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Health & Fit Alzheimer's epidemic worsens in U.S.

07:06  23 march  2018
07:06  23 march  2018 Source:   nbcnews.com

This May Be The 1st New Alzheimer's Drug In Years

  This May Be The 1st New Alzheimer's Drug In Years A drug originally designed to treat diabetes has reversed Alzheimer's disease symptoms in lab mice.In the study, published online this week in Brain Research, scientists from Lancaster University in England used lab mice to test how effective a diabetes drug known as a triple receptor was in treating Alzheimer’s disease. The mice in the study were specifically created to express certain genes associated with Alzheimer's disease in humans. The researchers waited for the mice to age before giving them the drug, therefore giving their disease some time to develop and damage the animal’s brain.

Alzheimer ' s disease affects more than an estimated 5 million people in the United States. The disease is known to impair memory, but it' s more than simple forgetfulness. A neurodegenerative condition, Alzheimer ' s disease causes a person' s memory, ability to think, and personality to degrade over time.

Alzheimer ’ s disease affects more than an estimated 5 million people in the United States. As the British neuroscientist Joseph Jebelli put it on NPR, it’ s perfectly normal in the process of aging to become more forgetful—for instance, to forget where you put your keys. A neurodegenerative condition.

Image: A doctor assists an elderly woman along a hospital corridorThe latest report on the most common cause of dementia, Alzheimer's, shows that 5.7 million Americans have the disease and it's costing us $277 billion a year. © Provided by NBCU News Group, a division of NBCUniversal Media LLC Image: A doctor assists an elderly woman along a hospital corridorThe latest report on the most common cause of dementia, Alzheimer's, shows that 5.7 million Americans have the disease and it's costing us $277 billion a year. Daughters, other relatives carry most of the responsibility

Alzheimer's disease just keeps getting worse in the U.S. The latest report on the most common cause of dementia shows that 5.7 million Americans have the disease and it's costing us $277 billion a year.

That doesn't include the unpaid time and effort of the people, mostly women, who are caring for spouses, parents, siblings, and friends with dementia, the annual report from the Alzheimer's Association shows.

Potential blood test for Alzheimer's shows early promise

  Potential blood test for Alzheimer's shows early promise Researchers in Japan and Australia say they have made important progress in developing a blood test that could in future help doctors detect who might go on to get Alzheimer's disease.In a study published online January 31 in Nature, the scientists said the test, which can detect a toxic protein known as amyloid beta, linked to Alzheimer's, was more than 90 percent accurate in research involving around 370 people.

Alzheimer ' s disease doesn't just steal memories. It takes lives. The disease is now the sixth leading cause of death in the U . S ., and figures released One reason Alzheimer ' s deaths are going up is that deaths from other causes, like heart disease and prostate cancer, are going down, Carrillo says.

Alzheimer ’ s disease just keeps getting worse in the U . S . The latest report on the most common cause of dementia shows that 5.7 million While it may sound counterintuitive, diagnosing someone before they progress from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer ’ s can end up costing less.

"In 2017, 16 million Americans provided an estimated 18.4 billion hours of unpaid care in the form of physical, emotional and financial support - a contribution to the nation valued at $232.1 billion," the Association says.

"The difficulties associated with providing this level of care are estimated to have resulted in $11.4 billion in additional healthcare costs for Alzheimer's and other dementia caregivers in 2017."

It is very expensive to take care of someone with Alzheimer's disease. The Association estimates that it costs $341,000 on average for the health needs of someone with the disease from diagnosis to death. Families pay 70 percent of this out of pocket.

Two-thirds of those doing the work are women, the report finds, and 1/3 are daughters. Overall, 83 percent of all the care given to dementia patients is provided by relatives, friends or other unpaid people.

Baby Dolls Help People With Alzheimer's

  Baby Dolls Help People With Alzheimer's This is truly incredible.

As the Alzheimer ' s Association International Conference kicks off Saturday in Copenhagen, Denmark, one thing is clear: There is a tremendous public And while U . S . federal funding for Alzheimer ' s research got a 2 million boost this year, the National Institutes of Health still allocates about 0

Someone develops Alzheimer ’ s disease every 68 seconds. Today, 5 million people in the U . S . have Alzheimer ’ s disease. No wonder this incurable disease is termed an ‘ epidemic ’ or the “silver tsunami.” But Alzheimer ’ s isn’t just about the person who has it.

It's hard work — more than 20 hours a week on average — and it can take a toll on the health of the caregiver. The report notes that Alzheimer's caregivers have higher risk factors for heart disease and depression.

But earlier diagnosis can save time and money, the report says. While it may sound counterintuitive, diagnosing someone before they progress from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's can end up costing less.

"While current therapies do not prevent, halt or reverse Alzheimer's disease, they can temporarily improve and prolong cognitive function in many individuals with Alzheimer's dementia," the report reads.

"An early diagnosis also enables potential safety issues, such as problems with driving or wandering, to be addressed ahead of time."

Not only can patients plan ahead while they still can, they can get and keep chronic medical conditions under control. Controlling heart disease, diabetes and other conditions early saves money in the long run.

Plus, starting to exercise, eating healthily and quitting smoking can slow progression of the disease.

"The sooner the diagnosis occurs, the sooner these costs can be managed and savings can begin," said the Alzheimer Association's Keith Fargo.

And it may not be Alzheimer's. "When further testing shows reversible or treatable causes (for example, depression, obstructive sleep apnea or vitamin B12 deficiency) rather than Alzheimer's disease, early diagnosis can lead to treatment and improvement of cognition and quality of life," the report reads.

UK, US drugmakers scrap 'futile' Alzheimer's treatment trial .
British and American pharmaceutical giants AstraZeneca and Eli Lilly on Tuesday said they were ending a large clinical trial of a treatment for Alzheimer's that they had been developing jointly. The decision to scrap the phase III clinical trial comes as a major setback in the race to find a cure for the disease, which is the most common form of dementia and affects millions of people around the world.With a clinical trial failure rate of over 99 percent, there is still no licenced drug that slows Alzheimer's progression or cures it.

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