•   
  •   
  •   

Health & Fit These Americans are most likely to receive opioid prescriptions

20:25  02 january  2018
20:25  02 january  2018 Source:   marketwatch.com

Cigna, targeting opioid abuse, won't cover OxyContin prescriptions through employer plans

  Cigna, targeting opioid abuse, won't cover OxyContin prescriptions through employer plans In a statement, the insurance giant also announced its intent to reduce opioid use among all of its consumers by 25 percent by 2019. Insurance consumers who have started OxyContin use for cancer or hospice care are exempt from the policy change.To fill the void left by OxyContin’s removal, the insurer has turned to Xtampza ER, which it calls an “oxycodone equivalent with abuse deterrent properties.

About half of adults with a disability receiving Medicare benefits received at least one opioid prescription in a year, and they’re more likely to be from the suburbs, small cities or rural areas. Opioid prescriptions were highest in places with lower median household incomes and higher

Misuse of prescription opioids , CNS depressants, and stimulants is a serious public health problem in the United States. The reasons for the high prevalence of prescription drug misuse vary by age, gender, and other factors, but likely include ease of access.9 The number of prescriptions for some

a close up of a sign: Opioid use has become an epidemic, but there are ways to help slow it down, such as distribution of overdose-reversing drugs. © Provided by Dow Jones & Company, Inc. Opioid use has become an epidemic, but there are ways to help slow it down, such as distribution of overdose-reversing drugs. New data from the CDC shed more light on the nationwide opioid epidemic

About half of adults with a disability receiving Medicare benefits received at least one opioid prescription in a year, and they’re more likely to be from the suburbs, small cities or rural areas.

Opioid prescriptions were highest in places with lower median household incomes and higher unemployment rates and those aged 55 to 64 years old rather than younger Americans, according to research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which analyzed data of almost 3.5 million adults younger than 65 with disabilities and were receiving Medicare Part D benefits for at least a year in 2014.

Walgreens pharmacies to sell opioid overdose medication Narcan

  Walgreens pharmacies to sell opioid overdose medication Narcan Narcan, a nasal spray that can save opioid users from overdosing, will be available without a prescription at over 8,000 Walgreens pharmacies in 45 states.Narcan is an FDA-approved form of naloxone, which works by binding the opioid receptors in the brain and blocking their effects. It restores breathing that has slowed or stopped as a result of overdosing on heroin or a prescription opioid pain medication.

Older Americans Support Limits on Opioid Prescriptions . “While we don't know why these discussions aren 't taking place, the poll results should provide encouragement for physicians and pharmacists to Older people are more likely to be prescribed opioids than any other population.

Americans are in more pain than any other population around the world. At least, that's the conclusion that In most countries, the use of opioid prescriptions is limited to acute hospitalization and trauma, such More than 14,000 of these deaths were linked to prescription opioids (an increase in this

Researchers looked at county-level data, as well as household income, unemployment rate and income inequality. More opioid prescriptions were linked to places with economic hardships, particularly in the South, Southwest and Midwest. The research, which will be published in the January 2018 issue of the peer-reviewed Medical Care journal, found that areas with higher income inequality had lower levels of opioid use.

Almost half of the people analyzed had at least one opioid prescription in 2014, but more than a quarter had received six or more in the same year. Women and white Americans were more likely to be given an opioid prescription, and Native Americans were also more likely to receive one than other racial or ethnic groups.

Non-Opioid Painkillers Might Be Just as Effective as Opioid Drugs, Says Study

  Non-Opioid Painkillers Might Be Just as Effective as Opioid Drugs, Says Study The opioid epidemic has become a national crisis in America, and remarkably, middle-aged women are at particularly high risk of becoming addicted. Some of the stories—like this person’s harrowing experience—are beyond belief. But there’s good news when it comes to battling opioid addiction, according to a new study. Published in JAMA, the new research suggests that non-opioid painkillers for certain types of pain are just as effective as opioid painkillers.

Read more : These Surgeons Cut Opioid Prescriptions Dramatically, With No Increase in Pain. Cancer patients are more likely to overuse opioids . About 6 percent of people who had never used But those who receive curative-intent cancer surgery are almost twice as likely to do so: More than

More than half of all opioid prescriptions in the United States are written for people with anxiety, depression, and other mood disorders, according to a new study that Or physicians might be more sympathetic to patients with preexisting conditions, making them more likely to prescribe opioids .

Here's why bitcoin might be much easier to regulate than cash The SEC and the IRS are looking into ways to track and regulate cryptocurrency trading. Here's what you need to know. 

In the Native American community, Pew Charitable Trusts, a nonprofit public policy organization, cited suicide, mental illness, addiction domestic violence, in part due to what it called “generational trauma” over the loss of ancestral land, racism and poverty. The Native American population is twice as likely than the general population to become addicted to drugs and three times as likely to die from a drug overdose.

