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Health & Fit Enjoy your salad. It's safe to eat romaine lettuce again, CDC says

16:36  17 may  2018
16:36  17 may  2018 Source:   today.com

More E. Coli Infections Tied to Romaine Lettuce Have Been Reported, CDC Says

  More E. Coli Infections Tied to Romaine Lettuce Have Been Reported, CDC Says Cases are piling up in an E. coli outbreak likely tied to chopped romaine lettuce, according to an update issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Eighteen people from five states have been added to the CDC’s investigation since the agency first alerted the public to the E. coli outbreak on Friday, bringing the total to 53 people sickened in 16 states. The E. coli outbreak has led to 31 hospitalizations, according to the CDC, but no deaths have been reported.

Great News: It ' s Now Safe to Eat Romaine Lettuce Again . The CDC and FDA have lifted their bans on romaine lettuce more than a month after E. coli sickened 175 people across the nation.

The E. coli outbreak that made 172 people sick in 32 states is most likely over, the CDC says . “ It is unlikely that any romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region is still available in stores or restaurants due to its 21-day shelf life.” Learn One Small Thing to be fit: Fiery chicken salad .

Grilled lettuceGrilled lettuce, romaine © Shutterstock Grilled lettuceGrilled lettuce, romaine The E. coli outbreak that made 172 people sick in 32 states is most likely over, the CDC says

It's finally safe to eat romaine lettuce again.

Any romaine lettuce being sold now is almost certainly not from the Yuma, Arizona region and so unlikely to carry the E. coli bacteria that's been making people sick, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

The outbreak has made 172 people sick in 32 states, and one person has died, the CDC said. More cases may get reported, but the shelf-life of romaine lettuce is not long and no more is being harvested from the affected area.

UPDATE: National E. coli Outbreak Is Worsening, a Blanket Ban On Romaine Lettuce Is Recommended

  UPDATE: National E. coli Outbreak Is Worsening, a Blanket Ban On Romaine Lettuce Is Recommended The CDC and FDA are working together to pinpoint the source of infection in Yuma, Arizona, after a string of cases in New Jersey where people ate salads at Panera Bread.UPDATE: The national recall of romaine lettuce has worsened since the FDA and CDC first traced an E.coli outbreak back to Arizona, and now both organizations are recommending a blanket ban on all romaine lettuce.

Related. Don't eat romaine , CDC says . “ It is unlikely that any romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region is still available in stores or restaurants due to its 21-day shelf life.”

The CDC says it ' s unlikely any romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona, growing region is still in stores or restaurants. Learn more about this story at

All the cases had been linked to lettuce that came from the Yuma, Arizona growing region.

"CDC is updating its advice to consumers. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the last shipments of romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region were harvested on April 16, 2018 and the harvest season is over," the CDC said.

"It is unlikely that any romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region is still available in stores or restaurants due to its 21-day shelf life."

The CDC said 20 people had developed a severe consequence of E. coli infection called hemolytic uremic syndrome. And 75 people have been sick enough to need hospitalization.

"It takes two to three weeks between when a person becomes ill with E. coli and when the illness is reported to CDC. The most recent illnesses reported to CDC started when romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region was likely still available in stores, restaurants, and in peoples' homes," the CDC said.

It's the worst outbreak of E. coli since 2006 when illnesses traced to spinach killed three and sickened more than 270.

The CDC estimates that foodborne illnesses affect 47.8 million people in the U.S. every year, putting 127,000 into the hospital and killing more than 3,000.

Five now dead in romaine E. coli outbreak .
FDA and CDC struggling to find the source of the infection Four more people have died of E. coli infections spread by romaine lettuce and 25 more illnesses have been reported, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday.The outbreak is over and romaine lettuce is no longer on the warning list, but reports of cases in three more states have come in, the CDC said.A total of five people have died and 197 reported sick in the outbreak, the largest E. coli outbreak in the U.S. in more than a decade, the CDC said.

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