Health & Fit: Colon cancer screening should start at 45 - - PressFrom - US
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Health & Fit Colon cancer screening should start at 45

17:56  30 may  2018
17:56  30 may  2018 Source:   nbcnews.com

Why the Jonas Brothers Will All Have Early Screening for Colorectal Cancer

  Why the Jonas Brothers Will All Have Early Screening for Colorectal Cancer Although most colorectal cancers occur in people with no family history of the disease, having an affected family member does increase your risk for developing it.Nearly one year ago, Kevin Jonas Sr. was diagnosed with stage II colon cancer following his first colonoscopy at age 52, according to People. He had surgery to have the mass removed and six months of preventive chemotherapy. And in December, doctors told the father of four that he was officially in remission. Now, he’s facing his next big battle: making sure his famous sons get early screening for the disease.

Screening for colorectal cancer should start 5 years younger, at age 45 , the American Cancer Society recommends in new colon cancer guidelines. Current guidelines call for people to start getting some kind of cancer screening at age 50. After consulting with experts on just how early to

The American Cancer Society recommends new colon cancer guidelines. Americans should start screening for colorectal cancer at age 45 . “We're actually seeing colorectal cancer developing in people in their teens, which is something that was extraordinarily rare in the past, and it's all too

Image: Lari JohnstonLari Johnston, 50, was diagnosed with colorectal cancer at age 47. The American Cancer Society says people should start getting colon cancer screening at age 45 instead of age 50. © Provided by NBCU News Group, a division of NBCUniversal Media LLC Image: Lari JohnstonLari Johnston, 50, was diagnosed with colorectal cancer at age 47. The American Cancer Society says people should start getting colon cancer screening at age 45 instead of age 50. People should start getting screened for colon cancer at age 45 instead of at 50, the American Cancer Society said Wednesday.

The group lowered its guidelines after research clearly showed people are getting colon cancer at younger and younger ages in the U.S.

It's not clear why, but the trend is so clear that the group wants people to start checking sooner.

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In contrast, colon cancer screening , by definition, is done when people are symptom-free. The point is to catch cancer early or, better yet, abnormal growths that can be removed before they have a chance to become cancerous . "These findings aren't going to change what we recommend as far as

The American Cancer Society has updated its colon and rectal cancer screening guidelines to recommend that adults get screened starting at age 45 , instead of 50.

"People born in the 80s and 90s are at double the risk for developing cancer of the colon and four times the risk for developing cancer of the rectum compared to people born decades earlier like the 40s and 50s," said Dr. Richard Wender, chief cancer control officer for the American Cancer Society.

"We're actually seeing colorectal cancer developing in people in their teens, which is something that was extraordinarily rare in the past, and it's all too common today," Wender told NBC News.

One of those younger colorectal cancer patients is Lari Johnston of Chicago, who's now 50. She was diagnosed with colorectal cancer when she was just 47. It had already spread — something common in younger patients who have little reason to suspect they may have cancer.

Congress must invest in colon cancer prevention

  Congress must invest in colon cancer prevention The United States can and must improve the mortality rate of colorectal cancer. Robust federal research funding is essential to preventing and treating the disease. Colorectal cancer is America's silent killer. The disease often has no warning signs or symptoms, and it affects more than 140,000 men and women each year. Despite being largely preventable with screening and treatable if caught early, more than 50,000 people in the United States die from colorectal cancer each year.The United States can and must improve the mortality rate of colorectal cancer.

Colon cancer screening should start younger, American Cancer Society says. Some experts have worried about pre-50 risks of colon cancer in some racial and ethnic groups, and at least one specialty society for gastroenterologists has urged screening of black adults starting at age 45 .

The lower age puts the American Cancer Society out of sync with recommendations from an influential government advisory group, which says screenings should start at New American Cancer Society guidelines say most U.S. adults should begin getting screened for colon cancer when they turn 45 .

Hers was caught by a gynecologist who recommended fecal tests for all her patients over 40.

"I owe my life right now to my gynecologist for giving me that exam," Johnston told NBC News.

"If not for that fecal occult test, I think I would be dead by now, because by the time I would have been symptomatic it would have spread too far."

Even so, it was a terrifying diagnosis. "I feared I wouldn't even see my kids graduate from high school," she said.

"They don't give me a prognosis and I don't want one. It's stage 4. It's a terminal illness, but who knows what's around the corner."

Image: Lari JohnstonLari Johnston, 50, was diagnosed with colorectal cancer at age 47. The American Cancer Society says people should start getting colon cancer screening at age 45 instead of age 50. © Provided by NBCU News Group, a division of NBCUniversal Media LLC Image: Lari JohnstonLari Johnston, 50, was diagnosed with colorectal cancer at age 47. The American Cancer Society says people should start getting colon cancer screening at age 45 instead of age 50. Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in Americans, according to the American Cancer Society. Colon cancer will be diagnosed in more than 95,000 people this year and nearly 40,000 will be diagnosed with rectal cancer.

5 Silent Signs of Colon Cancer

  5 Silent Signs of Colon Cancer Being able to spot these warning signs could save your life. For most healthy twentysomethings, cancer doesn't seem like a serious threat. After all, the median age for cancer diagnosis is 66. But last year, a sobering new study from American Cancer Society revealed colorectal cancer (colon cancer and rectal cancer) rates had been rising among adults in their 20s and 30s. At first, researchers chalked it up to enhanced screenings leading to early diagnosis, but later realized more young people were dying from the disease, which is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in America.

