Health & Fit: Bad Marriages As Harmful To Health As Smoking: Study - - PressFrom - US
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Health & Fit Bad Marriages As Harmful To Health As Smoking: Study

18:11  19 july  2018
18:11  19 july  2018 Source:   medicaldaily.com

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Over time, smoking becomes a bad habit that is harmful to our health and affects the appearance. Smoking not only casts negative effects over the Psychologists Say a Bad Marriage May Be Just As Harmful for Your - relevantmagazine.com. Rosie Shrout, who presented results of the study at the.

Home › Forums › Health and Fitness › Bad Marriage as harmful as smoking . This topic contains 6 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by Grumpy 9 months, 2 weeks ago. bad marriage = bad for you like smoking lol fukn funny. I was gonna self immolate over my bad marriage .

Frequent conflicts regarding topics like children or money were linked to poorer health among married couples in a new study, particularly for husbands.

In a marriage, having disagreements now and then is surely nothing out of the ordinary. In fact, it can be useful in encouraging honesty and improving communication between partners.

"Fighting is so good because your relationship is about growing and becoming the very best person you can become. Fights are one of your best tools for learning," said Chicago-based relationship expert Dr. Judith Wright.

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An unhappy marriage may be seriously detrimental to your health , according to psychologists. Rosie Shrout, who presented results of the study at the International Association for Relationship Research Conference, said that experiencing a great deal of conflict in a marriage is just as detrimental as

Being in a bad marriage , a study finds, is just as bad as smoking . This finding seems to be opposite of many other studies that say marriage improves health . For example, one British study found that being married improved a person’s chances of surviving a heart attack.

But prolonged and unresolved conflicts on several subjects can take a heavy toll on our health, according to researchers at the University of Nevada and the University of Michigan. The preliminary results of their new study were presented at the International Association for Relationship Research (IARR) Conference in Colorado.

The research team followed 373 straight couples over the first 16 years of their marriage. The aim was to observe the long-term implications of frequent disagreements regarding children, money, in-laws etc.

Subjective health was reported by the participants who were asked questions about their quality of sleep, nervousness, headaches, whether their health affected their work, and more.

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New research from the University of California-San Francisco found that anxiety and depression can be as bad for health as smoking and obesity and increase the risk for serious health conditions, including heart disease. As CTV News reported, the research looked at health data from a government study

People under 65 who eat a lot of meat, eggs and dairy are four times as likely to die from cancer or diabetes, study suggests.

Engaging in regular conflict over a long period was found to have a negative impact on the health of both spouses. But husbands were at relatively higher risk of suffering adverse effects compared to wives. On the flip side, studies from the past have suggested that men are also more likely to reap the benefits of a good marriage than women.

The study also examined if the number of marital conflict topics could influence outcomes. While the number of topics seemed to drive the decline in the health of husbands, the factor was found to have no relation to the health of wives.

Rosie Shroud, who presented the findings at the IARR conference, noted that high levels of conflict in a marriage can be as detrimental as habits like smoking and drinking.

"Conflict can be particularly damaging for health if spouses are hostile or defensive during disagreements or if they are arguing about the same topic over and over again without any resolution," she said.

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A bad marriage with frequent conflicts could have a serious detrimental impact on your health , according to In contrast, the results of this recent study might challenge the notion that marriage is always a good “Experiencing a great deal of conflict in a relationship is very damaging to health , as

On average married people live healthier , longer lives. But a new study suggests that if the marriage is a bad one, the opposite is true. “Experiencing a great deal of conflict in a relationship is very damaging to health , as are negative health behaviours like smoking and drinking,” says Rosie

This may lead to damaging responses such as poor mental health, excess production of stress hormones, inflammation, changes in appetite and more. Unsurprisingly, this can wreak havoc on your well-being in the long run.

One study from 2016 linked frequent marital arguments with muscle pains and heart-related problems. Another study published in 2013 linked relationship anxiety to immune system damage.

We already know from previous research that being married has the potential to be beneficial for both physical and mental health. But the new findings offer a sobering reminder that the nature of a relationship still makes the biggest difference to our well-being.

"It’s not the act of walking down the aisle or signing a marriage license that is beneficial for health — it’s what spouses do for each other throughout the marriage," Shroud added.

  Bad Marriages As Harmful To Health As Smoking: Study © PeopleImages/Getty Images

A Good Marriage May Help You Live Longer. Here's Why .
<p>Married people who rated their unions as “very happy” or “pretty happy” had roughly 20% lower odds of dying early than people who said their marriages were “not too happy."</p>Married people who rated their unions as “very happy” or “pretty happy” had roughly 20% lower odds of dying early than people who said their marriages were “not too happy,” according to a recent study published in the journal Health Psychology. The work expands on existing studies that have linked marriage to a number of positive health outcomes, from a healthy heart to a trimmer waistline.

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