Health & Fit: Florida lawmakers OK sweeping reforms to crack down on deadly cosmetic surgery facilities - PressFrom - US
  •   
  •   
  •   

Health & FitFlorida lawmakers OK sweeping reforms to crack down on deadly cosmetic surgery facilities

23:05  01 may  2019
23:05  01 may  2019 Source:   usatoday.com

Why millennial women are seeking out plastic surgeons: 'Now it's part of my routine.'

Why millennial women are seeking out plastic surgeons: 'Now it's part of my routine.' Millennials are showing up in plastic surgeons’ offices for a variety of procedures. Some request surgery. But many want “prejuvenation."

Florida lawmakers OK sweeping reforms to crack down on deadly cosmetic surgery facilities© Provided by USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Satellite Information Network, Inc.

After years of rampant deaths in Florida's cosmetic surgery clinics, state lawmakers approved sweeping legislation that calls for some of the nation's strictest controls of the industry.

If signed by the governor, the new law will allow the state for the first time to punish dangerous plastic surgery facilities and shut down the worst offenders.

The legislation comes after years of no regulation in Florida, where private investors opened high-volume, discount clinics that became magnets for women seeking cosmetic procedures.

Kylie Jenner Just Admitted Which Plastic Surgery Rumors Are True and Which Aren't

Kylie Jenner Just Admitted Which Plastic Surgery Rumors Are True and Which Aren't She set the record straight in a new interview.

"It's been long overdue," said Crystal Call, 34, of New York, whose mother found her in a locked recovery room nearly bleeding to death after her surgery in Miami. "[It's] sad that so many people had to die or have serious injuries to do so."

The effort to toughen the law began two months ago following an investigation by USA TODAY and the Naples Daily News that showed eight women died after procedures at a plastic surgery business owned by one doctor.

In April, a second story revealed the state tried unsuccessfully to pass legislation four times that would have cracked down on the centers, even as felony offenders opened their own facilities with no background screening by the state.

In those businesses, at least 13 women died after cosmetic surgeries and nearly a dozen others were critically injured, including two hospitalized in septic shock.

Why Courteney Cox Stopped Using Face Fillers: “I Don’t Look Like Myself”

Why Courteney Cox Stopped Using Face Fillers: “I Don’t Look Like Myself” “You have to accept getting older, and that’s something that I had a hard time doing.” But using fillers didn’t work out as well as she’d hoped. “I didn’t realize it until one day I kind of stepped back and went, ‘Oh s-. I don’t look like myself,’” she said. Cox told New Beauty back in 2017 that injectable enhancements were once a slippery slope for her. “What would end up happening is that you go to a doctor who would say, ‘You look great, but what would help is a little injection here or filler there,’” she said. “So you walk out and you don’t look so bad and you think, no one noticed-it’s good.

The majority of the patients who lost their lives were African-American or Hispanic women – ethnic groups singled out in the clinics' advertising blitzes.

Anitere Flores, a Miami senate Republican who led the drive, said it was time to close a dangerous loophole that allowed the state to regulate doctors who owned clinics, but not the private entrepreneurs who began opening facilities more than a decade ago.

“People are dying and being horribly disfigured,” she told Senate colleagues before their vote on the bill. “We are going to take a step to make sure this doesn't happen to anyone else."

The House finalized the legislation on Wednesday, passing it unanimously. It now heads to Gov. Ron DeSantis for his signature.

The new legislation, which takes effect in January, will give the state the power to suspend a clinic's operations or even revoke its registration if the state finds the facility poses an imminent threat to the public.

Privacy curtains could be reservoir of deadly bacteria: Study

Privacy curtains could be reservoir of deadly bacteria: Study Hard-to-clean privacy curtains in hospitals and nursing homes worldwide may be contaminated with deadly drug-resistant bugs, according to findings to be presented Saturday at an infectious diseases conference. More than a fifth of 1,500 samples taken from six post-acute care nursing facilities in the United States were laced with one or more dangerous bacteria, including the hospital bug MRSA, researchers found. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

Each clinic owner must appoint a doctor as the key person in charge to ensure a facility is safe for patients – a role now filled by anyone in charge of the center. If a surgery office is shut down, the state can ban the owner and the doctors from working in another center for five years.

