Health & Fit: Your “Forgetfulness” Could Be a Sign of a Another Problem—and It’s Not Alzheimer’s - Thierry Lhermitte, guest of The Wall (TF1): "I could have become a researcher" - PressFrom - US
  •   
  •   
  •   

Health & FitYour “Forgetfulness” Could Be a Sign of a Another Problem—and It’s Not Alzheimer’s

18:45  25 february  2019
18:45  25 february  2019 Source:   rd.com

Holland America to Host Cruise for Alzheimer Patients and Their Caregivers

Holland America to Host Cruise for Alzheimer Patients and Their Caregivers The cruise is in conjunction with an Alzheimer's and dementia conference onboard the ship.

Alzheimer ’ s disease? A new study from the University of Toronto suggests that at least some forgetfulness may be due to hearing troubles. The researchers found that while most of the patients’ brains were functioning fine— it was their hearing that was suspect. Yet only 20 percent were wearing

Alzheimer ’ s disease? A new study from the University of Toronto suggests that at least some forgetfulness may be due to hearing troubles. The researchers found that while most of the patients’ brains were functioning fine— it was their hearing that was suspect. Yet only 20 percent were wearing

Your “Forgetfulness” Could Be a Sign of a Another Problem—and It’s Not Alzheimer’s© Provided by Trusted Media Brands, Inc. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) of the brain (sagittal view) Memory loss and confusion are among the most frightening aspects of aging: Is it a sign of dementia? Alzheimer’s disease? A new study from the University of Toronto suggests that at least some forgetfulness may be due to hearing troubles.

The research, published in the Canadian Journal on Aging, analyzed cognitive screens in a group of elderly people who were complaining about forgetfulness and other mental processing issues that suggest dementia. The researchers found that while most of the patients’ brains were functioning fine—it was their hearing that was suspect. Yet only 20 percent were wearing a hearing aid. The researchers point out that you can’t remember something you never heard. Plus, following directions is tough if you can’t hear them. Look out for the 5 signs of hearing loss many people ignore.

B. Smith's husband criticized for having girlfriend while she battles Alzheimer's

B. Smith's husband criticized for having girlfriend while she battles Alzheimer's Dan Gasby has fired back at critics upset that he has a girlfriend while caring for his ailing wife of 26 years.

Alzheimer ’ s disease? A new study from the University of Toronto suggests that at least some forgetfulness may be due to hearing troubles. The researchers found that while most of the patients’ brains were functioning fine— it was their hearing that was suspect. Yet only 20 percent were wearing

You can 't remember something you never heard and you can 't follow directions if you didn't hear them right. Chalie Chulapornsiri/ShutterstockMemory loss and confusion are among the most frightening aspects of aging: Is it a sign of dementia? Alzheimer ’ s disease? A new study from the University of

The Canadian research builds on previous studies linking hearing loss to dementia. If you feel like your memory is giving you trouble, talk to your doctor about a hearing screen. According to a report on the study, people that have untreated hearing loss could eventually lead to dementia. People who have trouble communicating are at risk for social isolation and loneliness—conditions that can contribute to dementia. Only a fraction of the people who need hearing aids wear them—it’s a national healthcare crisis.

Related video: Early Signs of Alzheimer’s Disease to Watch For (Provided by Self)

Read More

Here’s How to Predict Whether Your Memory Loss Will Be Alzheimer’s.
Being aware of your own memory loss can be a good predictor that you won’t develop Alzheimer’s. The study authors began with the premise that one common feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an impaired awareness of illness (clinically, it’s called “anosognosia”) and wanted to test their theory that the lack of awareness can be used to predict whether someone with “mild cognitive impairment” will progress to full-on AD.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!