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Health & Fit Pick up your walking speed if you want to live longer says new study

18:50  01 june  2018
18:50  01 june  2018 Source:   msn.com

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New Australian research suggests that just speeding up your walking pace could help reduce your risk of death, especially for older adults and seniors. Led by the University of Sydney along with researchers from the University of Cambridge, University of Edinburgh, University of Limerick

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a group of people standing in the grass: Brisk walking has been found to have benefits, especially for seniors. © Provided by AFPRelaxNews Brisk walking has been found to have benefits, especially for seniors. New Australian research suggests that just speeding up your walking pace could help reduce your risk of death, especially for older adults and seniors.

Led by the University of Sydney along with researchers from the University of Cambridge, University of Edinburgh, University of Limerick, and University of Ulster, the new study set out to assess whether walking speed was associated with a reduced risk of death from cancer, cardiovascular disease, and all-causes.

The researchers looked at the results of 11 population-based surveys in England and Scotland which together included 50,225 participants who self-reported their walking pace.

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The findings confirm previous studies that had linked walking speed to health, but for the first time, the benefit “We don’t want people to just got out and walk faster,” says Studenski. “What we are saying is that your She also stresses that the study did not show that if you are a slow walker , quickening

SYDNEY — Want to live a longer , healthier life? Pick up your pace. A new study finds that people who walk at a brisk pace are much less likely to develop heart disease That said , moving along at an average speed was also associated with a 20 percent risk of death compared to the slowest walkers .

After taking into account influencing factors such as total amount and intensity of all physical activity taken, age, sex and body mass index, the team found that walking at an average pace was associated with a 20 percent lower risk for all-cause mortality compared with walking at a slow pace.

Walking at a brisk or fast pace reduced the risk even further, by 24 percent. 

Walking also helped reduce the risk of death from cardiovascular disease, with walking at an average pace associated with a 24 percent reduced risk and walking at a brisk or fast pace with a 21 percent reduced risk when compared to slow walkers.

In addition, walking was also found to have an even stronger protective effect in older age groups, with the team finding that participants over the age of 60 who walked at an average pace benefited from a 46 percent lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, while those who walked at a fast pace had a 53 percent reduced risk.

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The World / Living . Study Says Walking Faster Could Make You Live Longer . It appears even if you wait until you ’re 60 years old before lacing up a pair of sneaks and giving it a go, you ’ll to be Meanwhile, having your AARP card and picking up the pace a bit meant a 53 percent risk reduction.

However, the team found no evidence that walking pace influenced the risk of cancer mortality.

"A fast pace is generally five to seven kilometers per hour, but it really depends on a walker's fitness levels; an alternative indicator is to walk at a pace that makes you slightly out of breath or sweaty when sustained," explained lead author Professor Emmanuel Stamatakis.

"Especially in situations when walking more isn't possible due to time pressures or a less walking-friendly environment, walking faster may be a good option to get the heart rate up -- one that most people can easily incorporate into their lives."

The results can be found published online in a special issue of the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

Gallery: 100 ways to live to 100 (courtesy Best Life) 100 Ways to Live to 100: So you say that longevity doesn’t run in your family? Good news: You can change that. Turns out, your genes only have a 10 percent influence on how long you’ll live, and experts say that the choices you make throughout your life are much more important. At the beginning of the 20th century, the average lifespan was 31 years; today, it’s almost triple that, thanks to the cumulative effect of many, mostly minor, life tweaks that science has determined to have a real effect. The sooner you start applying these tips, the sooner you can start thinking about what you’ll be doing 50 years from now. What are you waiting for? (And while you’re at it, check out these 40 Best Things to Do in Your 40s!) 100 Ways to Live to 100

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