The reforms represent the first successful effort to regulate surgery centers since the late 1990s, when plastic surgery was still a cottage industry in Florida dominated by traditional clinics and board-certified practitioners.

Shelia Powell, 35, a Mississippi mother of twin daughters whose lung was punctured during her tummy tuck surgery last year said the measures could save lives.

"Lots of people came there and died there," Powell said. "It was like they could do whatever they wanted to do and there were no consequences."

This Plastic Surgery Procedure That Promises to Give You Six-Pack Abs Is Ridiculous

This Plastic Surgery Procedure That Promises to Give You Six-Pack Abs Is Ridiculous "Abdominal etching" involves suctioning fat from specific parts of the abdomen, but nobody gets to look like Channing Tatum without major effort. 

For patients who are injured, the new regulations require all clinics to carry at least $250,000 in malpractice coverage.

Video: Friends, relatives left with tragedy after plastic surgeries lead to death (USA Today)

Up until now, patients had to fend for themselves, at times losing their jobs and getting buried in medical debts, said Andres Beregovich, an Orlando lawyer who has investigated the clinics on behalf of patients.

"How is that fair?" he asked.

Beregovich said his main concern with the new legislation is whether the state will require the clinics to show health authorities proof of that coverage.

Patient advocates applauded the reforms but were harshly critical of the loss of one protection during negotiations over the bill: a requirement to screen owners for criminal records.

The background checks were pulled off the table after the Agency for Healthcare Administration raised concerns about the costs, including the possibility of having to pay for seven new staff positions, records show.

Former Sen. Eleanor Sobel, who tried unsuccessfully three times to get legislation passed, said removing the requirement was "crazy," citing USA TODAY's story exposing the state for allowing four people with felony convictions to open businesses where patients died.

Tess Holliday Wants You to Know That Getting Plastic Surgery *Can* Be Body Positive

Tess Holliday Wants You to Know That Getting Plastic Surgery *Can* Be Body Positive She posted a pic with a plastic surgeon after getting "a little non-surgical refresh."

Dave Aronberg, Palm Beach County's state attorney, questioned whether the state really would have needed to hire seven new people.

"It just seems like an inflated number," he said. "The fact that [the background checks] are not being done because they are too expensive is not a legitimate reason to jeopardize public health."

Flores acknowledged she and other supporters of the bill had to strike some compromises. But she said the core of the plan remains, giving the state "the tools" to shut down problem centers.

Currently, only seven other states and the District of Columbia have laws that permit health departments to crack down on cosmetic surgery facilities with sanctions including suspensions and fines, according to the Policy Surveillance Program at Temple University.

Flores said among the things that has most disturbed her was that, even after highly publicized death cases, clinic owners remained open by simply removing a troubled doctor and replacing them with another dangerous surgeon.

The "most frustrating is that in these cases where someone dies in a clinic the place will simply shut down for 24 hours and open up the next day," said Flores. "Not a big deal, not a problem."

Many doctors working in the clinics were not adequately trained in plastic surgery or had been previously disciplined by medical boards for charges including unethical conduct and malpractice in death cases, USA TODAY found.

During an impassioned speech last week to the Senate, Flores reminded her colleagues that the women traveling to Miami for their surgeries were not only from Florida.

“This is not a Miami problem. It’s not a South Florida problem. It’s a national problem,” she said. “There was a young woman from West Virginia. Her name was Heather Meadows. Twenty-nine years old. Left behind two children. And her kids are never going to see her again because, quite frankly, we dropped the ball.”

Since filing her bill in February, Flores said she has been contacted by parents who lost their adult children and doctors who treated patients who suffered injuries in the cosmetic clinics.

“If there is a silver lining in there, it is that your family member’s…death was not in vain,” she said. “It was because of that tragedy, today we’re going to take a step to make sure that doesn’t have to happen to anybody else.”

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Florida lawmakers OK sweeping reforms to crack down on deadly cosmetic surgery facilities

The Dominican Republic has a history of 'plastic surgery tourism' that has led to hospitalizations and deaths.
Earlier this month, a New York man and an Alabama teacher died in instances related to undergoing plastic surgery in the DR.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!