Health & Fit: Hospital Patients Are Spreading Superbugs - - PressFrom - US
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Health & FitHospital Patients Are Spreading Superbugs

18:35  15 april  2019
18:35  15 april  2019 Source:   247tempo.com

Cleaning routine shows promise in curbing superbug infection

Cleaning routine shows promise in curbing superbug infection A new study finds a way for people to cut their risk of developing a dangerous superbug infection after leaving the hospital. 

Many consumers associate hospitals with the near constant spread of germs, and a recent study suggests that thought may not be too far off.According to.

Superbugs threaten hospital patients . 1 in 4 catheter- and surgery-related HAIs caused by six resistant bacteria in long-term hospitals . “New data show that far too many patients are getting infected with dangerous With this funding, CDC will fight the spread of antibiotic resistance by

Hospital Patients Are Spreading Superbugs

Doctors, nurses, and other hospital workers wash their hands thoroughly and often to avoid spreading germs. According to a new study from the University of Michigan, patients should probably do the same.

The study, published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, revealed that some 14% of 399 hospital patients tested had multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) -- so-called superbugs -- on their hands or in their nostrils early in their hospital stays. Another 6% of patients got MDROs later in their stays. Henry Ford Health System researchers involved in the study also found antibiotic-resistant bacteria on one-fifth of the objects affected patients touch most often.

Leaving the hospital early can double the odds of going back

Leaving the hospital early can double the odds of going back Patients who discharge themselves from the hospital against medical advice are twice as likely to be back within 30 days as those who leave when doctors say they're ready, a large study finds.

Ordinarily, hospitals are considered one of the major hotspots of antibiotic resistance, with many, if not most, superbug strains originating from and spreading Because they only looked at patients from one hospital , there needs to be more research done to figure out whether these community

Doctors, nurses, and other hospital workers wash their hands thoroughly and often to avoid spreading germs. According to a new study from the University of Michigan, patients should probably do the same.

It isn’t known exactly when and where hospital patients acquire MDROs, and the study doesn’t address the question -- but they can cause the kinds of infections even doctors are afraid of.

Katherine Reyes, M.D., lead author for the Henry Ford researchers, stresses how important handwashing and environmental cleaning are in health care. “Germs are on our hands,” she told Science Daily. “When these germs are not washed off, they pass easily from person to person and objects to person and make people sick.” (These are the states where people are too sick to work.)

Another of the study’s authors, Lona Mody, a professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School, added that “this study is a good reminder to clean your hands often, using good techniques -- especially before and after preparing food, before eating food, after using a toilet, and before and after caring for someone who is sick.”

Read More

Seagulls could carry drug-resistant superbugs, study finds.
Some Australian seagulls are infected with superbugs resistant to antibiotics, according to new research, which raises concerns that the bacteria could spread from the birds to livestock or humans. The study, authored by a team of scientists at Murdoch University in Perth and published in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, found that Australian silver gulls are infected with "antimicrobial resistant bacteria that cause serious infections in humans such as urinary tract infections and sepsis.

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This is interesting!