, the risk for stroke in women with diabetes is more than double that for women without diabetes. The risk for stroke in men is 1.8 times higher compared with men who don’t have diabetes, says Dr. Robert S. Bernstein, associate professor of medicine, endocrinology, diabetes and bone disease at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. Some estimates say the risk is even higher than the numbers stated above.

In the U.S., someone has a stroke every 40 seconds, according to Dr. José Biller, professor and chairperson in the department of neurology at the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine in Chicago. Biller is also a spokesperson for the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association. Someone dies of a stroke every four minutes. Although there are different kinds of strokes, the most common one is called an ischemic stroke, Biller says.

You Should Be Eating Bread at the END of Your Meal—Here’s Why

  You Should Be Eating Bread at the END of Your Meal—Here’s Why They say timing is everything, and they’re not just talking about relationships. There’s a right time to do just about anything if you want to make the most of your day. There’s a right time to eat dinner, for example. And now it turns out there’s a right time to eat carbs, and it’s not before dinner.As it turns out, whether or not eating bread is good for you depends on this one factor.

Men have a higher risk for stroke , but more women die from stroke . Men generally do not live as long as women, so men are usually younger when they have their strokes and therefore have a higher rate of survival. usually more severe and extensive than when blood glucose is well-controlled. Hypertension is common among diabetics and accounts for much of their increased stroke risk . Treating diabetes can delay the onset of complications that increase the risk of stroke . • Cholesterol imbalance.

Pregnancy-related risks . Your risk of developing type 2 diabetes increases if you developed gestational diabetes when you were pregnant or if you gave birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds (4 kilograms). Polycystic ovary syndrome. Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of heart disease, stroke , high blood pressure and narrowing of blood vessels (atherosclerosis). Nerve damage (neuropathy) in limbs. High blood sugar over time can damage or destroy nerves, resulting in tingling, numbness, burning, pain or eventual loss of feeling that usually begins at the tips of the toes

Although you can’t control your risk for stroke entirely, there are some life changes you can make to lower your risk:

Get your blood sugar under control. In fact, health professionals are trying to target patients when they have prediabetes to ward off or delay full-blown Type 2 diabetes, Gorelick says. By doing this, they can help those patients avoid health complications such as stroke. Seek help from other health professionals, such as certified diabetes educators, if you need further help controlling your blood sugar. “It’s not clear whether tight control of diabetes is beneficial for stroke prevention, but diabetes control is important for general health,” Bernstein says.

Seek help for high blood pressure. “Risk of stroke in Type 2 diabetes is reduced with tight blood pressure control. Control of high blood pressure would prevent the greatest number of all stroke types,” Biller says. Again, this is something to get checked regularly and take any prescribed medicines.

Keep those appointments with your health care providers. Consistent medical follow-up can help ensure that your diabetes as well as any other medical conditions are monitored, treated and well-controlled, Lam advises. Use your medications as prescribed, and see your health care providers for regular checkups.

Middle-Aged Women Are At High Risk For This Potentially Fatal Addiction

  Middle-Aged Women Are At High Risk For This Potentially Fatal Addiction And many don't even realize they’re on the path to dependence. And many don't even realize they’re on the path to dependence.

Eat healthier and move more. “Lifestyle changes, including regular physical activity and a healthy diet, are important,” Bernstein says. “The diet should be low in sugar and saturated fat and should not have excessive calories.” Talk to your doctor, nurse or registered dietitian about lowering LDL cholesterol – also known as the “bad” cholesterol – in your diet as well.

Make other healthy changes in your life. This includes losing weight if you’re overweight and getting enough sleep, advises Dr. Christoph Buettner, professor of medicine, endocrinology, diabetes and bone disease at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

If you smoke, find ways to quit. The National Stroke Association recommends asking your doctor about aids such as nicotine patches, counseling and smoking cessation programs.

A stroke can come about suddenly. According to Buettner, some of the symptoms include:

  • A sudden weakness or numbness of the face, arm or leg on one side of the body.
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes.
  • Loss of speech or trouble speaking or understanding.
  • Unexplained dizziness.
  • Sudden falls.
  • A sudden severe headache with no known cause.

If you think you or someone you know is having a stroke, call 911 so they can be evaluated and treated at an emergency department.

The outcomes for a person who has had a stroke can vary greatly. “If a person gets to a center that has a stroke team and treatment starts within four hours, the clot which is blocking the artery can be dissolved or mechanically removed, and the severity of the damage will be reduced,” Bernstein says. Many people who have had strokes can regain function with physical therapy, but most also have some long-term effects, such as problems with speech, weakness on one side of the body and problems with thinking or awareness, Buettner says.

Alert: Using Mouthwash Daily May Trigger a Serious Health Condition .
<p>To stave off this serious condition, limit your use of mouthwash to just twice per week.</p>Mouthwash may leave your breath minty fresh, but according to a recent study, frequent use can increase your chances of developing diabetes.

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!