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Health & Fit What's Your Heart Disease Risk?

22:56  05 june  2018
22:56  05 june  2018 Source:   consumerreports.org

Tooth loss in middle age linked to heart disease

  Tooth loss in middle age linked to heart disease Losing two or more natural teeth in middle age may signal an increased risk for coronary heart disease, a study suggests."In addition to other established associations between dental health and risk of disease, our findings suggest that middle-aged adults who have lost two or more teeth in recent past could be at increased risk for cardiovascular disease," Dr. Lu Qi of Tulane University in New Orleans said in a statement. "That's regardless of the number of natural teeth a person has as a middle-aged adult, or whether they have traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as poor diet or high blood pressure.

Heart disease risk calculations may overestimate the likelihood of heart problems in some and underestimate them in others, according to new research. A new study says current risk calculators for heart attack and stroke may be wrong sometimes. Here, what might work better.

Your heart may be working fine now, but how long will it last? If you've never asked yourself that question, now is the time to start thinking about it. After all, coronary heart disease is the number-one killer of adults in the United States.

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Millions of Americans may want to talk to their doctors about whether or not they need medication to reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease, according to a new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

The study, led by Stanford University researchers, found that the heart disease and stroke risk calculators doctors currently use may significantly overestimate some people’s risk and also underestimate others' risk.

As a result, many people may be unnecessarily taking medication to control risk factors such as high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and others, notably African-Americans, may not be getting enough treatment.

Wide waist with 'normal weight' bigger risk than obesity: study

  Wide waist with 'normal weight' bigger risk than obesity: study People of "normal" weight who sport a wide waist are more at risk of heart problems than obese people, said researchers Friday, urging a rethink of healthy weight guidelines. How fat is distributed on a person's frame determined disease risk as much as how much fat they had overall, according to an investigation of nearly 1,700 people aged 45 and over.

Like what kinds of changes? All things that naturally make your risk of heart disease rise, like Resting Heart Rate. This is how many times your heart beats per minute when you're at rest. A lower rate is associated with a lower risk of death because it' s usually a sign of your cardiovascular fitness.

What ' s Your Heart Disease Risk ? High cholesterol, lifestyle choices, and other factors increase heart attack risk . Find out if you're likely to have a heart attack within the next 10 years. The greater your risk for heart disease within 10 years, the more aggressively you should approach prevention.

Some previous studies have suggested that traditional risk calculators, particularly the ACC/AHA ASCVD Risk Calculator developed by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association in 2013, may overestimate risk. To remedy that, these researchers developed a new risk calculation method with a more sophisticated statistical model and newer population data than existing calculators, and they suggest that it may be more accurate.

Some other experts agree. Though it's not quite ready for wide usage yet, “this has high potential to be a breakthrough in being able to much more accurately predict cardiovascular disease risk,” says Andrew DeFilippis, M.D., M.Sc., assistant professor in the department of medicine at the University of Louisville in Kentucky, who co-authored an editorial accompanying the study.

Study: Having More Kids Linked to Heart Disease

  Study: Having More Kids Linked to Heart Disease Researchers hope their work will encourage people with big families to look after their heart health. Scientists have found a link between having a large family and the risk of heart disease in women.Researchers at Cambridge University found that mothers with five or more children were 38% more likely to be hospitalized with a heart attack, at 29% higher risk of having cardiovascular disease, and 17% more likely to experience heart failure, The Times reported. This group was also associated with a 25% higher risk of having a stroke.

Your heart disease risk isn't determined by family history or age alone. Take charge of your heart health by managing factors you can control, like You may not have control over some risks , but there are other factors that you can eliminate or at least manage. Find out what you need to know to take

Generally, heart disease risks also include family history, excessive alcohol use, and lack of physical activity. The study is the first to look at groups of men and women, both white and black, over 50 years. As such, it represents a more complete risk picture than previous studies of shorter durations

Here’s what you need to know about this new research, the drawbacks of current heart risk calculators, and what to ask your doctor now.  

What the New Study Found

Heart risk calculators are fairly simple: Your doctor (or you) enter information online, such as your age, gender, blood pressure and cholesterol levels, as well as whether or not you smoke or have a family history of type 2 diabetes. The calculator then estimates your overall risk of having a heart attack or stroke over the next decade. The ideal is a 10-year risk that’s less than 7.5 percent.

For the new study, researchers focused on the ACC/AHA calculator, which is the most commonly used. The researchers gathered health information from the medical records of more than 26,000 adults ages 40 to 79 and assessed their heart disease risks—comparing the results of the new calculator with those of the ACC/AHA calculator.

Men With Erectile Dysfunction Are Twice As Likely to Have Heart Disease, Study Says

  Men With Erectile Dysfunction Are Twice As Likely to Have Heart Disease, Study Says Among a group of 1,900 men aged 60 to 78, those with erectile dysfunction were twice as likely as men without the condition to have a heart attack, stroke, or die of a heart problem.By now, most people are familiar with the factors that can increase the risk of having a heart attack: gaining too much weight, having high blood pressure or high cholesterol levels, smoking and not exercising enough.

Millions of Americans may want to talk to their doctors about whether or not they need medication to reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease , according to a new study published in the Annals

Based on data from the Framingham Heart Study-- a long-term study of thousands of men and women--the following quiz will provide you with a picture of your 10-year risk of developing heart disease . For each question, use the information given to come up with a point score. Once you?e calculated your

They found that the ACC/AHA calculator may have mistakenly overestimated the study subjects' risks of heart disease on average by about 20 percent. Using the new calculator would “translate into almost 12 million fewer Americans taking medications like statins,” says Nancy Cook, Sc.D., a biostatistician and professor in the department of medicine at the Brigham & Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

The study also found both underestimation and overestimation of risk for African-American adults. In about one in three, “their risk was calculated as much lower or much higher than white adults with the exact same identical risk factors,” explains Sanjay Basu, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of medicine at Stanford University and senior author of the new study.

