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Health & Fit Even low levels of air pollution could cause serious changes to the heart, finds new research

16:10  03 august  2018
16:10  03 august  2018 Source:   msn.com

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Could a Mediterranean diet offset the negative effects of air pollution ? New US research has found that eating a Mediterranean diet may provide some protection from the harmful effects of long-term exposure to air pollution , helping to reduce the risk of heart attacks, stroke and other causes of death.

New UK research has found that even air pollution levels that fall well within UK guidelines could cause changes in the structure of the heart , similar to those seen in the early stages of heart failure. The team found that though most participants lived outside major UK cities, there was a clear link.

(video courtesy Newsweek) New UK research has found that even air pollution levels that fall well within UK guidelines could cause changes in the structure of the heart, similar to those seen in the early stages of heart failure.

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Regular exposure to even low levels of air pollution may cause changes to the heart similar to those in the early stages of heart failure, experts say. A study of 4,000 people in the UK found those who lived by loud, busy roads had larger hearts on average than those living in less polluted areas.

Researchers have found that people exposed to air pollution levels well within UK guidelines have changes in the structure of the heart , similar to Higher exposures to the pollutants were linked to more significant changes in the structure of the heart . For every 1 extra µg per cubic metre of PM2.5

Led by Queen Mary University of London and part-funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF), the new study looked at data from 3,920 participants in the long-term health study, U.K. Biobank.

Participants were asked to provide a range of personal information, including their lifestyles, health record and details on where they have lived, in addition to completing blood tests and health scans. 

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Research last year found that in some polluted areas such as central London, average levels of PM2.5 were above 18µg/ m3, with even Katie Nield of environmental legal group ClientEarth said: “This study is particularly worrying as it shows the serious health effects of air pollution at levels

New research suggests that even low levels of air pollution may cause alterations in the heart that are akin to the early stages of heart failure. Share on Pinterest. Living next to a busy road may cause you serious heart problems, a new study suggests. The perils of air pollution are real and

All participants were free from pre-existing cardiovascular disease.

Heart MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scans were used to measure the size, weight and function of their hearts at fixed times.

The team found that though most participants lived outside major UK cities, there was a clear link between those who lived near loud, busy roads and were exposed to nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a pollutant generated by traffic, or fine particulate matter (PM2.5), very small particles of air pollution, and the development of larger right and left ventricles in the heart, which are important pumping chambers.

Although these participants were healthy and had no symptoms, the changes in their hearts were similar to those in the early stages of heart failure.

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Researchers have found that people exposed to air pollution levels well within UK guidelines have Higher exposures to the pollutants were linked to more significant changes in the structure of the heart . This research could help explain exactly how and why air pollution affects the heart .

Researchers have found that people exposed to air pollution levels well within UK guidelines have Higher exposures to the pollutants were linked to more significant changes in the structure of the heart . This research could help explain exactly how and why air pollution affects the heart .

In addition, the higher the exposure to the pollutants, the more significant the changes in the structure of the heart. For every 1 extra μg per cubic meter of PM2.5 and for every 10 extra μg per cubic meter of NO2, the heart enlarges by approximately 1 percent.

In the study, average annual exposures to PM2.5 were between 8-12μg per cubic meter, within UK guidelines of 25μg per cubic meter, though World Health Organisation (WHO) guidelines are much lower, just 10μg per cubic meter.

Participants' average exposure to NO2 was 10-50μg per cubic meter, which is close to and sometimes above the WHO and UK annual average guidelines, which are both 40μg per cubic meter.

Dr. Nay Aung, who led the data analysis from Queen Mary University of London said, "Although our study was observational and hasn't yet shown a causal link, we saw significant changes in the heart, even at relatively low levels of air pollution exposure. Our future studies will include data from those living in inner cities like Central Manchester and London, using more in-depth measurements of heart function, and we would expect the findings to be even more pronounced and clinically important."

Air pollution may account for 1 in 7 new diabetes cases

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Research from the UK has found that people exposed to even low levels of air pollution have heart Higher exposures to the pollutants were linked to more significant changes in the structure of the heart . This research could help explain exactly how and why air pollution affects the heart .

“ Polluted air can cause everyone to reduce their level of education by one year, which is huge,” said Xi Previous research has found that air pollution harms cognitive performance in students, but The study followed the same individuals as air pollution varied from one year to the next, meaning

"Air pollution should be seen as a modifiable risk factor. Doctors and the general public all need to be aware of their exposure when they think about their heart health, just like they think about their blood pressure, their cholesterol and their weight."

The study was published in Circulation.

a car parked on the side of a road: New research has found that exposure to even low levels of pollution could have a negative effect on the heart. © Provided by AFPRelaxNews New research has found that exposure to even low levels of pollution could have a negative effect on the heart.

Noise: The other pollution hurting our health .
New guidelines for noise levels were released today by the World Health Organization amid one in five Europeans being regularly exposed to noise levels that could "significantly" damage their health. Environmental noise is among the "top environmental risks to health," according to the WHO report.

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