•   
  •   
  •   

Health & Fit A compound in beets could slow Alzheimer's effects

21:32  21 march  2018
21:32  21 march  2018 Source:   nydailynews.com

Skin Cancer Associated With Reduced Alzheimer's Risk

  Skin Cancer Associated With Reduced Alzheimer's Risk It's not yet clear why skin cancer survivors had a dramatically reduced risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.Skin cancer may reduce a patient’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease by as much as 92 percent, a new study revealed. Although it’s not clear why, there appears to be an association between lower Alzheimer’s disease risk in patients with certain skin cancers, there are likely both neurologic and biologic factors at play.

Betanin, the compound that gives beets their distinctive red color could slow down the effects of Alzheimer ' s disease — the world's leading type of dementia. Misfolded protein accumulation in the brain — one of the processes associated with Alzheimer ' s diseases — could be slowed with the

Betanin, the compound that gives beets their distinctive red color could slow down the effects of Alzheimer ' s disease — the world's leading type of dementia.

Betanin, the compound that gives beets their distinctive red color could slow down the effects of Alzheimer's disease — the world's leading type of dementia.

Misfolded protein accumulation in the brain — one of the processes associated with Alzheimer's diseases — could be slowed with the help of the vegetable and lead to the development of a drug aimed at alleviating some of the illness' long-term, debilitating effects, according to a new study.

A compound in beets that gives the vegetable its bright coloring could have Alzheimer’s-fighting properties. © sagarmanis/Getty Images/iStockphoto A compound in beets that gives the vegetable its bright coloring could have Alzheimer’s-fighting properties.

The compound "shows some promise as an inhibitor of certain chemical reactions in the brain that are involved in the progression of Alzheimer's disease," co-author Li-June Ming said in the study published by the American Chemical Society. "This is just a first step, but we hope that our findings will encourage other scientists to look for structures similar to betanin that could be used to synthesize drugs that could make life a bit easier for those who suffer from this disease."

Alzheimer's epidemic worsens in U.S.

  Alzheimer's epidemic worsens in U.S. Daughters, other relatives carry most of the responsibility Alzheimer's disease just keeps getting worse in the U.S. The latest report on the most common cause of dementia shows that 5.7 million Americans have the disease and it's costing us $277 billion a year.That doesn't include the unpaid time and effort of the people, mostly women, who are caring for spouses, parents, siblings, and friends with dementia, the annual report from the Alzheimer's Association shows."In 2017, 16 million Americans provided an estimated 18.

Betanin, the compound that gives beets their distinctive red color could slow down the effects of Alzheimer ' s disease — the world's leading type of dementia. Misfolded protein accumulation in the brain — one of the processes associated with Alzheimer ' s diseases — could be slowed with the

Betanin, the compound that gives beets their distinctive red color could slow down the effects of Alzheimer ’ s disease — the world’s leading type of dementia. In the study, the researchers saw that introducing betanin reduced oxidation by 90% and, in effect , at least partly suppressed misfolding.

Alzheimer's affects one in 10 Americans over the age of 65 and one in three over 85 — more than five million people. The cause of the disease is still mostly unknown, but scientists suspect that a big contributor is beta-amyloid — a peptide that builds up in the brain and disrupts neuron communication, eventually killing them off. When beta-amyloids attach themselves to metals in the brain like copper or iron, they oxidize, misfold and accumulate.

In the study, the researchers saw that introducing betanin reduced oxidation by 90% and, in effect, at least partly suppressed misfolding.

"We can't say that betanin stops the misfolding completely, but we can say that it reduces oxidation," co-author Darrell Cole Cerrato said. "Less oxidation could prevent misfolding to a certain degree, perhaps even to the point that it slows the aggregation of beta-amyloid peptides, which is believed to be the ultimate cause of Alzheimer's."

Slideshow: 13 symptoms of serious health matters (Courtesy: Mom.me)

13 Symptoms of Serious Health Matters 13 Symptoms of Serious Health Matters

10 years of following an Alzheimer's patient .
60 Minutes shows how the disease has changed the world of Carol Daly, a woman diagnosed with Alzheimer's, and her caregiver husband, Mike As baby boomers move into old age and live longer, the potential number of Alzheimer's sufferers in the U.S. may reach record levels. CBS News Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook follows an Alzheimer's patient and her caregiver husband for 10 years in an unprecedented report that shows future sufferers and their caregivers what they may face. "For Better or for Worse" will be broadcast on 60 Minutes on Sunday, April 22 at 7:00 p.m. ET/PT on CBS.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!