•   
  •   
  •   

Health & Fit Reading Books and Playing Games May Help Prevent Dementia: Study

21:43  30 may  2018
21:43  30 may  2018 Source:   time.com

International Children's Book Day 2018: how reading can boost child development

  International Children's Book Day 2018: how reading can boost child development Monday, April 2 marks International Children's Book Day 2018, which aims to promote and inspire a love of reading among children around the world. Reading is not only a source of joy for both children and parents, but also has many added health benefits, whether books are read alone or together as a family. Here we round up some recent research on the benefits for children's health, development, and imagination. Boost language learning A 2015 US Boost language learning

Playing board games and reading books may be casual pastimes, but new research suggests that activities like these can have a real “Given the growing older population worldwide, promoting regular engagement in intellectual activities might help delay or prevent dementia ,” the study authors write.

Reading Books and Playing Games May Help Prevent Dementia .

  Reading Books and Playing Games May Help Prevent Dementia: Study © Jorg Greuel—Getty Images

Playing board games and reading books may be casual pastimes, but new research suggests that activities like these can have a real impact on a person’s risk for developing dementia in old age.

The new study, published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry, looked at more than 15,500 people ages 65 and older who were living in Hong Kong and were tracked for about five years. The men and women didn’t have dementia at the start of the study, though more than 1,300 people developed it by the end.

At the beginning of the trial and again during follow-up interviews, the men and women were asked about any “intellectual activities” they had done within the last month, including reading books, newspapers, or magazines, playing board games or card games, and even betting on horse racing. Their overall health was also assessed during these meetings.

Certain anticholinergic drugs tied to 30% higher dementia risk, study finds

  Certain anticholinergic drugs tied to 30% higher dementia risk, study finds Many older adults know that long-term use of certain medications can negatively affect cognition and increase one's risk of dementia.But a new study suggests that some classes of anticholinergic drugs -- particularly those used to treat depression, Parkinson's and urinary incontinence -- carry a higher risk than others.

Playing board games and reading books may be casual pastimes, but new research suggests that activities like these can have a real “Given the growing older population worldwide, promoting regular engagement in intellectual activities might help delay or prevent dementia ,” the study authors write.

playing board games , Mahjong, or card games . A game of Mahjong in Suzhou, China (Russ Bowling). As we noted above, the study doesn’t dig into the mechanisms by which robust intellectual activity might prevent dementia , and other geriatric experts aren’t as convinced as its authors that

The researchers found that the risk of developing dementia was significantly lower among people who reported doing daily intellectual activities, compared to people who did them less often or not at all. This lower risk appeared to be independent of other known interventions, like eating healthy and getting regular exercise.

“Given the growing older population worldwide, promoting regular engagement in intellectual activities might help delay or prevent dementia,” the study authors write.

The study didn’t show that activities like reading and playing games definitely cause a person to avoid developing dementia. In an editorial response to the study, two Harvard-affiliated experts, Dr. Deborah Blacker and Jennifer Weuve, note the potential for reverse causation: that participating less in intellectual activities could actually be due to dementia. Still, the researchers, Blacker and Weuve argue that the new study is supported by past research making similar connections. Engaging in mentally challenging activities—even later in life—appears to have a benefit.

This Surprising Factor May Raise Your Risk of Alzheimer’s .
<p>In a study published in the journal Neurology, researchers led by Dr. Zoe Arvanitakis, medical director of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, find more evidence that blood pressure may be one of those risk factors.</p>But in a study published in the journal Neurology, researchers led by Dr. Zoe Arvanitakis, medical director of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, find more evidence that blood pressure may be one of those risk factors.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!