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Health & Fit New bipolar, schizophrenia drugs in development

01:07  31 january  2018
01:07  31 january  2018 Source:   nydailynews.com

We're running out of commonly used drugs — and hospitals say it's 'quickly becoming a crisis'

  We're running out of commonly used drugs — and hospitals say it's 'quickly becoming a crisis' Hospitals are facing a shortage on medications that are used every day. The situation is getting worse, the American Hospital Association said.The US has a drug shortage problem.

TOPICS: bipolar development drugs schizophrenia . Within the new examine, printed within the journal Nature, the scientists from the NIH Their new drug for schizophrenia combines Olanzapine (Zyprexa) with Samidorphan. The olanzapine element of the drug function as a D2, D1, and It is.

A new line of anti-psychotic drugs are currently in development and may be released soon thanks to a series of studies funded by the National Institutes of Treatments for bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and other disorders could soon be treated after a recent discovery about a widely-prescribed

A new line of anti-psychotic drugs are currently in development and may be released soon thanks to a series of studies funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Treatments for bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and other disorders could soon be treated after a recent discovery about a widely-prescribed anti-psychotic drug was revealed.

Treatments for bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and other disorders could soon be treated after a recent discovery about a widely-prescribed antipsychotic drug was revealed. © gevende/Getty Images/iStockphoto Treatments for bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and other disorders could soon be treated after a recent discovery about a widely-prescribed antipsychotic drug was revealed.

"For the first time, we can understand precisely how atypical anti-psychotic drugs bind to their primary molecular target in the human brain," National Institutes of Mental Health official Dr. Laurie Nadler said in a release. "This discovery opens the way for the rational design of a new generation of anti-psychotic drugs, hopefully with more desirable effects and fewer side effects."

The FDA is strengthening its warnings about heart attack and stroke risks associated with common pain drugs

  The FDA is strengthening its warnings about heart attack and stroke risks associated with common pain drugs The use of prescription and over-the-counter painkillers like ibuprofen and naproxone is associated with an increased risk of heart attack and stroke. The FDA updated its warnings for the category of drugs, NSAIDs, based on more evidence of the increased risk. Some of the most common painkillers available carry a warning: their use can increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. That warning was strengthened by the FDA on Thursday, after more evidence connected those risks to a category of medication known as non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, also known as NSAIDs.

Drug Approved for Schizophrenia , Bipolar Disorder. Vraylar is an atypical antipsychotic taken once a day. Schizophrenia , a chronic and disabling brain disorder that usually develops in early adulthood, occurs in 1 percent of the general population, according to the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health.

new drugs get approved by the FDA, and a list of possible future medications for schizophrenia , in various stages of clinical testing and development . Depending on the specific reasons for the denial, a developing company may be able to revise the NDA and resubmit the medication for later approval.

The researchers said that current anti-psychotic medications "excel at quelling hallucinations and delusions, yet largely fail to address schizophrenia's debilitating cognitive and social impairments, while increasing risk for movement disorders, weight gain, and other metabolic and cardiovascular side effects."

And the research noted that about one in six American adults reported taking a psychiatric drug in a 2016 study.

In the new study, published in the journal Nature, the scientists from the NIH said that they're hoping this new discovery of how anti-psychotics interact with the D2 brain receptor, specifically, will help them to design a better drug that acts more precisely. Better understanding of how the drug binds to the D2 receptor revealed a "deep pocket" that could be targeted by more selective medications with fewer and less severe side effects.

Angry Avatars Help People Deal With Schizophrenia

  Angry Avatars Help People Deal With Schizophrenia Avatar therapy involves patients creating a digital character that represents the voices they hear, then challenging the avatar’s insults and threats.But a new study has shown that rude virtual avatars that hurl abuse at people with schizophrenia may actually help patients overcome their own voices by confronting the symptom head on.

This drug is being developed to target positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms in patients with both acute and chronic schizophrenia . In addition to the development of new antipsychotics, most pharmaceutical companies are investing money for the development of drugs that reverse cognitive

A new study has identified biomarkers that may help in the development of better treatments for schizophrenia . The findings are published online in JAMA Psychiatry. In the past two decades, the pharmaceutical industry has spent over .5 billion in the ongoing effort to develop better

Slideshow: 20 questions you're too afraid to ask your doctor (but should) (Courtesy: Mom.me) 

Why can't I lose weight?: <p>There are many reasons beyond too many calories and too little <span href=exercise that are making it impossible for you to lose weight. Some of those reasons require medical intervention. If you haven't brought it up with your doctor, be sure to do so. A month before your next checkup, record everything you eat and any physical activity and show it to her, when she brings up diet and exercise.

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20 Questions You're Too Afraid to Ask Your Doctor (But Should)

Study triples number of known depression genes .
A study of nearly half-a-million people has uncovered 30 new genes linked to depression, tripling the number known to play a role in the debilitating disease. The same enlarged basket of depression genes also underpins other psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, a consortium of nearly 250 scientists discovered."This is a game changer," said Patrick Sullivan, director of the Center for Psychiatric Genomics at the University of North Carolina and co-leader of the research. The findings, published in Nature Genetics, provide targets for new drugs and other forms of treatment.

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