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Health & Fit Smoking hits new low; about 14 percent of US adults light up

19:04  19 june  2018
19:04  19 june  2018 Source:   ap.org

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Smoking in the U . S . has hit another all-time low . About 14 percent of U . S adults were smokers last year, down from about 16 percent the year before, government figures show. There hadn’t been much change the previous two years, but it’s been clear there’s been a general decline and the new

About 14 percent of U . S adults were smokers last year, down from about 16 percent the year before, government figures show. Survey results out last week showed smoking among high school students was down to 9 percent, also a new low . In the early 1960s, roughly 42 percent of U . S

FILE - In this June 22, 2012, file photo, a smoker snuffs out a cigarette at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. The rate of smoking among adults in the U.S. fell to about 14 percent in 2017, according to new data released by the government Tuesday, June 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File) © The Associated Press FILE - In this June 22, 2012, file photo, a smoker snuffs out a cigarette at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. The rate of smoking among adults in the U.S. fell to about 14 percent in 2017, according to new data released by the government Tuesday, June 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

NEW YORK — Smoking in the U.S. has hit another all-time low.

About 14 percent of U.S adults were smokers last year, down from about 16 percent the year before, government figures show.

There hadn't been much change the previous two years, but it's been clear there's been a general decline and the new figures show it's continuing, said K. Michael Cummings of the tobacco research program at Medical University of South Carolina.

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About 14 percent of U . S adults were smokers last year, down from about 16 percent the year before, government figures show. Survey results out last week showed smoking among high school students was down to 9 percent, also a new low . In the early 1960s, roughly 42 percent of U . S

About 14 percent of U . S adults were smokers last year, down from about 16 percent the year before, government figures show. There hadn’t been Teens are also shunning cigarettes. Survey results out last week showed smoking among high school students was down to 9 percent, also a new low .

"Everything is pointed in the right direction," including falling cigarette sales and other indicators, Cummings said.

The new figures released Tuesday mean there are still more than 30 million adult smokers in the U.S., he added.

Teens are also shunning cigarettes. Survey results out last week showed smoking among high school students was down to 9 percent, also a new low.

In the early 1960s, roughly 42 percent of U.S. adults smoked. It was common nearly everywhere — in office buildings, restaurants, airplanes and even hospitals. The decline has coincided with a greater understanding that smoking is a cause of cancer, heart disease and other health problems.

Anti-smoking campaigns, cigarette taxes and smoking bans are combining to bring down adult smoking rates, experts say.

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About 14 percent of U . S adults were smokers last year, down from about 16 percent the year before, government figures show. Teens are also shunning cigarettes. Survey results out last week showed smoking among high school students was down to 9 percent, also a new low .

NEW YORK -- Smoking in the U . S . has hit another all-time low . About 14 percent of U . S adults were smokers last year, down from about 16 percent Teens are also shunning cigarettes. Survey results out last week showed smoking among high school students was down to 9 percent, also a new low .

The launch of electronic cigarettes and their growing popularity has also likely played a role. E-cigarettes heat liquid nicotine into a vapor without the harmful by-products generated from burning tobacco. That makes them a potentially useful tool to help smokers quit, but some public health experts worry it also creates a new way for people to get addicted to nicotine.

There was no new information for adult use of e-cigarettes and vaping products, but 2016 figures put that at 3 percent of adults.

Vaping is more common among teens than adults. About 13 percent of high school students use e-cigarettes or other vaping devices.

The findings on adult smokers come from a national health survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 27,000 adults were interviewed last year.

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The Associated Press Health & Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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