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Health & Fit A compound in beets could slow Alzheimer's effects

21:32  21 march  2018
21:32  21 march  2018 Source:   nydailynews.com

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Betanin, the compound that gives beets their distinctive red color could slow down the effects of Alzheimer ' s disease — the world's leading type of dementia. Misfolded protein accumulation in the brain — one of the processes associated with Alzheimer ' s diseases — could be slowed with the

You can now add one more benefit to eating beets – that is, slowing down the progress of Alzheimer ' s disease. According to a study, the extracts of beets contain a If this new research is to be believed, phytochemicals found in beets might help protect the brain from copper toxicity.

Betanin, the compound that gives beets their distinctive red color could slow down the effects of Alzheimer's disease — the world's leading type of dementia.

Misfolded protein accumulation in the brain — one of the processes associated with Alzheimer's diseases — could be slowed with the help of the vegetable and lead to the development of a drug aimed at alleviating some of the illness' long-term, debilitating effects, according to a new study.

A compound in beets that gives the vegetable its bright coloring could have Alzheimer’s-fighting properties. © sagarmanis/Getty Images/iStockphoto A compound in beets that gives the vegetable its bright coloring could have Alzheimer’s-fighting properties.

The compound "shows some promise as an inhibitor of certain chemical reactions in the brain that are involved in the progression of Alzheimer's disease," co-author Li-June Ming said in the study published by the American Chemical Society. "This is just a first step, but we hope that our findings will encourage other scientists to look for structures similar to betanin that could be used to synthesize drugs that could make life a bit easier for those who suffer from this disease."

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A compound in beets that gives the vegetable its distinctive red color could help slow the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the brain, a process associated with Alzheimer ' s disease. More than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer ' s disease, according to the National Institute on Aging.

Betanin, a compound found in beets , shows promise in slowing down the progression of Alzheimer ’ s disease. This is not the first time beets were noted for their effect on brain health. A 2017 study revealed that older individuals who drank beetroot juice before exercising experienced increased brain

Alzheimer's affects one in 10 Americans over the age of 65 and one in three over 85 — more than five million people. The cause of the disease is still mostly unknown, but scientists suspect that a big contributor is beta-amyloid — a peptide that builds up in the brain and disrupts neuron communication, eventually killing them off. When beta-amyloids attach themselves to metals in the brain like copper or iron, they oxidize, misfold and accumulate.

In the study, the researchers saw that introducing betanin reduced oxidation by 90% and, in effect, at least partly suppressed misfolding.

"We can't say that betanin stops the misfolding completely, but we can say that it reduces oxidation," co-author Darrell Cole Cerrato said. "Less oxidation could prevent misfolding to a certain degree, perhaps even to the point that it slows the aggregation of beta-amyloid peptides, which is believed to be the ultimate cause of Alzheimer's."

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