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Health & Fit Coconut Oil Sales Plummet as Everyone Realizes What We've Been Saying All Along

19:59  12 march  2018
19:59  12 march  2018 Source:   cookinglight.com

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We ' ve previously covered how coconut oil 's high levels of saturated fat can negatively affect your cholesterol level, and how the American Heart At its peak in 2015, coconut oil was generating over 9 million in sales . RELATED: Here's the Best Ways to Cook With Every Kind of Cooking Oil .

We ' ve previously covered how coconut oil 's high levels of saturated fat can negatively affect your cholesterol level, and how the American Heart At its peak in 2015, coconut oil was generating over 9 million in sales . RELATED: Here's the Best Ways to Cook With Every Kind of Cooking Oil .

a close up of a bottle © Kelsey Hansen

We're not shocked to be reporting that coconut oil—once known as a healthier-for-you Paleo alternative—is now no longer en vogue with home cooks. We've previously covered how coconut oil's high levels of saturated fat can negatively affect your cholesterol level, and how the American Heart Association recommends opting instead for other heart-healthy oils.

Despite widespread claims that coconut oil can boost immunity and help dieters lose weight, industry sales fell flat in 2017, according to data from market research firm SPINS, reports Food Navigator.

Coconut oil exploded in popularity after a string of studies suggested medium-chain fatty acids found in the oil were worth making the switch. By the end of 2013, Google's data reflected the trend was official—search demand for coconut oil more than doubled, and food manufacturers rushed to make coconut oil-infused products, according to the Washington Post. At its peak in 2015, coconut oil was generating over $229 million in sales.

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Since the American Heart Association publicly condemned coconut oil last summer, it's been all downhill for the former superfood.

Since the American Heart Association publicly condemned coconut oil last summer, it's been all downhill for the former superfood. Is Grilling Healthy? We Asked a Nutritionist—Here’s What She Said . Science Confirms What We Knew All Along _ Chocolate Can Reduce Stress.

When the American Heart Association published new reports that coconut oil had too much saturated fat, sales began to slow down. By the end of 2017, retailers sold $52 million less in the coconut oil category—a whopping 24.3 percent drop from 2016, the Post reports.

The trend cycle of healthy, wholesome foods always is changing, and there are a few newcomers we're looking out for. But coconut oil is one health trend we’re ready to wave goodbye to.

Millennials Are Responsible for the End of Iced Tea .
<p>Cold brew and kombucha are taking over</p>If you are between the ages of 18 and 34, pause for a second and consider the last time you bought iced tea. It's been awhile, hasn't it? A recent study by YouGov BrandIndex showed that only 18% of millennials would consider buying an iced tea next time they want a beverage—that's down five points from the same study in January of 2016.

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