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Health & Fit Loneliness Can Actually Hurt Your Heart. Here's Why

02:46  27 march  2018
02:46  27 march  2018 Source:   time.com

Leaving the house linked to longevity in older adults

  Leaving the house linked to longevity in older adults Researchers learned that people who left the house frequently at any of the ages examined were significantly more likely to live to the next age group.(Reuters Health) – For older people, getting out of the house regularly may contribute to a longer life - and the effect is independent of medical problems or mobility issues, according to new research from Israel.

Here ' s Why . Getty Images. Suspecting that the effects of social isolation and loneliness might be compounded by other traits common among antisocial folks, the researchers set out to determine exactly how much risk could be blamed on social causes — an extra step few other studies have taken.

Social isolation and loneliness raise the risk for heart problems.

a close up of a mans face with fence in the background © Getty Images Research has shown, again and again, that emotional and physical health are inextricably linked. There are significant health benefits associated with love and friendship, supportive marriages and feelings of gratitude, for example.

And there are significant health risks linked to the opposite. A new study, published Monday in the journal Heart, looked at social isolation (being separated from other people) and loneliness (being cut off from social connection, and being unhappy about it).

Researchers found that people who are socially isolated or lonely are more likely to have a heart attack or stroke, compared to people with strong personal networks. Social isolation, but not loneliness, also seems to increase the risk of death among people with a history of heart disease, the study says. The findings support several other studies that have come to similar conclusions.

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Patients with heart failure who experienced loneliness and social isolation were actually more likely to die than their peers who had company. Loneliness and heartbreak are no doubt intertwined — but according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, being lonely

“Having social support from significant others or from persons who are in a similar situation is good for your health, and socially isolated or lonely individuals might not have possibilities for this kind of support,” said first author Christian Hakulinen, a professor of psychology and logopedics at the University of Helsinki in Finland, in an email to TIME.

However, there was one surprise. Suspecting that the effects of social isolation and loneliness might be compounded by other traits common among antisocial folks, the researchers set out to determine exactly how much risk could be blamed on social causes — an extra step few other studies have taken.

To do so, they surveyed almost 480,000 adults in the UK about their social lives, loneliness, medical histories and lifestyle habits. They also measured health metrics including height, weight, body mass index and grip strength. Participants were then tracked for about seven years.

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Researchers reported in the journal Heart this week that poor social relationships could actually hurt your heart . The magnitude of the effect of loneliness appeared to be similar to that of other stressors, such as anxiety and job strain, and appeared to be similar for both men and women.

Social isolation and loneliness raise the risk for heart problems Loneliness Can Actually Hurt Your Heart . Yup, Seasonal Allergies Can Give You a Sore Throat— Here ' s How to Find Relief — Prevention.

Isolation and loneliness seemed to significantly raise a person’s risk of cardiovascular problems, compared to more social folks. Isolation was associated with a 43% higher risk of first-time heart attack and a 39% higher risk of first-time stroke. Loneliness, meanwhile, was associated with a 49% higher risk of first-time heart attack and a 36% higher risk of first-time stroke.

After accounting for biological, health and socioeconomic factors, however, the numbers looked quite different: Isolation only seemed to bump the risk of heart attack and stroke by 7% and 6%, respectively, while loneliness raised heart attack and stroke risk by 6% and 4%.

“This indicates that most of the excess risk was attributable to known risk factors such as obesity, smoking, low education and pre-existing chronic illness,” Hakulinen says.

In the end, among people with preexisting heart issues, only the link between social isolation and mortality remained statistically significant after adjusting for other factors. Social isolation seemed to bump a person’s risk of death by 25% among those with a history of heart attack, and by 32% for those with a history of stroke. This suggests that while an empty social life may not cause heart problems, it could seriously affect your ability to recover from them, Hakulinen says.

Feeling lonely? How to stop social media from making you feel isolated

  Feeling lonely? How to stop social media from making you feel isolated "We are facing a loneliness epidemic," experts say. Lacking social connections may be as damaging to a person's health as smoking 15 cigarettes a day. It's lonely out there, even as gadgets connect more people than ever.Texts, tweets, posts and photos fly around the world, yet their senders often find there's something missing from their lives.Dr. Brian Primack is the lead author of a recent study that discovered the more time young adults use social media, the more likely they are to feel socially isolated — lacking fulfilling relationships and a sense of belonging.

Loneliness can actually hurt your heart . Here ' s why http://ti.me/2IKL98k #EndLoneliness # Loneliness .

Home » Blog » News » Loneliness Can Actually Hurt Your Heart . Here s Why . Posted on March 26, 2018 by RSS.

“In theory, it might be that individuals who are feeling lonely have at least some social networks that activate after they get sick, but persons who are socially isolated don’t have these kind of social networks,” Hakulinen says, though he cautions that the study did not prove cause-and-effect.

Still, the findings suggest that maintaining personal relationships is more than just fulfilling – it could be lifesaving.

“It would be important to maintain existing relationships by meeting family members or friends face-to-face,” Hakulinen says. “Finding people with common interests — for example by joining a hobby [or] club — is likely a good way to make new social connections.”

Gallery: 70 genius tricks to get instantly happy (courtesy Best Life) 70 Genius Tricks to Get Instantly Happy: <p>You know those moods where you’re feeling down and it doesn’t seem like anything is going to pick you back up again? We’ve all been there. But the next time you’re in need of a boost, there are plenty of easy tricks you can use to make yourself happy again.</p><p>Whether it’s spending time with your dog, volunteering, or even filling your home with plants, these science-backed ways of improving your mood will have you feeling like yourself again in no time. (Also, there’s chocolate involved… and if science says you should eat chocolate to feel better, you listen.) And for more great life hacks, here are<span href= 13 Tricks for an Instant Energy Boost.

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Millennials are on track to have worse health in middle age than their parents, according to a new report .
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