Health & Fit: How Drinking Alcohol And Smoking Can Increase Osteoporosis Risk - PressFrom - US
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Health & FitHow Drinking Alcohol And Smoking Can Increase Osteoporosis Risk

16:00  16 may  2019
16:00  16 may  2019 Source:   medicaldaily.com

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Osteoporosis is usually an age-related disease that makes our bones brittle, but new research suggests that drinking and smoking can greatly increase Interestingly, new research has shown that smoking and drinking alcohol can also increase the risk of developing the bone disease

Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by low bone mass, increased bone fragility, and susceptibility Other risk factors for osteoporosis . People who drink alcohol are 75 percent more likely to smoke than are nondrinkers, and As is the case for other lifestyle factors that affect osteoporosis risk , little research has addressed how alcohol might interact with other aspects

How Drinking Alcohol And Smoking Can Increase Osteoporosis Risk © andresr/Getty Images Drinking alcohol can cause a lot of problems down the line. Of course, there’s no denying the pleasurable effects of alcohol, which only increase the more you drink it. Unfortunately, every part of your body is affected negatively by too much drinking, especially the brain and liver. On the other hand, there’s smoking, which is linked to many diseases and conditions, particularly lung cancer that is known to affect mortality rate.

There’s no question that excessively doing the two has some life-threatening consequences. Interestingly, new research has shown that smoking and drinking alcohol can also increase the risk of developing the bone disease early, even more so when done together. Researchers were able to find a cell mechanism that can help explain why these two would lead to the bone condition.

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Osteoporosis . Stopping Smoking , Alcohol Abuse. Smoking in any amounts has a detrimental effect on bone density. Alcohol intake of greater than 3 ounces per day (or about 2-3 typical drinks ) has been shown Smoking impacts a person at risk for developing osteoporosis in several ways14.

Mitochondria, the tiny enclosures that produce energy in cells, send out a signal that triggers this process when under stress.

The cell mechanism in question is found in the mitochondria, which is known for being the cell’s powerhouse. To be more specific, the mitochondria that get affected are the ones in macrophages, which are immune cells that helps fight cell waste and foreign objects by absorbing them.

According to the research, certain lifestyle factors like the couple mentioned above triggers the mitochondria of macrophages, causing them to be under stress and triggering a process that would essentially turn the cells itself into osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are a type of cells known to gradually dissolve bones. This mechanism is the one that triggers the start of .

“We show in this paper that when mitochondrial function is affected, it not only affects energy production but also triggers a type of stress signaling that induces the overproduction of osteoclasts,” Narayan G. Avadhani, senior study author and a professor of biochemistry at Penn’s School of Veterinary Medicine, said. Avadhani and the team’s findings were published in the FASEB Journal.

Over time, age is usually the culprit behind . That’s because the more we age, the more imbalance there is between bone generation and bone absorption, causing our bones to become brittle and more porous.

However, the research suggests that the disease can develop early due to certain lifestyle factors, like smoking and drinking alcohol, that cause changes in macrophages. At the moment, the researchers are trying to find out whether reversing this can help decrease the risk.

Men Are At a Greater Risk for Osteoporosis—Here’s How to Prevent It.
Research reveals that one in five men over the age of 50 will suffer a fracture due to this bone-deteriorating condition. In fact, men are 27 percent more likely to break a bone because of osteoporosis than they are to get prostate cancer. And according to the report, men are twice as likely as women to die following one of these fractures. The problem is largely preventable. Take specific steps in your 20s, 30s, and 40s to preserve the bone mass you have, and your skeleton should be in much better shape once you reach retirement age.

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