That didn’t completely surprise Basu. “A couple of years ago, I had an African-American male patient in my office whom I was worried about, because I thought he had a high risk of stroke—he had high cholesterol and was a heavy smoker,” says Basu. “But when I plugged his numbers into the ACC/AHA risk calculator, his risk came up as 4 percent, which I thought seemed bizarrely low. When on a hunch I switched his ethnicity from black to white, his risk shot up to 15 percent. It made me suspect that something was off about the statistical analysis of the calculator.”

More Women Are Having Heart Attacks During Pregnancy and Birth

  More Women Are Having Heart Attacks During Pregnancy and Birth Part of the increase may be due to the rising age of mothers.In a new study, published Wednesday in the journal Mayo Clinical Proceedings, researchers looked at more than 49 million births.Among the women who gave birth, 1,061 had a heart attack during their labor and delivery; 922 had heart attacks during their pregnancy, and 2,390 women had heart attacks after they gave birth.

Everyday Health Heart Health Heart Disease . Obesity and Heart Disease : What ’ s the Connection? The link between heart disease and obesity is multifaceted. For one thing, obesity increases your risk of developing many other risk factors for heart disease .

Heart disease is an equal opportunity killer. It' s true that women have fewer heart attacks than men before they reach menopause, but after that women The good news is that kicking butt, as in quitting smoking, dramatically cuts the risk to your heart , even during the first year, no matter what your age.

What Should You Do?

If you are African-American, it's especially important to be aware of heart disease risk factors, such as high cholesterol and high blood pressure levels or being overweight. It's also key to work to control them and to talk to your doctor about whether medication is appropriate—even if your score on a heart risk calculator is low, DeFilippis says. The same may hold true if you are Hispanic. 

No matter what ethnic group you're in, if you’re currently taking blood pressure or cholesterol medication, or daily low-dose aspirin to reduce your risk of heart attack or stroke, it’s important to have a conversation with your doctor, says Michael Hochman, M.D., M.P.H., director of the Gehr Center for Health Systems Science at the Keck School of Medicine at USC in Los Angeles. In cases like the following, there’s solid evidence for medication use:

• Uncontrolled blood pressure of 140/90 or higher if you’re under age 60, or if you’re over 60, a top number higher than 150.

• A previous heart attack or stroke. Anyone who has had such an event should automatically be put on a statin medication and daily aspirin, Hochman says.

If you don’t fit into the categories above, your doctor can use a risk assessment tool to help gauge whether you should be taking medication or not. But which one? 

More Women Are Having Heart Attacks During Pregnancy and Birth

  More Women Are Having Heart Attacks During Pregnancy and Birth Part of the increase may be due to the rising age of mothers.In a new study, published Wednesday in the journal Mayo Clinical Proceedings, researchers looked at more than 49 million births.Among the women who gave birth, 1,061 had a heart attack during their labor and delivery; 922 had heart attacks during their pregnancy, and 2,390 women had heart attacks after they gave birth.

People with more than one risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) might be at much greater risk for CHD than people with no risk factors. This condition strains the heart , and increases wear and tear on the blood vessels, making blockage more likely. 2. What is your race?

Research about nuts and heart disease shows they can lower your risks , improve your diet and weight loss, and help you lead a healthier life. Based on the research, here' s a breakdown of the links betweeen nuts and heart disease , and what makes nuts heart healthy. I hope this will help you make

You might consider the calculator developed by Basu and his team, but keep in mind that more research is needed to make sure it works for everyone, DeFilippis stresses.

Or ask your doctor about an older calculator called the Reynolds Risk Score, advises Steven Nissen, M.D., chairman of the department of cardiovascular medicine at the Cleveland Clinic.

A study published in 2015 in the Annals of Internal Medicine found that it was the least flawed of the risk calculators then available, although it did overestimate risk among men by 9 percent and underestimated it among women by 21 percent. And be aware that the Reynolds calculator was studied only in doctors and nurses, who are more likely to be at low risk than more diverse workplace groups, Basu says.

Remember, too, that a heart disease risk calculator is just a starting point for a discussion with your doctor about your overall health and the pros and cons of medication use for you. “We don’t want anyone to base treatment choices solely off of the risk calculator,” Basu says. 

For those at somewhat lower risk of heart disease—a calculator score between 7.5 and 10—trying lifestyle changes first may be worthwhile, Hochman says. That means stopping smoking, losing excess weight, being physically active, consuming a heart-healthy diet, and drinking alcohol in moderation only, which are smart strategies whether you're at risk for heart disease or not.

A combination of reduced sodium intake and the DASH diet (rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low or fat-free dairy, fish, poultry, beans, seeds, and nuts), for example, appeared to dramatically lower blood pressure in adults with hypertension, according to a Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center study presented last year at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions’ annual meeting. If that doesn’t lower your risk enough after three to six months, then consider medication.

But at the end of the day, “the determination of whether to go on medication should be a personalized decision,” Basu says.

Consumer Reports is an independent, nonprofit organization that works side by side with consumers to create a fairer, safer, and healthier world. CR does not endorse products or services, and does not accept advertising. Copyright © 2018, Consumer Reports, Inc.

Scientists have found a way to calculate your risk for deadly conditions like diabetes, breast cancer and heart disease .
<p>The scientists behind the test are currently working on building a website where patients can upload their DNA information from 23andMe or Ancestry.com and receive risk scores from their data.</p><p></p>By examining changes in DNA at 6.6 million places in the human genome, scientists were able to identify a greater portion of the population at risk. This could enable enhanced screening or preventive therapies if integrated into clinical care.

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