Health & Fit: Mary Tyler Moore shed light on diabetes - PressFrom - US
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Health & Fit Mary Tyler Moore shed light on diabetes

01:50  27 january  2017
01:50  27 january  2017 Source:   usatoday.com

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Mary Tyler Moore died from cardiopulmonary arrest brought on by 3 other serious medical conditions According to the death certificate, obtained by TMZ, the contributing factors to her death last week were aspiration pneumonia, hypoxia (lack of oxygen to her tissues) and diabetes mellitus.

For people with type 1 diabetes, Mary Tyler Moore, who died Wednesday at age 80, was not just an actress. She was a fellow traveler who helped bring a widely misunderstood disease out of the shadows.

Moore was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in her 30s, and kept it a secret for much of her career. But eventually she became an outspoken advocate. As the longtime International Chairman of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, now known as JDRF, Moore testified before congressional committees and made many public service announcements and appearances.

WASHINGTON - In this 2003 photo, actress Mary Tyler Moore, who died Wednesday, testified before Congress on behalf of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. © Alex Wong, Getty Images WASHINGTON - In this 2003 photo, actress Mary Tyler Moore, who died Wednesday, testified before Congress on behalf of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

“She was a role model and a source of inspiration,” who raised awareness and research money during an era when treatment emerged from “the dark ages” and edged toward a cure, said JDRF CEO Derek Rapp.

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Mary Tyler Moore , Dick Van Dyke and Larry Matthews in a publicity still from The Dick Van Dyke Show. For fans of the late, great Mary Tyler Moore , the phrase “Love is all around” transcends the theme to her stereotype-shattering TV show. In the annals of television history, one would be hard

Mary Tyler Moore 's death on Wednesday at age 80 may highlight the long-term effects that type 1 diabetes can have on the body. In those with type 1 diabetes , glucose instead builds up in the blood stream, and can cause fatigue, weakness, weight loss and excessive urination when untreated.

In type 1 diabetes, the body cannot make insulin, a hormone the body needs to get glucose from the bloodstream to the rest of the body. Because it is often diagnosed in children or young adults, it was formerly known as juvenile diabetes. It is much less common than type 2 diabetes, which typically develops later in life.

In an appearance at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., in 2009, Moore recounted her diagnosis 40 years earlier, after a miscarriage.

“A blood test revealed that my blood sugar level was 750. Normal is between 70 and 110. And they did not know how I was still alive and walking around. But within 48 hours, I was brought back to normal, and then began the hard part, living with the disease.”

She explained why she hesitated to become an advocate when the JDRF first approached her, in 1984: “At the time, I hadn’t taken ownership of my diabetes. I wasn’t sure I wanted the world to know that behind the smile that could turn it on was an independent woman who was dependent on multiple shots of insulin a day, just to stay alive.”

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Actress Mary Tyler Moore talked with CNN's Larry King about living with diabetes in 2005.

Emmy-Award winning actress Mary Tyler Moore is nearly blind from her battle with diabetes , according to friends of the star.

But she said she was glad she got over that reluctance.

In a 2009 book Growing Up Again: Life, Loves, and Oh Yeah, Diabetes, Moore said diabetes had permanently affected her vision, balance and stamina, and she shared her struggles to give up alcohol and smoking, according to a Publishers’ Weekly review.

The JDRF now includes the book in a care package for newly diagnosed adults.

Her personal struggles and the way she overcame them “were very powerful,” for others, Rapp said.  Moore’s husband S. Robert Levine, a physician, remains involved in the organization.

Moore also was an animal rights advocate. The Humane Society tweeted: “We are so saddened by the passing of our friend.”

Diabetes Continues Its Relentless Rise .
Two new studies on diabetes deliver good and bad news, but the overall message is that the blood sugar disease remains a formidable public health burden. The first study looked at the incidence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in U.S. children, and uncovered this troubling trend: From 2002 to 2012, the rates for both types of diabetes increased, especially among racial and ethnic minorities.

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usr: 3
This is interesting!