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Health & FitDairy Queen's Soft Serve Isn't Technically Ice Cream

18:18  18 june  2019
18:18  18 june  2019 Source:   eatthis.com

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" Technically , our soft - serve does not qualify to be called ice cream ," the Dairy Queen site fesses up. The company also explains that its famous soft - serve once fell into the FDA' s category of " ice milk." But the FDA scrapped that category of products to allow companies to market their frozen dairy

It's called soft - serve for a reason, and the company has stated before that the frozen delight served in its thousands of locations doesn' t exactly qualify as ice cream . Want to know what makes Dairy Queen ' s soft - serve taste so delicious? That's too bad, because it's made with a secret formula that

Dairy Queen's Soft Serve Isn't Technically Ice Cream © Provided by Eat This, Not That! Scan the menu at your local Dairy Queen, and you’ll spot blizzards, cones, parfaits, banana splits, shakes, and malts. But noticeably absent from the menu? Ice cream!

File this in the “weird, but true” category: Dairy Queen’s frozen treats aren’t actually ice cream. The reason comes down to some good ole’ technicalities from the Food and Drug Administration. While fancier ice cream companies are ramping up the milkfat content in their products, Dairy Queen is sticking with its original recipe. As it turns out, the fast food chain doesn’t use enough milkfat for its Blizzards, ice cream cones, and other treats to meet the FDA’s official ice cream qualifications. Once you learn more about Dairy Queen’s soft serve, don’t miss the Best Ice Cream Shop in Every State, too!

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Our original world-famous soft serve cone, truly a classic! Vanilla Cone - Kids' INGREDIENTS: Artificially Flavored Vanilla Reduced Fat Ice Cream : Milkfat And Nonfat Milk, Sugar, Corn Syrup, Whey, Mono And Diglycerides, Artificial Flavor, Guar Gum, Polysorbate 80, Carrageenan, Vitamin A

Check DQ ' s entire ice cream cake menu that is perfect for any occasion whether it is a treatzza pizza, torte, or a good ole' fashion cake. Order one today!

Why isn’t Dairy Queen soft serve ice cream?

To earn an “ice cream” categorization, a product must have a minimum milkfat (or butterfat, as DQ calls it) content of 10%. DQ’s soft serve, meanwhile, has just five percent milkfat.

“Technically, our soft serve does not qualify to be called ice cream,” the Dairy Queen site fesses up. The company also explains that its famous soft serve once fell into the FDA’s category of “ice milk.” But the FDA scrapped that category of product to allow companies to market their frozen dairy products with lower milkfat content using terms like “low-fat” and “reduced fat.”

Dairy Queen’s soft serve does fit into the FDA’s “reduced-fat” category, and its shake mix would count as “low-fat,” the company website explains, but the company has never marked it that way.

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The Blizzard is Dairy Queen ' s best-selling frozen treat, despite technically not being ice cream . 07.09.2020 · This recipe lets you recreate Dairy Queen ’ s famous soft ice cream with just a few ingredients. Although, you will need the special help of a soft serve ice cream maker to make this

There' s really only one place where adding chocolate soft serve ice cream to a fast food menu would warrant a review, and we managed to find it. Dairy Queen

Does that mean DQ treats are healthy?

Nope! Even though they have a lower butterfat content, that doesn’t mean Dairy Queen products are fat-free or sugar-free. Dairy Queen doesn’t currently have any sugar-free or fat-free options on its menu, although there are a few no-sugar-added options. Here’s a look at the nutrition information for a small Oreo Cookie Blizzard Treat.

Dairy Queen's Soft Serve Isn't Technically Ice Cream © Courtesy of Dairy Queen dairy queen oreo blizzard in blue cup with plastic red spoon
610 calories, 22 g fat (11 g saturated fat), 390 mg sodium, 91 g carbs (1g fiber, 67 g sugar), 12 g protein

Has the DQ recipe changed over time?

While the FDA definitions have changed, the Dairy Queen products have remained the same, and that’s something that Dairy Queen is proud of, too.

John Fremont McCullough developed the soft serve formula that’s used in Dairy Queen desserts before the first DQ ever opened. (The original location was in Joliet, Illinois, and it opened in 1940.) Decades later, the same recipe for soft serve is still going strong, even if it’s not officially an ice cream recipe.

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Soft serve , also known as soft ice , is a frozen dairy dessert, similar to ice cream but softer and less dense as a result of air being introduced during freezing. Soft serve has been sold commercially since the late 1930 s in the US.

The World Famous DQ Soft Serve Ice Cream . Creamy and smooth, there is nothing as deliciously perfect as DQ Soft Serve . Enjoy it in a Blizzard, Peanut Buster

Are there any other fun facts about Dairy Queen?

You may have heard that if a DQ employee doesn’t serve your blizzard treat upside down, then it’s free. Fact or fiction?

Well, it depends. It’s up to the independent franchise owner at each restaurant to decide whether the blizzards will be served upside down. And it’s the franchisee’s decision if they want to participate in the promotion if their employees forget to do the customary inverted serve. And, hey, could “ice cream” perform that party trick?

Dairy Queen’s soft serve doesn’t meet the FDA qualifications to be ice cream. But that doesn’t mean it has any less of a place in fans’ hearts. Even with the lower milkfat content, blizzards are still creamy, and they come in so many fun flavors—what’s not to love? Plus, check out the surprising things you didn’t know About Dairy Queen.

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Dairy Queen's Soft Serve Isn't Technically Ice Cream
Dairy Queen's Soft Serve Isn't Technically Ice Cream
Dairy Queen's Soft Serve Isn't Technically Ice Cream
Dairy Queen's Soft Serve Isn't Technically Ice Cream
Dairy Queen's Soft Serve Isn't Technically Ice Cream
Dairy Queen's Soft Serve Isn't Technically Ice Cream
Dairy Queen's Soft Serve Isn't Technically Ice Cream
Dairy Queen's Soft Serve Isn't Technically Ice Cream
Dairy Queen's Soft Serve Isn't Technically Ice Cream
Dairy Queen's Soft Serve Isn't Technically Ice Cream
Dairy Queen's Soft Serve Isn't Technically Ice Cream
Dairy Queen's Soft Serve Isn't Technically Ice Cream
Dairy Queen's Soft Serve Isn't Technically Ice Cream
Dairy Queen's Soft Serve Isn't Technically Ice Cream
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