Unemployment has a direct link to opioid deaths — as a county unemployment rate increases by one percentage point, the death per 100,000 from opioids rises 3.6% and overdose rises 7%, according to a research report distributed by the National Bureau of Economic Research. While the 1980s crack cocaine epidemic was felt predominantly in black communities, the opioid epidemic has hit white Americans living in rural areas where there’s less access to treatment services and health care, and higher unemployment and poverty.

Study Shows Opioid Prescriptions Come From Doctor Offices, Not Emergency Rooms

  Study Shows Opioid Prescriptions Come From Doctor Offices, Not Emergency Rooms A new study shows where people are getting their opioid prescriptions from.A new study from the University of Southern California showed that opioid prescriptions very rarely come from emergency rooms, but are almost entirely written in doctor’s offices.

Too many Americans are prescribed too many opioids for too long, according to a new report from the This high death rate is driven by prescription opioids as well as illegal opioids , including heroin and Even taking opioids for "just a few days makes a person more likely to take them long term

This is dangerous, they say, because findings also suggest that receiving over 30 pills led to higher rates of additional opioid prescriptions being If extrapolated more broadly to the treatment of other minor injuries, this likely translates to millions of highly addictive and unnecessary prescribed pain

The researchers suspect mental health issues arising in part to economic hardship are a cause for such high usage. Earlier this year, researchers at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and the University of Michigan found that about one-fifth of those with a mental health problem received opioids. While they likely have a physical pain, they may feel that pain more acutely, the researchers said.

Opioids killed 33,000 Americans in 2015 and accounted for 63% of drug overdose deaths that year, according to the Council of Economic Advisers, an agency under the president’s executive office. President Donald Trump has declared it a “public health emergency,” and the CEA report found the economic cost of this crisis in 2015 was $504 billion. The rate of deaths related to opioid use quadrupled since 1999, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Video: Opioid epidemic linked to drop in US average life expectancy (courtesy Fox News)

Controversial supplement kratom is an opioid, FDA says

  Controversial supplement kratom is an opioid, FDA says Kratom, which is made using an Asian plant, isn’t “just a plant,” the FDA says — it’s an opioid. If it looks like an opioid and acts like an opioid, it’s an opioid.That’s the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s reasoning when it comes to kratom, an Asian plant-based dietary supplement that’s been touted as an aid for opioid withdrawal, pain, anxiety and depression. The regulator analyzed kratom at a molecular level and looked at how it may behave inside the body and affect the brain.

Misuse among older adults is expected to double to 2.4% from 1.2% between 2004 and 2020, according to Department of Health and Human Services’ Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). They’re more likely to suffer from chronic pain from work-related injuries or cancer and other illnesses that occur later in life.

The average dose of opioids prescribed in 2016 exceeded manufacturer’s recommended amounts, and older adults are more prone to suffering from side effects, such as complications breathing, confusion and an increased risk of falls. And multiple studies have found them to be highly addictive, hence the nationwide epidemic where opioids ground down and used as street drugs.

Opioids come in numerous forms, such as prescription pills like Vicodin and Oxycontin, or injectable, like for heroin and fentanyl. They can also be taken as a skin patch or lozenge. SAMHSA suggests improving access to treatment and recovery services and the distribution of overdose-reversing drugs such as naloxone, plus strengthening understanding of the epidemic through better public services and conducting more research on pain and addiction and find better methods of pain management.

Gallery: 13 critical questions to ask your doctor before taking pain meds (courtesy Reader's Digest) What triggers my pain symptoms?: If your pain isn't coming from an obvious source—a sore neck from a car accident, say, or broken leg from a skiing snafu—try pinpoint the trouble by keeping a pain journal, recommends Jeremy Allen, MD, medical director for <span href=American Family Care, Birmingham, Alabama, region. Record what you were doing and what was happening around the onset of pain. 'Even things as simple as a shift in your diet, a reduction in the amount or quality of sleep you get, or amount of stress you're under can impact your level of pain,' says Dr. Allen. Don't wait to call a doc if you experience these pain symptoms." src="/upload/images/real/2018/01/02/what-triggers-my-pain-symptoms-if-your-pain-isnt-coming-from-an-obvious-source-a-sore-neck-from-a-ca_261351_.jpg?content=1" /> 13 Critical Questions to Ask Your Doctor Before Taking Pain Meds

Studies link legal marijuana with fewer opioid prescriptions .
Can legalizing marijuana fight the problem of opioid addiction and fatal overdoses? Two new studies in the debate suggest it may. Pot can relieve chronic pain in adults, so it's been proposed as a lower-risk alternative to opioids by advocates for liberalizing marijuana laws. But some research suggests marijuana may encourage opioid use, and so might make the epidemic worse.The new studies don't directly assess the effect of legalizing marijuana on opioid addiction and overdose deaths. Instead, they find evidence that legalization may reduce the prescribing of opioids.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!