Health & Fit: Tuberculosis Exposure at Johns Hopkins Hospital - PressFrom - US
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Health & Fit Tuberculosis Exposure at Johns Hopkins Hospital

00:05  06 july  2018
00:05  06 july  2018 Source:   newsweek.com

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Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore evacuated due to possible TB exposure - Продолжительность: 4:42 Martin Brodel 821 просмотр. Vials of the dangerous tuberculosis bacteria broke at Johns Hopkins Hospital Thursday, causing a stir of activity around the complex as hazmat personnel tried

A building at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore was evacuated on Thursday due to a possible tuberculosis exposure , fire officials said. So far, all indications are that no other individuals have been exposed , however the buildings will remain evacuated until cleared by public safety officials

Vials of the dangerous tuberculosis bacteria broke at Johns Hopkins Hospital Thursday, causing a stir of activity around the complex as hazmat personnel tried to contain any contamination of the bacteria that is known to cause life-threatening illness. 

Crowds of medical staff streamed out of the hospital on Thursday afternoon after the Baltimore medical facility ordered an evacuation of two buildings after possible tuberculosis exposure.

Aerial shots of the scene from the local television station WBAL-TV show two fire trucks parked outside the complex as onlookers stand nearby.

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The Baltimore City Fire Department responded to Johns Hopkins Hospital to investigate after “a small sample of frozen tuberculosis ” being used for research purposes was inadvertently released in an internal bridge between Cancer Research Building 1 and Cancer Research Building 2

Two buildings on the campus of Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore were evacuated because of a tuberculosis contamination. Be Smarter. Faster. More Colorful

Johns Hopkins Hospital and surroundings. The Baltimore City Fire Department is currently investigating a case of tuberculosis contaimination at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore.: 588710206 © Getty Images 588710206

The Baltimore City Fire Department is currently investigating the release of tuberculosis, which was being transported in an internal bridge connecting two cancer research buildings, according to a statement from Kim Hoppe, a spokesperson for the hospital.

“Employees were in the area when the incident occurred, and these employees have been isolated and are expected to be evacuated by the fire department,” Hoppe said in a statement to Newsweek. “So far, all indications are that no other individuals have been exposed, however the buildings will remain evacuated until cleared by public safety officials." 

According to eyewitness reports from WBAL-TV, a fire alarm went off during a frenzy of people leaving the buildings. Some employees said they were told not to walk down a certain hallway. Other people who might have been exposed are being sheltered in place.

Tuberculosis is a highly contagious bacteria that can be spread through the air. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but it can attack other organs, like the kidneys or the brain, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The most recent data from the CDC shows that tuberculosis cases have seen a decline in recent years, with just 9,272 cases reported in the United States in 2016.

Not everyone infected with the bacteria will become sick, but the most extreme cases can be fatal. 

The deadliest infectious disease is becoming drug-resistant .
<p>Tuberculosis isn’t a disease Americans hear about much about these days, but that’s not true for the rest of the world. TB is currently the deadliest infectious disease, responsible for 1.6 million deaths last year.</p>Tuberculosis (TB) isn’t a disease Americans hear about much about these days, but that’s not true for the rest of the world. TB is currently the deadliest infectious disease, responsible for 1.6 million deaths last year, most of them in the developing world.

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