•   
  •   
  •   

Health & Fit Mayor Eric Adams says New York will treat mentally ill, even if they refuse

07:50  30 november  2022
07:50  30 november  2022 Source:   latimes.com

With NYC plan for mentally ill, hospitals face complex task

  With NYC plan for mentally ill, hospitals face complex task NEW YORK (AP) — New York City's latest plan to keep mentally ill people from languishing in public is billed as a common-sense strategy to get them help. By encouraging police officers and city medics to take more psychologically disturbed people to hospitals, even if they refuse care, Mayor Eric Adams says he's humanely tackling a problem instead of looking away. But his policy will have to navigate a legal challenge and a cool reception from some city lawmakers. In emergency rooms, psychiatrists must determine whether such patients need hospitalization, perhaps against their will.

New York City’s mayor on Tuesday said he was directing police and city medics to be more aggressive about getting severely mentally ill people off the streets and subways and into treatment, even if it means involuntarily hospitalizing some people who refuse care.

New York City Mayor Eric Adams announced that authorities would more aggressively intervene to help people in need of treatment. (John Minchillo / Associated Press) © Provided by LA Times New York City Mayor Eric Adams announced that authorities would more aggressively intervene to help people in need of treatment. (John Minchillo / Associated Press)

“These New Yorkers and hundreds of others like them are in urgent need of treatment, yet often refuse it when offered,” Mayor Eric Adams said at a news conference, noting that the pervasive problem of mental illness has long been out in the open.

Donald Trump Jr. harshly mocked John Fetterman's stroke, escalating GOP attacks on his health in the tight PA Senate race

  Donald Trump Jr. harshly mocked John Fetterman's stroke, escalating GOP attacks on his health in the tight PA Senate race Pennsylvania Democratic Senate nominee John Fetterman's health has become a focal point of his race after he suffered a stroke in May. Donald Trump Jr. mocked Fetterman on Sunday, saying he doesn't have "a working brain." 1/16 SLIDES © Mark Makela/Getty Images; Scott Olson/Getty Images; Megan Varner/Getty Images; Bettmann/Contributor/... From Dr. Oz to Hillary Clinton, a tour of 'carpetbagging' politicians past and present The 2022 primaries are rife with accusations of carpetbagging.

“No more walking by or looking away,” the mayor said, calling it “a moral obligation to act."

The mayor’s directive marks the latest attempt to ease a crisis decades in the making. It would give outreach workers, city hospitals and first responders, including police, discretion to involuntarily hospitalize anyone they deem a danger to themselves or unable to care for themselves.

“The very nature of their illnesses keeps them from realizing they need intervention and support. Without that intervention, they remain lost and isolated from society, tormented by delusions and disordered thinking. They cycle in and out of hospitals and jails.”

State law generally limits the ability of authorities to force someone into treatment unless they are a danger to themselves, but Adams said it was a “myth” that the law required a person to be behaving in an “outrageously dangerous” or suicidal way before a police officer or medical worker could take action.

NYC mayor plans to involuntarily hospitalize more mentally ill people

  NYC mayor plans to involuntarily hospitalize more mentally ill people Concerns about crime have put the city's mental health crisis in the spotlight. The city's public advocate, Jumaane Williams, released a report earlier this month saying the city had not undertaken enough efforts to help those suffering from mental illness. But Williams said in a press release about the report, "the answer is not additional policing nor involving law enforcement in the City's mental health response.

As part of its initiative, the city is developing a phone line that would allow police officers to consult with clinicians.

The mayor’s announcement was condemned as wrong-headed by some civil rights groups and advocates for the homeless.

“The mayor is playing fast and loose with the legal rights of New Yorkers and is not dedicating the resources necessary to address the mental health crises that affect our communities," said Donna Lieberman, executive director the New York Civil Liberties Union.

“Forcing people into treatment is a failed strategy for connecting people to long-term treatment and care,” she said.

The Coalition for the Homeless also denounced the mayor's plan, saying the city should focus on expanding access to voluntary psychiatric treatment.

“Mayor Adams continues to get it wrong when it comes to his reliance on ineffective surveillance, policing and involuntary transport and treatment of people with mental illness," said the coalition's executive director, Jacquelyn Simone.

17 Comfortable Henley Shirts That Will Level up Your Fall Wardrobe

  17 Comfortable Henley Shirts That Will Level up Your Fall Wardrobe One of the most flattering shirts your closet is missing.

Other groups welcomed the mayor's overtures even if they remain skeptical about how police would ultimately handle the mentally ill.

“We agree with the spirit of Mayor Adams' address, which, you know, very much centers around confronting this human problem with compassion and sensitivity," said Jeffrey Berman, the an attorney for the mental health unit of the Legal Aid Society.

“We need fixes within the criminal legal system so that those people who do end up arrested can find a way out with treatment and support in the community and a road to real recovery and not jail,” he said.

The Legal Aid Society, along with several community-based defender services, said the mayor was correct in noting “decades of dysfunction” in mental healthcare. They argued state lawmakers “must no longer ‘punt’” to address the crisis and approve legislation that would offer treatment, not jail, for people with mental health issues.

State lawmakers have been considering such legislation that would widen diversion programs for the mentally ill, a move supported by public defender groups.

This Is The Easiest Single-Serving Treat You'll Ever Make

  This Is The Easiest Single-Serving Treat You'll Ever Make With this one-serving variation on the classic recipe, you can enjoy a homemade rice krispie treat anytime. So when I saw that Melissa at No. 2 Pencil, who is one of my personal heroes for adapting all sorts of tasty treats into mug-size or single-serving recipes, had posted about a single-serving rice krispie treat, I dropped everything to make it ASAP. It was everything I hoped it would be, and now I can enjoy a reasonably-sized rice krispie treat any time I like.

Adams has called for an expansion of the use of 1999's “Kendra’s Law,” which allows courts to order defendants with mental illness to complete treatment.

The law was named after Kendra Webdale, who died after being pushed onto the subway tracks by a man with a history of mental illness.

Adams was thrust into the city's mental health crisis when just days after being sworn into office a New York woman was shoved into the path of an oncoming train and was killed, stoking public concerns over random attacks by people struggling with mental illness and homelessness.

Soon after, the mayor announced a subway safety plan and vowed to expand outreach teams. Critics called the plan a crackdown on the mentally ill and the homeless.

The mayor said he has begun deploying teams of clinicians and police officers to patrol the busiest subway stations. The city also was rolling out training to police officers and other first responders to help them provide “compassionate care” in situations that could cause the involuntary removal of a person showing signs of mental illness in public places.

“It is not acceptable for us to see someone who clearly needs help and walk past,” Adams said.

A spokesperson for New York Gov. Kathy Hochul said the city's plan builds on mutual efforts to increase capacity at psychiatric hospitals, as well as expand outreach teams in subways.

This story originally appeared in Los Angeles Times.

Nextdoor releases 'Treat Map' to help users find sweets at Halloween .
The social networking site, which is based in San Francisco, has launched the map for Brits to find treats on Monday evening.Knowing which neighbours have sweets at the ready can be tricky, but thankfully help is here this year.

usr: 0
This is interesting!