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Health & Fit France to outlaw controversial food additive this year

17:01  21 may  2018
17:01  21 may  2018 Source:   msn.com

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France will forbid the use of a widely used food additive by the end of this year , after studies pointed to potential health risks for consumers, a government official told French daily Le Parisien on Friday. Brune Poirson, a junior minister in environmental ministry, said the move would remove titanium.

France will forbid the use of a widely used food additive by the end of this year , after studies pointed to potential health risks for consumers, a government official The additive also inhibited the immune systems of the rats and "accelerated" the growth of lesions induced for the experiment, according to

France is to ban an additive, used mainly as a whitening and brightening agent in candies, chewing gum, white sauces and cake icing. © Provided by AFPRelaxNews France is to ban an additive, used mainly as a whitening and brightening agent in candies, chewing gum, white sauces and cake icing. France will forbid the use of a widely used food additive by the end of this year, after studies pointed to potential health risks for consumers, a government official told French daily Le Parisien on Friday.

Brune Poirson, a junior minister in environmental ministry, said the move would remove titanium dioxide nanoparticles from candy, prepared meals and other food products.

"France has already asked the European Commission to take similar measures," Poirson told Le Parisien.

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]Basically, food additives are substances that are added to foods to alter them in some way. Usually, they’re added to processed and ultra processed foods . Worst of all, many controversial food additives are harmful chemicals. (Some of which are used in other non- food products, like plastics

Food additives are substances added to food to preserve flavor or enhance its taste, appearance, or other qualities. Some additives have been used for centuries; for example, preserving food by pickling (with vinegar), salting, as with bacon, preserving sweets or using sulfur dioxide as with wines.

The additive, used mainly as a whitening and brightening agent in candies, chewing gum, white sauces and cake icing, is known as the artificial colour E171 on food labels.

It is also used in sunscreens because of the molecule's ability to reflect ultra-violet rays.

But critics say it offers no nutritional value nor extended shelf life, and could pose a risk to humans since the minuscule particles may be able to pass through protective walls of organs such as the liver, lungs or intestines.

France ordered an inquiry last year after scientists reported that titanium dioxide could cause precancerous lesions in rats.

Researchers from France and Luxembourg found a 40 percent increase in precancerous growths in lab rats who had the molecule added to their drinking water for 100 days.

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France wastes 7m tonnes of food annually. Supermarket chain Carrefour, above, agreed the law would help increase food donations. In recent years , growing numbers of families, students, unemployed and homeless people in France have been foraging in supermarket bins at night to feed themselves.

Supermarkets in France that throw away edible food are breaking the law . Giving left over food to charities, once an act of good will, is now a requirement under a Almost two years on, Bailet tells NPR the new law increased the amount of donations, and the quality of donated food also improved.

The additive also inhibited the immune systems of the rats and "accelerated" the growth of lesions induced for the experiment, according to France's INRA agricultural research institute, which took part in the study.

The study's authors said that titanium dioxide was approved in the US in 1966 at levels of no more than one percent of a food product's weight, but that there were no limits regulating daily intake in Europe.

Acting for the Environment, a French association, welcomed the decision while also urging the government to ban E171 from cosmetics and medicines, citing a risk it could be absorbed through the skin.

Many French candy makers have already stopped using the food colorant ahead of expected restrictions on its use.

Carambar and Co. said in February that it had removed E171 from its Malabar chewing gums -- beloved by generations of French children -- since late last year.

The company was not among nine food and cosmetic groups targeted in a lawsuit by the French consumer group UFC-Que Choisir in January, accusing them of not disclosing the presence of nanoparticles on labels.

Just Because Something Is Low-Carb or Gluten-Free Doesn't Mean It's Healthy .
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