The American Cancer Society’s newly updated guidelines for colon and rectal cancer screening recommend that adults at average risk get screened starting at age 45 instead of 50, as previously advised. The updated guidelines come on the heels of what seems to be a rise in colorectal cancer

New research suggests the colon cancer screening like colonoscopy should start at age 45 rather than 50. We ask the experts what they think. “Regardless of the type of screening that is in place, the results of our research strongly indicate that screening for colorectal cancer should begin at the

The two cancers will kill more than 50,000 people this year.

Current guidelines call for people to start getting some kind of cancer screening at age 50. After consulting with experts on just how early to recommend regular screening, the ACS settled on age 45 for people at average risk, which is most Americans.

"That really is the big change in the guideline," Wender said.

"If you have a family history or if you have inflammatory bowel disease, you're at higher risk and you need to start earlier. These guidelines don't apply to you. But for 80 percent of us — we're at average risk and the screening age is now 45."

Any younger might mean a lot of testing with little benefit, said Dr. Daniel Labow, Chief of the Surgical Oncology Division at Mount Sinai Health System in New York.

"The problem is, you'll be doing a lot of tests that are unnecessary," said Labow, who was not involved in drawing up the new recommendations. "We have to balance the risk and benefit."

Colonoscopies can carry some risk, are expensive and expense and usually require sedation.

Screening doesn't necessarily mean a full colonoscopy. Health groups have taken note that many people are not comfortable with getting a colonoscopy — an exam done under sedation with a camera fitted to tube that can be threaded through the entire colon.

If you were born in the 80s or later, you're at significantly higher risk of colon and rectal cancer — and experts say you should get screened younger

  If you were born in the 80s or later, you're at significantly higher risk of colon and rectal cancer — and experts say you should get screened younger Colorectal cancer disease rates are rising quickly for young people, who tend to drink and smoke less, but have higher obesity rates.This spike has led the American Cancer Society (ACS) to recommend that people start getting screened for colorectal cancer — a term often used to describe colon and rectal cancers — at age 45 instead of 50, the society announced Wednesday.

Cancer society officials acknowledge the shift to 45 could cause confusion for doctors and patients but felt strongly that they needed to act now. The advocacy group was influenced by its study, published last year, that found rising rates of colon cancer and deaths in people younger than 50.

Most colon cancer occurs in adults 55 and older, and the good news is rates of cases and deaths have been falling for decades. - NEW YORK: New guidelines released Wednesday recommend U.S. adults start colon cancer screening earlier, at age 45 instead of 50.

The advantage of a colonoscopy is that pre-cancerous lesions called polyps can be removed at the moment they are spotted, which means the exam can actually prevent cancer.

But other screening methods, including virtual colonoscopy, DNA tests for tumors in the stool, and sigmoidoscopies are also acceptable, the group says.

"One of the things people are going to have to be paying attention to, though, is their insurance coverage," Wender said.

"Right now, all insurance is mandated to cover colonoscopy — all the screening options — at age 50. That's not going be true the moment we release this guideline. So we're going to be working on insurance coverage over the next five years to make sure these options are available to everyone."

Most insurance companies, as well as Medicare and Medicaid, cover procedures based on recommendations made by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). The USPSTF recommends screening starting at age 50.

Wender said younger people could start with a cheaper test.

"Let's say you want to get started with screening just as we recommend right now. There's a $30 stool blood test that's available to you today," he said.

Only about two-thirds of Americans who should get screened for colon cancer actually do, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

Higher levels of vitamin D may lower colon cancer risk

  Higher levels of vitamin D may lower colon cancer risk Higher than currently recommended amounts of the 'sunshine vitamin' might offer protection against colorectal cancer. Long touted for its role in keeping bones strong — vitamin D also may be important in preventing colon cancer.New research from the American Cancer Society and other public health groups finds people with higher than recommended blood levels of vitamin D have a lower risk of developing colorectal cancer. The finding was particularly significant for women.The opposite may also be true: people with a vitamin D deficiency were found to have an increased risk for the disease.

Cancer society officials acknowledge the shift to 45 could cause confusion for doctors and patients but felt strongly that they needed to act now. The advocacy group was influenced by its study, published last year, that found rising rates of colon cancer and deaths in people younger than 50.

The American Cancer Society’s newly updated guidelines for colon and rectal cancer screening recommend that adults at average risk get screened starting at age 45 instead of 50, as previously advised. The updated guidelines come on the heels of what seems to be a rise in colorectal cancer

Labow said most patients will follow the recommendations of their doctors, so it's most important for the American Cancer Society to get the word out to medical professionals.

He said he errs on the side of testing with his patients.

"If there is any symptom whatsoever, even if we are pretty confident that it is a hemorrhoid I use it as an excuse to get a colonoscopy," Labow said.

"The threshold to do a screening test is extremely low for me, particularly in anybody who's over age 40. Usually insurers will pay for it if you say 'rectal bleeding'," he added.

"That's not one I usually have to fight with the insurance companies over."

Risk factors for colon cancer include eating meat, especially processed meat, smoking and obesity.

Symptoms that could point to colon cancer include:

  • Bleeding from the rectum
  • Blood in the stool
  • Abdominal cramping
  • A change in the shape of the stool, diarrhea, constipation
  • A change in bowel habits, or the feeling that you need to make a bowel movement but there is none

"If you see any changes, no matter how slight you think they are, go to your doctor and demand a colonoscopy. You don't want to mess around," Johnston said.

What Are The Risks Of Lung Cancer Screenings? .
While early detection is the key to improving lung cancer survival chances, doctors may not be adequately discussing the risks of screening. Doctors, as per guidelines, are advised to openly communicate and discuss both the benefits and risks of lung cancer screening. But researchers at the University of North Carolina (UNC) found adequate explanations are not always provided to patients.The study titled "Evaluating Shared Decision Making for Lung Cancer Screening" was published in JAMA Internal Medicine on Aug. 13.

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