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Health & Fit A Pediatric Food Allergist Explains Nut Allergies in a Way That'll Make New Parents Sigh With Relief

22:05  06 may  2018
22:05  06 may  2018 Source:   popsugar.com

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We spoke with David Stukus, MD, pediatric allergist at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Ohio, to help put parents ' There is a small part of the population, however, who are actually more likely to have food allergies than others. And believe it or not, your child's eczema may have something to do with it.

A food allergy reaction occurs when your immune system overreacts to a food or a substance in a food , identifying it as a danger and triggering a Avoiding an allergen is easier said than done. While labeling has helped make this process a bit easier, some foods are so common that avoiding them is

How Common Are Food Allergies? © U.S. Department of Agriculture How Common Are Food Allergies?

While some people could happily survive only on peanut butter, others can go straight into anaphylactic shock if the nuts are in the same room as them. So as parents, figuring out if your baby has nut allergies can be anxiety-inducing. We spoke with David Stukus, MD, pediatric allergist at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Ohio, to help put parents' minds at ease when it comes to introducing peanut products to their kiddos.

"The vast majority of parents do not need to worry about anything prior to feeding their infant peanut products or any other allergenic foods for the first time," he told POPSUGAR. "Food allergies are rare, only affecting approximately five percent of children, thus most kids will never experience an allergic reaction." 

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A Pediatric Food Allergist Explains Nut Allergies in a Way That ' ll Make New Parents Sigh With Relief . Dr. Purvi Parikh, an allergist and immunologist with Allergy & Asthma Network, agrees that parents should consult a certified allergist to monitor their children's allergies .

Foods that most often cause an allergic response in babies include cow's milk, eggs, nuts If your breastfed baby is diagnosed with an allergy , you' ll have to steer clear of her trigger foods . Babies With Food Allergies . this link is to an external site that may or may not meet accessibility guidelines.

"There is no reason to treat the introduction of foods like a medical procedure."

There is a small part of the population, however, who are actually more likely to have food allergies than others. And believe it or not, your child's eczema may have something to do with it.

"Infants with severe eczema that persists despite the daily use of skin moisturizers and requires treatment with prescription-strength topical steroids are at highest risk to develop food allergies. Parents of these children should discuss when and how to introduce peanuts with their pediatrician before giving at home."

If your kiddo is eczema-free, Dr. Stukus encourages parents to have a little fun with introducing your baby to nuts.

"For everyone else, there is no reason to treat the introduction of foods like a medical procedure; parents can start introducing age-appropriate peanut products (never whole or partial peanuts due to choking risk) when the baby has shown interest and ability to eat other solids."

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In a food allergy , the immune system reacts to a harmless food as if it were a threat and creates Dr. Greer suggests that parents not use formulas made from more common allergy triggers like cow's Talk to your pediatrician and visit an allergist . Although it may be tempting, don't diagnose your

If your child has a nut allergy , make sure to be extra-vigilant with these dining options. I’m a pediatric sleep specialist who has seen it all, and I’m here to tell you Although the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act mandates that peanuts and tree nuts (along with six other

And while there have some alternate ideas to introducing little ones to peanut products - like rubbing peanut butter on baby's leg rather than letting them ingest it, for example - Dr. Stukus says that may not be effective.

"If parents are anxious about feeding their kids peanuts for whatever reason, putting peanut butter on a child's leg at first may provide reassurance. However, absence of symptoms on the skin does not rule out an allergy after ingestion," he said, adding that, "In addition, some kids will have rashes from skin contact due to irritation but are able to eat peanuts just fine; these kids run the risk of avoiding peanuts unnecessarily if this occurs."

Dr. Stukus wants parents to know that the chances of kids having peanut allergies are exceedingly rare and explained that parents can be cautiously optimistic.

"There is a lot of misinformation and unnecessary fear surrounding peanuts, but peanut allergies only affect about one percent of all children. Even for those children who develop peanut allergies, they rarely if ever have a severe or life-threatening reaction with the first exposure," he explained. "We have excellent evidence that the earlier infants start eating age-appropriate peanut products regularly, the better chance they have of never developing an allergy."

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Patients and parents of food allergic children often experience anxiety or stress over potential exposure to food allergens . Doctor Weinstein is a board certified allergy specialist and has been providing quality allergy treatment to the people of Northern New Jersey for over 10 years, and looks

Allergies , in a nutshell. Allergies and the immune system. When someone is allergic to nuts , their immune system mistakenly identifies nuts as a harmful substance. Many food allergies cause digestive problems as the allergenic proteins make their way through the stomach and intestines.

The guidelines outlined by the American Academy of Pediatrics also recommend introducing peanut products to your child early on, even if your little one has eczema. They suggest letting kids who fall into this category try peanuts between 4 and 6 months old, as long as allergy testing has been completed by a pediatrician. 

For moms and dads who are still treading lightly, Dr. Stukus suggests taking a slow and steady approach.

"If parents are worried, they can always proceed slowly by allowing their infant to have a few small bites, then wait 10 to 15 minutes to see if any rashes or other symptoms develop before feeding more. They can also try age-appropriate options like peanut butter thinned with water, peanut flour, or powder mixed into a pureed food or cereal."

Related video: Researchers Compile Guide For Nut Allergies (Provided by Wochit News)

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