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Health & FitHow Power-Lifting HelpsThis Amputee Veteran Battle Depression

22:45  13 may  2019
22:45  13 may  2019 Source:   menshealth.com

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KC Mitchell, an amputee veteran powerlifter , shares how strength training helped him conquer depression . We may earn a commission through links on our site. How Power - Lifting Helps This Amputee In 2017, Mitchell became the first amputee to compete in a full powerlifting competition

KC Mitchell, an amputee veteran powerlifter , shares how strength training helped him conquer depression .

How Power-Lifting HelpsThis Amputee Veteran Battle Depression© Emiliano Granaldo How Power-Lifting Helps Battle Depression

This is one in a series of 12 stories that explores the role of strength in modern life.

KC Mitchell hit rock bottom at the Happiest Place on Earth. Disney-land, 2013: The now-34-year-old Army veteran and amputee-IED, Kandahar province, Afghanistan-had planned three days with his wife and daughter in the park. But his pain was inescapable. Day one went like this: stand in line, feel that raging pain, get anxious, sit and sulk, eat more Oxy, repeat.

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Symptoms include depression , self-destructive behavior, irritability and addiction. However, this percentage does not apply to amputees , of whom 66 percent have symptoms of the condition. In 2017, Mitchell was the first amputee to participate in a full powerlifting competition.

© EMILIANO GRANADO How Power - Lifting Helps Battle Depression “I paid for the trip up front,” he says. “And I kicked Disneyland’s a*s for three days In 2017, Mitchell became the first amputee to compete in a full powerlifting competition; he squatted 435, benched 424, and deadlifted 600 pounds.

Which wasn’t surprising. Mitchell had spent the past year in a hole. He would mostly play video games alone at home while eating Doritos and OxyContin with a Rolling Rock back, a habit that rendered him a sorrowful, unable, addicted mess.

So they cut the trip short, the visit that was meant to celebrate his daughter’s second birthday. “And it just upset me so bad,” says Mitchell. “I wasn’t living up to the person and dad that I wanted to be.”

A quarter of Iraq- and Afghanistan--war veterans return stateside with post--traumatic stress disorder, the symptoms of which include depression, self--destructive behavior, irritability, and addiction. That percentage, however, doesn’t apply to amputees, 66 per-cent of whom show symptoms of the condition.

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“Disneyland was my reckoning,” says Mitchell. “I remember getting back to the house and flushing every single narcotic. I just accepted that I’m always going to be in pain, and that was that.” Three days of crawl-out-of-your-skin withdrawal followed, after which Mitchell used that magical momentum from newfound sobriety to carry himself into a gym.

“I was insecure. I wore sweatpants to cover my leg,” he says. But he began showing up every day, eventually making friends whom he told to “make sure I’m coming here.” Within several months, he was walking stronger. “I didn’t have that little hitch in my step, and I was just feeling better,” he says. With his daughter’s third birthday looming, it was time to face that mouse again.

How Power-Lifting HelpsThis Amputee Veteran Battle Depression© EMILIANO GRANADO How Power-Lifting Helps Battle Depression “I paid for the trip up front,” he says. “And I kicked Disneyland’s a*s for three days straight.” Iron and the act of moving it pulled Mitchell out of holes both physical and mental, strengthening his outlook and wounded body. Science backs his experience: New research suggests that strength training is one of the best ways to treat depression.

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How Power - Lifting HelpsThis Amputee Veteran Battle Depression . Veterans Advantage works hard to secure exclusive savings and benefits that help military and veteran families save money online and in stores without showing sensitive documents.

In a sport dominated by able-bodied competitors, St. Johns' Bobby Body, an amputee , has won national and world championships in power lifting . 'I wasn’t going to allow it to defeat me,' says disabled veteran setting new powerlifting records. In a sport dominated by able-bodied competitors

In 2015, he caught wind of competitive powerlifting, a sport in which you bench, squat, and deadlift as much weight as possible. The idea of a one-legged dude doing heavy, lower-body compound lifts yielded bewildered looks, but Mitchell didn’t care. He went to that gym every day.

Squatting was the hardest. “It was something that had been so easy to do,” says Mitchell. Squatting big numbers requires “spreading the floor,” pushing laterally with your feet and bending at the ankle as you lower the weight, which is not easy to do with a prosthesis. It took him a year to be able to use regulation form, where your hips drop below your knees.

In 2017, Mitchell became the first amputee to compete in a full powerlifting competition; he squatted 435, benched 424, and deadlifted 600 pounds.

“I’m doing things I never thought I’d be capable of doing when I first got blown up,” he says. His journey has him rethinking the PTSD label. “I’ve been through some sh*t. But I hate the label PTSD, because it makes me sound like I have an incurable virus. I call it post-traumatic self-growth instead.”

Read More

Amputee can feel objects again with prosthetic arm inspired by Luke Skywalker.
About 17 years ago, Keven Walgamott lost his left hand and part of his forearm in an electrical accident. Now, Walgamott can use his thoughts to tell the fingers of his bionic hand to pick up eggs and grapes. The prosthetic arm he tested also allowed Walgamott to feel the objects he grasped. © Dan Hixson/University of Utah College of Engineering University of Utah biomedical engineering doctoral student Jacob George, left, and associate professor Gregory Clark, helped develop the technology that enables the wearer of the LUKE Arm to sense touch.

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